Culver City, California

Culver City is a city in Los Angeles County, California. The city was named after its founder, Harry Culver.[9] As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 38,883. It is mostly surrounded by the city of Los Angeles, but also shares a border with unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County. Over the years, it has annexed more than 40 pieces of adjoining land and now comprises about five square miles.

Since the 1920s, Culver City has been a center for motion picture and later television production, best known as the home of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios. From 1932 to 1986, it was the headquarters for the Hughes Aircraft Company. National Public Radio West and Sony Pictures Entertainment have headquarters in the city. The NFL Network studio is also based in Culver City.

Culver City, California
Culver City sign at sunset in October 2010
Culver City sign at sunset in October 2010
Flag of Culver City, California
Flag
Official seal of Culver City, California
Seal
Motto(s): 
"The Heart of Screenland"
Location within Los Angeles County
Location within Los Angeles County
Culver City is located in the Los Angeles metropolitan area
Culver City
Culver City
Location within the Los Angeles metropolitan area
Culver City is located in California
Culver City
Culver City
Location within California
Culver City is located in the United States
Culver City
Culver City
Location within the United States
Coordinates: 34°0′28″N 118°24′3″W / 34.00778°N 118.40083°WCoordinates: 34°0′28″N 118°24′3″W / 34.00778°N 118.40083°W
CountryUnited States
StateCalifornia
CountyLos Angeles
IncorporatedSeptember 20, 1917[1]
Named forHarry Culver
Government
 • TypeCouncil-manager
 • MayorThomas Aujero Small
 • Vice mayorMeghan Sahli-Wells
 • City councilGöran Eriksson
Alex Fisch
Daniel Lee
 • City ManagerJohn M. Nachbar[2]
Area
 • Total5.14 sq mi (13.31 km2)
 • Land5.11 sq mi (13.24 km2)
 • Water0.03 sq mi (0.07 km2)  0.54%
Elevation95 ft (29 m)
Population
 • Total38,883
 • Estimate 
(2016)[6]
39,364
 • Density7,701.82/sq mi (2,973.78/km2)
Time zoneUTC−8 (Pacific Time Zone)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−7 (PDT)
ZIP codes
90230–90233,90066[7]
Area codes310/424[8]
FIPS code06-17568
GNIS feature IDs1652695, 2410276
Websitewww.culvercity.org

History

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920503
19305,6691,027.0%
19408,97658.3%
195019,720119.7%
196032,16363.1%
197034,4517.1%
198038,13910.7%
199038,7931.7%
200038,8160.1%
201038,8830.2%
Est. 201639,364[6]1.2%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]

Early history

Archaeological evidence suggests a human presence in the area of present-day Culver City since at least 8,000 BC.[11] The region was the homeland of the Tongva-Gabrieliño Native Americans.[12][13][14]

The city was founded primarily on the lands of the former Rancho La Ballona, Rancho Rincon de los Bueyes, and Rancho La Cienega o Paso de la Tijera.[12]

Camp Latham

In 1861, during the American Civil War, Camp Latham was established by the 1st California Infantry under Col. James H. Carleton and the 1st California Cavalry under Lt. Col. Benjamin F. Davis. Named for California Senator Milton S. Latham, the camp was the first staging area for the training of Union troops and their operations in Southern California. It was located on land of the Rancho La Ballona, on the South side of Ballona Creek, near what is now the intersection of Jefferson and Overland Boulevards.[15][16][17] The post was later moved to Camp Drum, which became the Drum Barracks.[18]

Culver City

Harry Culver first attempted to establish Culver City in 1913; the city was incorporated on September 20, 1917. (His first ads read "All roads lead to Culver City", indicating a main transportation route via the city.[12]) The city was one of many all-white planned communities started in the Los Angeles area around this time.[19]

The first film studio in Culver City was built by Thomas Ince in 1918. Silent film comedy producer Hal Roach built his studios there in 1919, and Metro Goldwyn Mayer (MGM) in the '20s. During Prohibition, speakeasies and nightclubs such as the Cotton Club lined Washington Boulevard.

Culver Center, one of Southern California's first shopping malls, was completed in 1950[20] on Venice Boulevard near the Overland Avenue intersection. Many other retail stores, including a Rite Aid and several banks and restaurants, have occupied the center since then.[21]

CulverCity-1913
The site of Culver City, 1913

Hughes Aircraft Company

Hughes Aircraft opened its Culver City plant in July 1941. There the company built the H-4 Hercules transport (commonly called the "Spruce Goose"). Hughes was also an active subcontractor in World War II. It developed and patented a flexible feed chute for faster loading of machine guns on B-17 bombers, and manufactured electric booster drives for machine guns. Hughes produced more ammunition belts than any other American manufacturer, and built 5,576 wings and 6,370 rear fuselage sections for Vultee BT-13 trainers.[22][23]

Hughes grew after the war, and in 1953 Howard Hughes donated all his stock in the company to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. After he died in 1976, the institute sold the company, which made it the second-best-endowed medical research foundation in the world.[24]

The studios (1960s and 1970s)

The Hal Roach Studios were demolished in 1963. In the late 1960s, much of the MGM backlot acreage (lot 3 and other property on Jefferson Boulevard), and the nearby 28.5-acre (11.5 ha) of the RKO Forty Acres, once owned by RKO Pictures and later Desilu Productions, were sold by their owners. In 1976 the sets were razed to make way for redevelopment. Today the RKO site is the southern expansion of the Hayden Industrial Tract, while the MGM property has been converted to a subdivision and a shopping center known as Raintree Plaza.

Rebirth of downtown (1990s and 2000s)

In the 1990s, Culver City launched a successful revitalization program in which it renovated its downtown as well as several shopping centers in the Sepulveda Boulevard corridor near Westfield Culver City. Around the same time, Sony's motion picture subsidiary, Columbia Pictures, moved into the old MGM lot.

The influx of many art galleries and restaurants to the eastern part of the city, formally designated the Culver City Art District,[25] prompted The New York Times in 2007 to praise the new art scene and call Culver City a "nascent Chelsea."[26]

In 2012 Roger Vincent of the Los Angeles Times said that, according to local observers, the city's "reputation as a pedestrian-friendly destination with upscale restaurants, gastropubs and a thriving art scene is less than a decade old."[27]

Movie and television production

Hundreds of movies have been produced on the lots of Culver City's studios: Sony Pictures Studios (originally MGM Studios), Culver Studios, and the former Hal Roach Studios. These include The Wizard of Oz, The Thin Man, Gone with the Wind, Rebecca, the Tarzan series, and the original King Kong. More recent films made in Culver City include Grease, Raging Bull, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, City Slickers, Air Force One, Wag the Dog and Contact. Television series made on Culver City sets have included Las Vegas, Gunsmoke, Cougar Town, Mad About You, Lassie, Hogan's Heroes, Batman, The Green Hornet, Arrested Development, The Andy Griffith Show, Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C., Jeopardy!, The Nanny, Hell's Kitchen, MasterChef, the syndicated version of Wheel of Fortune and Tosh. O. The television series The Green Hornet featured Bruce Lee as Kato; he resided in Culver City during its production.

John Travolta's "Stranded at the Drive-In" sequence in Grease was filmed at the Studio Drive-In on the corner of Jefferson and Sepulveda. It served as a set for many other films, including Pee-wee's Big Adventure. The theatre was closed in 1993 and demolished in 1998; it is now a housing subdivision featuring large homes on small lots, as well as the Kayne-ERAS center, a school and community center for the disabled and mentally challenged.

Culver City's streets have been featured in many films and television series. Since much of the architecture has not changed in decades, particularly in residential areas, the nostalgic sitcom The Wonder Years set many of its outdoor scenes in Culver City. The 1970s–80s series CHiPs also featured many chase scenes through the streets. The Nicolas Cage film Matchstick Men included scenes made at Veterans Memorial Park, which was also featured in the opening scenes of the sitcom The Hogan Family.

The Aviator, a film about Howard Hughes, featured several mentions of Culver City in connection with Hughes. Scenes from Bewitched (2005) with Nicole Kidman and Will Ferrell were also filmed in the Culver City streets. The film Fun with Dick and Jane (2005) starring Jim Carrey was filmed there. The closing aerial sequence of Get Shorty (1995) starring John Travolta and Danny DeVito is also filmed in Culver City, at Sony Pictures Studios. Additionally, scenes of Superbad (2007) starring Jonah Hill and Michael Cera were filmed in areas surrounding Culver City High School.

In 2010, the films Killers and Dinner for Schmucks were filmed in Culver City. In 2011, Lincoln Lawyer, Moneyball, Horrible Bosses and Jack and Jill were released, all of which were filmed in Culver City. Think Like a Man and The Campaign were filmed in Culver City and released in 2012.

Transportation

Culver CityBus Rapid and Local Buses
Culver CityBus: Rapid and Local Buses

The Culver City station of the Los Angeles Metro Expo Line sits at the Culver Junction near Venice and Robertson Boulevards in Culver City. The Expo Line provides a light rail connection from Culver City to Downtown Los Angeles in the east and Downtown Santa Monica in the west, mostly following the right-of-way that the Pacific Electric Santa Monica Air Line used, also known as the Exposition Blvd line by PE. Culver City Station was the western terminus of the Expo Line from its opening on June 20, 2012, to the opening of Expo Line phase two on May 20, 2016.[28]

Culver City Bus operates bus service within Culver City.[29]

The city is served by the Los Angeles International Airport, about 7 miles (11 km) south of the city.

Points of interest

Helmsbakery12
Historic Helms Bakery on Washington Blvd.

Businesses

Education and research

Local landmarks

Museums and the arts

Actors' Gang at Ivy Substation in Media Park, Culver City, California
Actors' Gang at Ivy Substation in Media Park, Culver City, California
  • The Actors' Gang[34] at the Ivy Substation (within the Palms district, city of Los Angeles, but on long-term lease to Culver City)
  • Kirk Douglas Theatre,[35] featuring the Center Theater Group
  • Mayme A. Clayton Library & Museum:[36] the largest and most academically substantial independently held collection of objects, documents and memorabilia on African-American history and culture.
  • The Wende Museum[37] possesses a collection of Soviet and East German visual art and everyday artifacts to promote an understanding of Soviet art, history and culture between 1945 and 1991 and draw comparisons to contemporary events and issues.

Recreation

Parks

Culvercity-veteransmemorialbuilding-tower-park
Veterans Memorial Building at Veteran's Park
  • Baldwin Hills Scenic Overlook
  • Blair Hills Park
  • Blanco Park
  • Carlson Park
  • Coombs Park
  • Culver City Park
    • The Boneyard (Dog Park)
    • Culver City Skate Park
  • Culver West Alexander Park
  • El Marino Park
  • Fox Hills Park
  • Lindberg Park
  • Syd Kronenthal Park
  • Tellefson Park
  • Veterans Park

Library

The County of Los Angeles Public Library operates the Julian Dixon Culver City Branch on Overland Ave.

Neighborhoods

ElMarinoPark
El Marino Park

Neighborhoods[38]

Economy

Corporations with headquarters in Culver City include Beats Audio, National Public Radio West, the NFL Network, NantHealth, and Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Largest employers

Kirk Douglas Theater
Culver City's Kirk Douglas Theater at night

According to the City's 2015-16 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[39] the top employers in the city are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 Sony Pictures Entertainment 3,400
2 Southern California Hospital at Culver City formerly Brotman Medical Center 1,167
3 City of Culver City 871
4 Culver City Unified School District 760
5 Goldrich & Kest Industries, LLC 717
6 Symantec 700
7 West Los Angeles College 600
8 Target 575
9 NFL Media 525
10 Apple, Inc. 460

Geography

The city is surrounded by the Los Angeles neighborhoods of Mar Vista and Palms to the north; Westchester to the south; Mid-City, West Adams, and Baldwin Hills to the east; the Ladera Heights unincorporated area to the southeast; and the L.A. neighborhoods of Venice and Playa Vista to the west, along with the unincorporated area of Marina Del Rey.

The two primary ZIP codes for Culver City are 90230 and 90232. Because ZIP codes do not necessarily follow city boundaries, a portion of Culver City is in the 90066 ZIP code, which also serves some of the Mar Vista neighborhood of the city of Los Angeles.

Culver City's major geographic feature is Ballona Creek, which runs northeast to southwest through most of the city before it drains into Santa Monica Bay in Marina Del Rey.

Culver City is served by the San Diego, Santa Monica, and Marina freeways.

Culver City is at 34°0′28″N 118°24′3″W / 34.00778°N 118.40083°W (34.007761, -118.400905).[40] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.1 square miles (13.2 km2), over 99% of which is land.

Culver City has a Mediterranean climate, typical of coastal California.

Climate

Climate data for Culver City, California
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 67.3
(19.6)
68.6
(20.3)
69.3
(20.7)
72.6
(22.6)
73.5
(23.1)
77.1
(25.1)
80.0
(26.7)
81.1
(27.3)
80.2
(26.8)
77.0
(25.0)
71.6
(22.0)
67.7
(19.8)
73.8
(23.2)
Average low °F (°C) 46.1
(7.8)
47.2
(8.4)
49.1
(9.5)
52.0
(11.1)
55.7
(13.2)
58.8
(14.9)
61.5
(16.4)
62.2
(16.8)
61.3
(16.3)
57.2
(14.0)
50.8
(10.4)
46.3
(7.9)
54.0
(12.2)
Average rainfall inches (mm) 3.19
(81)
3.25
(83)
2.66
(68)
0.58
(15)
0.26
(6.6)
0.04
(1.0)
0.02
(0.51)
0.07
(1.8)
0.08
(2.0)
0.33
(8.4)
0.94
(24)
1.90
(48)
13.32
(338)
Average rainy days (≥ 0.01 inch) 5.7 5.3 5.8 1.7 0.7 0.2 0.3 0.2 0.6 1.1 1.9 4.0 27.5
Source: NOAA[41]

Education

Primary and secondary schools

Culver City has its own school district, Culver City Unified School District. It has five elementary schools, a middle school, two high schools (regular and continuation), a Community Day School, an Office of Child Development, and an Adult School. There are three elementary schools that are part of the Los Angeles Unified School District. In addition, there is an Independent Study program where students of elementary, middle school, or high school age can make a weekly appointment to drop off and pick up homework, which is to be completed throughout the week.

STAR Prep Academy, a private middle and high school, was established in 2004 and shares its campus with the STAR ECO Station, an exotic wildlife rescue center. It is one of the few schools in the United States where students can work with exotic and endangered animals daily as part of their curriculum.[42]

The Willows Community School is a private primary, elementary and middle school, grades DK through 8, established in 1994 on Higuera Street.

Turning Point School is an independent primary, elementary and middle school, serving students from 2 years 9 months through grade 8, on National Blvd.

Kayne Eras Center is on Machado Road. In July 2008, the Kayne Eras Center merged with the Exceptional Children's Foundation, creating the only agency in Southern California that provides a continuum of services to individuals with disabilities from birth through adulthood..

Wildwood School is a private primary, elementary, middle and high school, grades K through 12, established in 1971 on McManus Avenue.

Echo Horizon School is a private primary, elementary, and middle school, grades Pre-K through 6, established in 1985 on McManus Avenue.

Culver City High School's Academy of Visual and Performing Arts (AVPA) is a "specialized secondary program" created in 1996 through a grant from the state of California with major support from Sony Pictures Entertainment. The program offers classes in departments of Music, Theatre, Visual Art, Film, and Dance that occur after the regular school day at Culver City HS has ended.

Colleges and universities

West Los Angeles College, in an unincorporated section of Los Angeles County adjacent to Culver City,[43] is part of the Los Angeles Community College District. Antioch University Los Angeles is on Corporate Point, off Slauson Avenue.

Other

The Los Angeles County Probation Department's Training Academy is on the campus of West L.A. College.

Culver City has the Los Angeles area campus of the Gemological Institute of America as well as the Academy of Beauty and the Biofeedback Institute of Los Angeles.

Demographics

2010

The 2010 United States Census[44] reported that Culver City had a population of 38,883. The population density was 7,566.0 people per square mile (2,921.2/km2). The racial makeup of Culver City was 23,450 (60.3%) White (48.0% Non-Hispanic White),[45] 3,694 (9.5%) African American, 191 (0.5%) Native American, 5,742 (14.8%) Asian, 81 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 3,364 (8.7%) from other races, and 2,361 (6.1%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9,025 persons (23.2%).

The Census reported that 38,572 people (99.2% of the population) lived in households, 84 (0.2%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 227 (0.6%) were institutionalized.

There were 16,779 households, out of which 4,499 (26.8%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 6,826 (40.7%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 1,882 (11.2%) had a female householder with no husband present, 636 (3.8%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 922 (5.5%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 157 (0.9%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 5,649 households (33.7%) were made up of individuals and 1,956 (11.7%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30. There were 9,344 families (55.7% of all households); the average family size was 3.01.

The population was spread out with 7,312 people (18.8%) under the age of 18, 2,711 people (7.0%) aged 18 to 24, 12,098 people (31.1%) aged 25 to 44, 10,956 people (28.2%) aged 45 to 64, and 5,806 people (14.9%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.5 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.6 males.

There were 17,491 housing units at an average density of 3,403.5 per square mile (1,314.1/km2), of which 9,111 (54.3%) were owner-occupied, and 7,668 (45.7%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 0.7%; the rental vacancy rate was 4.1%. 21,549 people (55.4% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 17,023 people (43.8%) lived in rental housing units.

According to the 2010 United States Census, Culver City had a median household income of $77,333, with 7.1% of the population living below the federal poverty line.[45]

2000

As of the census[46] of 2000, there were 38,816 people, 16,611 households, and 9,518 families residing in the city. The population density was 7,589.8 inhabitants per square mile (2,932.9/km2). There were 17,130 housing units at an average density of 1,294.3/km2 (3,349.5/mi2). The racial makeup of the city was 59.24% White, 11.96% Black or African American, 0.71% Native American, 12.02% Asian, 0.21% Pacific Islander, 10.16% from other races, and 5.69% from two or more races. 23.70% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 16,611 households out of which 26.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.8% were married couples living together, 12.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 42.7% were non-families. 34.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.31 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the city, the population was spread out with 20.9% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 33.3% from 25 to 44, 25.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 87.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $51,792, and the median income for a family was $61,451, these figures had risen to $65,525 and $82,582 as of a 2007 estimate.[47] Males had a median income of $46,683 versus $41,478 for females. The per capita income for the city was $29,025. About 5.5% of families and 8.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.1% of those under age 18 and 5.1% of those age 65 or over.

Government

In Los Angeles County, Culver City is in the 2nd Supervisorial District, represented by Mark Ridley-Thomas.

In the California State Legislature, Culver City is in the 30th Senate District, represented by Democrat Holly Mitchell, and in the 54th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Sydney Kamlager.[48]

In the United States House of Representatives, Culver City is in California's 37th congressional district, represented by Democrat Karen Bass.[49]

Public services

The Los Angeles County Department of Health Services SPA 5 West Area Health Office serves Culver City.[50] The department operates the Simms/Mann Health and Wellness Center in Santa Monica, serving Culver City.[51]

The United States Postal Service operates the Culver City Post Office at 11111 Jefferson Boulevard and the Gateway Post Office at 9942 Culver Boulevard.[52][53]

Culver City is served by its own police force, the Culver City Police Department, at 4040 Duquesne Avenue.[54]

Culver City's fire department (ISO class 1), the Culver City Fire Department, has its headquarters at 9600 Culver Boulevard.[55]

Culver CityBus was founded in 4 March 1928, making it the second oldest municipal bus line in California[56] and the oldest public transit bus system still operating in Los Angeles County.[57] Big Blue Bus was founded on 14 April 1928.[57][58]

Sister cities

Culver City has five sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International:

Notable people

See also

References

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  2. ^ "Government, City Manager". Culver City. Retrieved January 4, 2015.
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  28. ^ Lelyveld, Nita; Nelson, Laura. "Trains are packed as Metro's Expo Line extension to Santa Monica opens". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 22 May 2016.
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  32. ^ NPR always seems to be reporting from a town called Culver City. Why? by Paul Farhi for The Washington Post June 29, 2016
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  34. ^ "The Actors Gang".
  35. ^ "Kirk Douglas Theatre, Los Angeles, Center Theatre Group".
  36. ^ "The Mayme A. Clayton Library & Museum".
  37. ^ "The Wende Museum".
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  50. ^ "About Us." Los Angeles County Department of Health Services. Retrieved on March 18, 2010.
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  53. ^ "Post Office Location - GATEWAY." United States Postal Service. Retrieved on December 6, 2008.
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  56. ^ "Culver City Timeline: A Work in Progress". Culver City Historical Society.
  57. ^ a b "Public Transit Ridership, Los Angeles County, California". www.laalmanac.com.
  58. ^ "Our History - Big Blue Bus". www.bigbluebus.com.
  59. ^ "Regular Meeting of the City Council, Culver City July 24, 2017". culver-city.legistar.com. Retrieved 2017-07-24.
  60. ^ "Department of Community Justice | Multnomah County". co.multnomah.or.us. Retrieved 2014-05-03.
  61. ^ "Drew Barrymore (I)". Imdb.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  62. ^ "Seattle Seahawks - Players : Michael Bumpus". Seahawks.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  63. ^ "Gary Carter Baseball Stats". Baseball-almanac.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  64. ^ "Dee Dee Davis (II)". Imdb.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  65. ^ "Jeff Fisher Agent - Speaker Fee - Booking Contact". www.nopactalent.com.
  66. ^ ": Robert Trujillo - Musician Profile". Spirit-of-metal.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  67. ^ "Charles Herbert (I)". Imdb.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  68. ^ "Helen Hunt Biography - Yahoo! Movies". Movies.yahoo.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  69. ^ Jason Hoppin (November 7, 2012). "Bill Monning, Luis Alejo re-elected". Gilroy Dispatch. Gilroy Dispatch. Retrieved 12 June 2017.
  70. ^ "Michael Richards Information". Movietome.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  71. ^ Associated Press (March 31, 1957). "Bucs Option Power Hitter to Hollywood". The Santa Cruz Sentinel. Retrieved 2018-07-06.
  72. ^ "Culver City High Class of 1983 (I)". Cchsa.org. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  73. ^ The Broadway League (1987-09-23). "The official source for Broadway Information". IBDB. Retrieved 2011-11-03.

External links

References

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  2. ^ "Government, City Manager". Culver City. Retrieved January 4, 2015.
  3. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 19, 2017.
  4. ^ "Culver City". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved November 2, 2014.
  5. ^ "Culver City (city) QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on August 17, 2012. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  6. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  7. ^ "USPS - ZIP Code Lookup - Find a ZIP+ 4 Code By City Results". Retrieved 2007-01-18.
  8. ^ "Number Administration System - NPA and City/Town Search Results". Retrieved 2007-01-18.
  9. ^ Lugo Cerra, Julie (1999). Culver City: The Heart of Screenland: An Illustrated History (First ed.). Chatsworth: Windsor Publications. p. 22. ISBN 978-0-89781-441-6.
  10. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  11. ^ "The Native Americans". Culvercity.org. Retrieved 2014-06-22.
  12. ^ a b c Cerra, Julie Lugo (2004). Culver City. Arcadia Publishing. p. 7. ISBN 978-0-7385-2893-9.
  13. ^ laokay: History of Rancho Los Encinos. accessed 8/20/2010
  14. ^ "Prehistoric milling site found in California". Usatoday. Com. 2006-03-04. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  15. ^ "Camp Latham Marker Unveiling". Rootsweb.ancestry.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  16. ^ "The California State Military Museum, Historic California Posts: Fort Moore (Post at Los Angeles, Fort Hill and including Camp Fitzgerald), reprinted with permission from Colonel Herbert M. Hart, USMC (retired), Old Forts of the Far West, published in 1965". Militarymuseum.org. Archived from the original on March 7, 2014. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
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  19. ^ James W. Loewen (September 29, 2005). Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension Of American Racism. The New Press. p. 112. ISBN 978-1-59558-674-2. Retrieved August 19, 2012.
  20. ^ "Culver City Timeline: A Work in Progress". Culver City Historical Society. Retrieved 2017-10-31.
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  22. ^ Herman, Arthur. Freedom's Forge: How American Business Produced Victory in World War II, pp. 277-81, Random House, New York, NY, 2012. ISBN 978-1-4000-6964-4.
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  25. ^ "Culver City Art District".
  26. ^ Brown, Janelle (February 28, 2007). "In Culver City, Calif., Art and Food Turn a Nowhere Into a Somewhere". The New York Times. Retrieved July 24, 2012.
  27. ^ Vincent, Roger. "Culver City evolves from sleepy community to urban center." Los Angeles Times. July 22, 2012. Retrieved on July 5, 2012.
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  32. ^ NPR always seems to be reporting from a town called Culver City. Why? by Paul Farhi for The Washington Post June 29, 2016
  33. ^ "West Los Angeles College".
  34. ^ "The Actors Gang".
  35. ^ "Kirk Douglas Theatre, Los Angeles, Center Theatre Group".
  36. ^ "The Mayme A. Clayton Library & Museum".
  37. ^ "The Wende Museum".
  38. ^ "Neighborhoods (map)". City of Culver City.
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  48. ^ "Statewide Database". UC Regents. Retrieved November 20, 2014.
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  55. ^ "Fire - Culver City, CA". www.culvercity.org.
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  57. ^ a b "Public Transit Ridership, Los Angeles County, California". www.laalmanac.com.
  58. ^ "Our History - Big Blue Bus". www.bigbluebus.com.
  59. ^ "Regular Meeting of the City Council, Culver City July 24, 2017". culver-city.legistar.com. Retrieved 2017-07-24.
  60. ^ "Department of Community Justice | Multnomah County". co.multnomah.or.us. Retrieved 2014-05-03.
  61. ^ "Drew Barrymore (I)". Imdb.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  62. ^ "Seattle Seahawks - Players : Michael Bumpus". Seahawks.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  63. ^ "Gary Carter Baseball Stats". Baseball-almanac.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  64. ^ "Dee Dee Davis (II)". Imdb.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  65. ^ "Jeff Fisher Agent - Speaker Fee - Booking Contact". www.nopactalent.com.
  66. ^ ": Robert Trujillo - Musician Profile". Spirit-of-metal.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  67. ^ "Charles Herbert (I)". Imdb.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  68. ^ "Helen Hunt Biography - Yahoo! Movies". Movies.yahoo.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  69. ^ Jason Hoppin (November 7, 2012). "Bill Monning, Luis Alejo re-elected". Gilroy Dispatch. Gilroy Dispatch. Retrieved 12 June 2017.
  70. ^ "Michael Richards Information". Movietome.com. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  71. ^ Associated Press (March 31, 1957). "Bucs Option Power Hitter to Hollywood". The Santa Cruz Sentinel. Retrieved 2018-07-06.
  72. ^ "Culver City High Class of 1983 (I)". Cchsa.org. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
  73. ^ The Broadway League (1987-09-23). "The official source for Broadway Information". IBDB. Retrieved 2011-11-03.
Baldwin Hills (mountain range)

The Baldwin Hills are a low mountain range surrounded by and rising above the Los Angeles Basin plain in central Los Angeles County, California. The Pacific Ocean is to the west, the Santa Monica Mountains to the north, Downtown Los Angeles to the northeast, and the Palos Verdes Hills to the south - with all easily viewed from the Baldwin Hills.

Centropolis Entertainment

Centropolis Entertainment is a film production company founded in 1985 as Centropolis Film Productions by German film director Roland Emmerich and American film producer Dean Devlin.

As of 2001, the company was a subsidiary of Das Werk AG.

Culver CityBus

Culver CityBus is a public transport agency operating in Culver City, California, currently serving Culver City, the unincorporated community of Marina del Rey, and the adjacent Los Angeles neighborhoods. Its regular fleet is painted bright green and its rapid fleet primarily a chrome gray, distinguishing it from Santa Monica's Big Blue Bus, orange-colored Metro Local buses, and red-colored Metro Rapid buses, whose coverage areas overlap on Los Angeles's Westside.

Fearless Records

Fearless Records is a record label that was founded in 1994. Fearless is based in Culver City, California, and are best known for their early pop punk moments captured in the Fearless Flush Sampler and Punk Bites releases, as well as additional releases by bands such as Bigwig and Dynamite Boy, and later Sugarcult, Plain White T's, The Aquabats, Amely and post-hardcore releases by At the Drive-In and Anatomy of a Ghost. However, the label has experimented with different styles in recent years. Acts like Blessthefall, The Word Alive, Ice Nine Kills, Mayday Parade, Pierce The Veil, and The Color Morale have showcased post-hardcore, metalcore and alternative rock bands that have emerged in recent years. Fearless Records' releases are currently distributed nationwide by RED Distribution, but after Concord Music Group take-over, they'll be distributed by Universal Music Group.

The label was acquired by Concord Bicycle Music in May 2015.

Goldwyn Pictures

Goldwyn Pictures Corporation was an American motion picture production company that operated from 1916 to 1924 when it was merged with two other production companies to form the major studio, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

The studio proved moderately successful, but became most famous due to its iconic Leo the Lion trademark. Although Metro was the nominal survivor, the merged studio inherited Goldwyn's old facility in Culver City, California where it would remain until 1986. The merged studio also retained Goldwyn's Leo the Lion logo.

Lee Shubert of Shubert Theater was an investor in the company.

Gracie Films

Gracie Films is an American independent film and television production company created by James L. Brooks in 1986. The company is primarily responsible for producing the long-running animated series The Simpsons, as well as the films Big, Broadcast News, and Jerry Maguire.

Hillside Memorial Park Cemetery

The Hillside Memorial Park and Mortuary is a Jewish cemetery located at 6001 West Centinela Avenue, in Culver City, California, United States. Many Jews from the entertainment industry are buried here. The cemetery is known for Al Jolson's elaborate tomb (designed by Los Angeles architect Paul Williams), a 75-foot-high pergola and monument atop a hill above a water cascade, all visible from the adjacent San Diego Freeway.

Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City

Holy Cross Cemetery is a Roman Catholic cemetery at 5835 West Slauson Avenue in Culver City, California, operated by the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles.

It is partially in the Culver City city limits.Opened in 1939, Holy Cross comprises 200 acres (81 ha). It contains—amongst others—the graves and tombs of showbusiness professionals. Many celebrities are in the sections near "The Grotto" in the southwest part of the cemetery; after entering the main gate, turn left and follow the leftmost road up the hill.

Holy Cross Cemetery Overland Gate

11298 Playa St, Culver City, CA 90230

https://goo.gl/maps/3zRcLjN1pht

Rocky George

Leonard F. George (born January 9, 1965 in Culver City, California), best known by his stage name Rocky George, is an American guitarist who has been a member of several notable musical acts, including Suicidal Tendencies, where he was their lead guitarist from 1984 to their first breakup in 1995, and was the first African-American member of the band. After Suicidal Tendencies, George played with 40 Cycle Hum and Cro-Mags, and in 2003, he joined Fishbone. George was also a member of a local punk rock band called Pap Smear.

Sony Pictures

Sony Pictures Entertainment Inc. (known simply as Sony Pictures and abbreviated as SPE) is an American entertainment company that produces, acquires and distributes filmed entertainment (theatrical motion pictures, television programs, and recorded videos) through multiple platforms. Through an intermediate holding company called Sony Film Holding Inc., it is operated as a subsidiary of Sony Entertainment Inc., which is itself a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America, a wholly owned subsidiary and the US headquarters of the Tokyo-based multinational technology and media conglomerate Sony Corporation. Based in Culver City, California, it encompasses Sony's motion picture, television production and distribution units. Its group sales in the fiscal year 2017 (April 2017 – March 2018) has been reported to be of $9.133 billion.SPE is a member of the Big Six and the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA).Sony Pictures' film franchises include The Karate Kid, Ghostbusters, Spider-Man, Jumanji, Stuart Little, Men in Black, Underworld, Robert Langdon, The Smurfs (via Peyo), Sniper, Hotel Transylvania, Jumanji, and many more.

Sony Pictures Imageworks

Sony Pictures Imageworks Inc. is a Canadian visual effects and computer animation company headquartered in Vancouver, Canada, with an additional office in Culver City, California. SPI is a unit of Sony Pictures Entertainment's Motion Picture Group.The company has been recognized by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences with Oscars for their work on Spider-Man 2 and the computer-animated short film The ChubbChubbs!, and received many other nominations for their work.

SPI has provided visual effects for many films; most recent include Spider-Man: Homecoming, Kingsman: The Golden Circle, and The Meg. They also provided services for several of director Robert Zemeckis' films, including Contact, Cast Away, The Polar Express, and Beowulf.

Since the foundation of its sister company Sony Pictures Animation in 2002, SPI would go on to animate nearly all of SPA's films, including Open Season, Surf's Up, The Emoji Movie, Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse, and films in the Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs, Smurfs and Hotel Transylvania franchises, in addition to animating films for other studios such as Arthur Christmas for Aardman Animations (co-produced by SPA), Storks and Smallfoot for the Warner Animation Group, and The Angry Birds Movie and its sequel for Rovio Animation.

Sony Pictures Mobile

Sony Pictures Mobile is a mobile entertainment licenser and publisher specialising in branded interactive games and personalisation products, which are available for download via mobile devices through Sony Pictures Mobile's distribution relationships with wireless providers and networks worldwide.

Sony Pictures Mobile is a division of Sony Pictures Digital and a Sony Pictures Entertainment company. Sony Pictures Entertainment is part of Sony Entertainment Inc. a Sony company.

Sony Pictures Studios

The Sony Pictures Studios are an American television and film studio complex located in Culver City, California at 10202 West Washington Boulevard and bounded by Culver Boulevard (south), Washington Boulevard (north), Overland Avenue (west) and Madison Avenue (east). Founded in 1912, the facility is owned by Sony Pictures and houses the division's film studios, such as Columbia Pictures, TriStar Pictures, and Screen Gems. The complex was the original studios of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer from 1924 to 1986.

In addition to films shot at the facility, several television shows have been broadcast live or taped there. The lot, which is open to the public for daily studio tours, currently houses a total of sixteen separate sound stages.

St. Augustine Catholic Church (Culver City, California)

St. Augustine Catholic Church is a Catholic church located in Culver City, California, part of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles. The church is located across the street from the Sony Pictures Studios, previously the MGM Studios.

Strand Releasing

Strand Releasing is an American theatrical distribution company founded in 1989 and is based in Culver City, California. The company has distributed over 300 auteur-driven titles from acclaimed international and American directors such as Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Gregg Araki, François Ozon, Jean-Luc Godard, Catherine Breillat, Claire Denis, Fatih Akin, Aki Kaurismäki, Claude Miller, Manoel de Oliveira, Gaspar Noé, André Téchiné and Terence Davies.

Telepictures

Telepictures (also known as Telepictures Productions; formerly known as Telepictures Distribution and Telepictures Corporation) is an American television and film production company, currently operating as a subsidiary of Warner Bros. Television. Telepictures was established in 1978 by Michael Garin as a television syndication firm.

TriStar Television

TriStar Television (first spelled Tri-Star) is an American television production studio that was launched in 1986 by TriStar Pictures (the studio which is currently owned by Columbia Pictures; CBS was a partner but dropped out in 1985 and HBO in 1986).

Uproxx

Uproxx is an entertainment and popular culture news website. It was founded in 2008 by Jarret Myer and Brian Brater, and acquired by Woven Digital (later renamed Uproxx Media Group) in 2014. The site's target audience is males aged 18–34. It was acquired by Warner Music Group in August 2018, but Myer and CEO Benjamin Blank will remain in control of the company's operations.

Westfield Culver City

Westfield Culver City (formerly known as the Fox Hills Mall), is a shopping mall in Culver City, California, owned by the Westfield Group. Its anchor stores are Best Buy, J.C. Penney, Macy's, Nordstrom Rack, and Target. Westfield America, Inc., a precursor to Westfield Group, acquired the shopping center in 1998 and renamed it "Westfield Shoppingtown Fox Hills", dropping the "Shoppingtown" name in June 2005. The former Robinsons-May department store closed in 2006 and was demolished in 2008 for a new wing including Target and a Best Buy store in 2009.

A transit center is located in the mall's parking lot which is served by Culver City Transit Bus routes 2, 3, 4, 6. The Santa Monica Big Blue Bus routes 12, 14 and Metro Local Bus routes 108, 110, 217, 358.

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