Crime Library

Crime Library was a website documenting major crimes, criminals, trials, forensics, and criminal profiling from books. It was founded in 1998 and was most recently owned by truTV, a cable TV network that is part of Time Warner's Turner Broadcasting System. In August 2014, Crime Library was no longer being updated. In February 2015 the site was taken offline.

Content

Crime Library contained an extensive collection of crime related articles, which were separated into categories: Serial Killers, Notorious Murders, Criminal Mind, Terrorists & Spies and Gangsters & Outlaws. Each category was then broken down into further subcategories. For example, within Serial Killers were the subcategories Most Notorious, Sexual Predators, Truly Weird & Shocking, Unsolved Cases, Partners in Crime and Killers from History. Crime Library also featured photo galleries. These may have had anywhere from 10 to upwards of 100 slides. Some photo galleries were focused on a specific case, while others were lists of crimes linked by a theme (e.g., "Baby for Sale," cases where a person was arrested for allegedly attempting to sell his or her child), or collections of unusual booking photos.

High-profile crimes in the United States were prominent on Crime Library, but the site also contained information about historically notorious characters from various countries, including United Kingdom, Australia and France.

All articles on Crime Library were written exclusively for Crime Library by dozens of commissioned writers, many of them true-crime authors, including Chuck Hustmyre,[1] Katherine Ramsland,[2] Gary C. King[3] and Anthony Bruno.[4]

Crime Library maintained social media features where readers could interact and discuss criminal cases, including a Facebook page, a Twitter account and message boards.

History

Crime Library was founded by Marilyn J. Bardsley[5] in January 1998. Court TV, later truTV, purchased Crime Library in 2001, the same year The Smoking Gun was acquired by Court TV.[6] Originally "The Crime Library," the name of the site was shortened to Crime Library in 2003 to accompany a redesign that changed the site's color scheme and layout.

Crime Library was managed by Editor-in-Chief Andy Brooks and Managing Editors Nastacia Leshchinskaya and Cora Van Olson.

As of August 2014, Crime Library was no longer providing updates on their website. As of 2015, the site is no longer accessible, but its content can be read at the Wayback archive[7] of the site.

References

  1. ^ "Crime writer teaches new fiction writing leisure class". lsureveille.com.
  2. ^ Michael J. Connor (3 November 2014). "The academic legacy of Rulloff, Ithaca's famed 19th Century killer". The Ithaca Voice.
  3. ^ "Dayton Leroy Rogers, Serial Killer With Bizarre Foot Fetish, Could Escape Execution". The Huffington Post.
  4. ^ "'Side-Stepping A Wiretap' - A Tale of the Telling of James 'Whitey' Bulger!". thesop.org.
  5. ^ "Behind Crime Library, personal pain and true horror". The Daily Dot.
  6. ^ Greenman, Catherine. "TECHNOLOGY BRIEFING: E-COMMERCE; COURTTV BUYS 2 WEB SITES". New York Times. Retrieved 3 February 2012.
  7. ^ "Internet Archive Wayback Machine".

External links

Daniel Conahan

Daniel Owen Conahan Jr. (born May 11, 1954) is a convicted American murderer and suspected serial killer. Conahan was convicted of one murder but has been linked to over a dozen murders, mostly of homosexual men in the Charlotte County, Florida area in what came to be known as the Hog Trail Murders.

Edmund Kemper

Edmund Emil Kemper III (born December 18, 1948) is an American serial killer and necrophile who murdered ten people, including his paternal grandparents and mother. He is noted for his large size, at 6 feet 9 inches (2.06 m), and for his high IQ, at 145. Kemper was nicknamed the "Co-ed Killer" as most of his victims were students at co-educational institutions.

Born in California, Kemper had a disturbed childhood. He moved to Montana with his abusive mother at a young age before returning to California, where he murdered his paternal grandparents when he was 15. He was diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic by court psychiatrists and sentenced to the Atascadero State Hospital as a criminally insane juvenile.

Released at the age of 21 after convincing psychiatrists he was rehabilitated, Kemper was regarded as non-threatening by his victims. He targeted young female hitchhikers during his killing spree, luring them into his vehicle and driving them to secluded areas where he would murder them before taking their corpses back to his home to be decapitated, dismembered and violated. Kemper then murdered his mother and one of her friends before turning himself in to the authorities.

Found sane and guilty at his trial in 1973, he requested the death penalty for his crimes. However, capital punishment was suspended in California at the time, and he instead received eight life sentences. Since then, Kemper has been incarcerated in the California Medical Facility. He has waived his right to a parole hearing several times and has said he is "happy" in prison.

Genovese crime family

The Genovese crime family (pronounced [dʒenoˈveːze; -eːse]) is one of the "Five Families" that dominate organized crime activities in New York City and New Jersey as part of the Mafia (or Cosa Nostra). The Genovese crime family are rivaled in size only by the Gambino crime family, and are unmatched in terms of power. They have generally maintained a varying degree of influence over many of the smaller mob families outside New York, including ties with the Philadelphia, Patriarca, and Buffalo crime families.

The current "family" was founded by Charles "Lucky" Luciano, and was known as the Luciano crime family from 1931 to 1957, when it was renamed after boss Vito Genovese. Originally in control of the waterfront on the West Side of Manhattan and the Fulton Fish Market, the family was run for years by "the Oddfather", Vincent "the Chin" Gigante, who feigned insanity by shuffling unshaven through New York's Greenwich Village wearing a tattered bath robe and muttering to himself incoherently to avoid prosecution.

The Genovese family is the oldest and the largest of the "Five Families". Finding new ways to make money in the 21st century, the family took advantage of lax due diligence by banks during the housing bubble with a wave of mortgage frauds. Prosecutors say loan shark victims obtained home equity loans to pay off debts to their mob bankers. The family found ways to use new technology to improve on illegal gambling, with customers placing bets through offshore sites via the Internet.

Although the leadership of the Genovese family seemed to have been in limbo after the death of Gigante in 2005, they appear to be the most organized family and remain powerful. Unique in today's Mafia, the family has benefited greatly from members following "Omertà," a code of conduct emphasizing secrecy and non-cooperation with law enforcement and the justice system. While many mobsters from across the country have testified against their crime families since the 1980s, the Genovese family has only had 8 members turn state's evidence in its history.

Hillside Strangler

The Hillside Strangler, later the Hillside Stranglers, is the media epithet for one, later two American serial killers who terrorized Los Angeles between October 1977 and February 1978, with the nicknames originating from the fact that many of the victims' bodies were discovered in the hills surrounding greater Los Angeles. The police, however, knew because of the positions of the bodies that two individuals were killing together, but withheld this information from the press. These two individuals were discovered to be cousins Kenneth Bianchi and Angelo Buono Jr., who were later convicted of kidnapping, raping, torturing and murdering 10 women and girls ranging in age from 12 to 28 years old.The Hillside Strangler murders began with the deaths of three sex workers who were found strangled and dumped naked on hillsides northeast of Los Angeles between October and early November 1977, but it was not until the deaths of five young women who were not sex workers, but girls who had been abducted from middle-class neighborhoods, that the media attention and subsequent "Hillside Strangler" moniker came to be. There were two more deaths in December and February before the murders abruptly stopped, an extensive investigation proved fruitless until the arrest of Bianchi in January 1979 for the murder of two more young women in Washington State and the subsequent linking of his past to the Strangler case. The most expensive trial in the history of the California legal system at that time followed, with Bianchi and Buono eventually being found guilty of these crimes and sentenced to life imprisonment.

Jeffrey Dahmer

Jeffrey Lionel Dahmer (; May 21, 1960 – November 28, 1994), also known as the Milwaukee Cannibal or the Milwaukee Monster, was an American serial killer and sex offender who committed the rape, murder, and dismemberment of 17 men and boys from 1978 to 1991. Many of his later murders involved necrophilia, cannibalism, and the permanent preservation of body parts—typically all or part of the skeleton.Although he was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder, schizotypal personality disorder, and a psychotic disorder, Dahmer was found to be legally sane at his trial. He was convicted of 15 of the 16 murders he had committed in Wisconsin, and was sentenced to 15 terms of life imprisonment on February 15, 1992. He was later sentenced to a 16th term of life imprisonment for an additional homicide committed in Ohio in 1978.

On November 28, 1994, Dahmer was beaten to death by Christopher Scarver, a fellow inmate at the Columbia Correctional Institution.

Katherine Ramsland

Katherine Ramsland (born 1953) is an American non-fiction author and professor of forensic psychology. Ramsland has written 60 books and more than 1,000 articles, mostly in the genres of crime, forensic science, and the supernatural.

List of serial killers by number of victims

A serial killer is typically a person who murders three or more people, in two or more separate events over a period of time, for primarily psychological reasons. There are gaps of time between the killings, which may range from a few days to months, or many years. This list shows serial killers from the 20th century to present day by number of victims. In many cases, the exact number of victims assigned to a serial killer is not known, and even if that person is convicted of a few, there can be the possibility that they killed many more.

Organization and ranking of serial killings is made difficult by the complex nature of serial killers and incomplete knowledge of the full extent of many killers' crimes. To address this, multiple categories have been provided in order to more accurately describe the nature of certain serial murders. This is not a reflection of an individual's overall rank, which may or may not vary depending on personal opinion concerning the nature and circumstances of their crimes. The fourth column in the table states the number of victims definitely assigned to that particular serial killer, and thus the table is in order of that figure. The fifth column states the number of possible victims the killer could have murdered. Some of these crimes are unsolved, but were included because they are the work of a serial killer, despite nobody being caught.

This list does not necessarily include war criminals or members of democidal governments, such as Adolf Hitler, Hideki Tojo, Mao Zedong, Joseph Stalin, or Pol Pot. Only serial killers with 10 confirmed or suspected murders should be included on this list.

Mark David Chapman

Mark David Chapman (born May 10, 1955) is an American criminal who murdered John Lennon at the entrance to the Dakota apartment building in New York City on December 8, 1980. Chapman fired five shots at Lennon from a Charter Arms .38 caliber revolver, hitting him four times in the back. For the next few minutes, Chapman remained standing and began reading J. D. Salinger's novel The Catcher in the Rye until he was arrested by police. He planned to cite the novel as his manifesto.

Raised in Decatur, Georgia, Chapman had been a fan of the Beatles, but after becoming a born-again Presbyterian, he was incensed by Lennon's much-publicized remark about the group being "more popular than Jesus". In the years leading up to the murder, Chapman developed a series of obsessions, including artwork and the music of Todd Rundgren. The Catcher in the Rye took on great personal significance for Chapman, to the extent that he wished to model his life after the novel's protagonist Holden Caulfield. He also contemplated killing other public figures, including Johnny Carson, Elizabeth Taylor, and Ronald Reagan. At the time of the killing, he had no prior criminal convictions and had just resigned working as a night security guard in Hawaii. His wife was aware of his plans but she did not inform the police or mental health services.

Following the murder, Chapman's legal team intended to mount an insanity defense that would be based on the testimony of mental health experts who said he was in a delusional psychotic state. He was more cooperative with the prosecution team, who argued that his symptoms fell short of a schizophrenia diagnosis. As the trial approached, he instructed his lawyers that he wanted to plead guilty based on what he had decided was the will of God. The judge allowed the plea change and concluded that Chapman was sane, sentencing him to a prison term of 20 years to life with a stipulation that mental health treatment would be provided.

Chapman refused all requests for press interviews during his first six years in prison, later saying he regretted the murder and did not want to give the impression that he killed Lennon for fame and notoriety. He ultimately supplied audio-taped interviews to journalist Jack Jones, who used them to write the investigative book Let Me Take You Down: Inside the Mind of Mark David Chapman in 1992. Two biographical films have been made that center on Chapman and the murder: The Killing of John Lennon (2006) and Chapter 27 (2007). He has been denied parole ten times amidst campaigns against his release after becoming eligible in 2000.

Mary Kay Letourneau

Mary Kay Fualaau (formerly Letourneau; born Mary Katherine Schmitz; January 30, 1962) is an American former schoolteacher who pleaded guilty in 1997 to two counts of felony second-degree rape of a child, her student, Vili Fualaau, who was 12 or 13 at the time. While awaiting sentencing, she gave birth to Fualaau's child. Her plea agreement called for six months in jail, with three months suspended, and no contact with Fualaau for life. The case gained national attention.

Shortly after months in jail, Letourneau was caught by police meeting with Fualaau. The judge found that she was in violation of the conditions of the plea agreement, and revoked her parole, and re-sentenced her to the maximum of seven years in prison. Eight months after returning to prison, she gave birth to Fualaau's second child, another daughter. She was imprisoned from 1998 to 2004. Letourneau and Fualaau married in May 2005.

Murder of David Lynn Harris

David Lynn Harris was an American orthodontist who owned a chain of offices along with his wife, Clara Suarez Harris. The chain was particularly successful, and the couple were able to afford an upscale home and lifestyle in Friendswood, Texas. On July 24, 2002, Clara Harris confronted her husband in a hotel parking lot over an extramarital affair, then struck and ran over him with her Mercedes-Benz sedan, killing him. She was convicted of sudden passion and sentenced to twenty years in prison.

Murder of Sylvia Likens

The murder of Sylvia Likens is a child murder which occurred in Indianapolis, Indiana in October 1965 and in which a 16-year-old girl was held captive and subjected to increasing levels of child abuse, neglect, humiliation, and torture committed over a period of three months by her caregiver, Gertrude Baniszewski, many of Baniszewski's children, and several other neighborhood children before ultimately succumbing to her injuries on October 26.

Baniszewski, her oldest daughter, Paula, her son John, and two neighborhood youths, Coy Hubbard and Richard Hobbs, were tried and convicted of neglecting, torturing, and murdering Sylvia in separate trials held in 1966, with the prosecutor at Gertrude Baniszewski's trial describing the case as the "most terrible crime ever [to be] committed in the state of Indiana", with Sylvia having been subjected to acts of "degradation that you wouldn't commit on a dog".The torture and murder of Sylvia Likens is widely regarded by many Indiana citizens as the worst crime ever committed in their state, and has been described by a senior investigator in the Indianapolis Police Department as the "most sadistic" case he ever investigated in the 35 years he served with the Indianapolis police.

Ronald DeFeo Jr.

Ronald Joseph "Butch" DeFeo Jr. (born September 26, 1951) is an American mass murderer. He was tried and convicted for the 1974 killings of his father, mother, two brothers, and two sisters. The case inspired the book and film versions of The Amityville Horror.

Serial killer

A serial killer is typically a person who murders three or more people, usually in service of abnormal psychological gratification, with the murders taking place over more than a month and including a significant period of time between them. Different authorities apply different criteria when designating serial killers. While most set a threshold of three murders, others extend it to four or lessen it to two. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) defines serial killing as "a series of two or more murders, committed as separate events, usually, but not always, by one offender acting alone".Although psychological gratification is the usual motive for serial killing, and most serial killings involve sexual contact with the victim, the FBI states that the motives of serial killers can include anger, thrill-seeking, financial gain, and attention seeking. The murders may be attempted or completed in a similar fashion. The victims may have something in common, for example, demographic profile, appearance, gender or race. A serial killer is neither a mass murderer, nor a spree killer, although there may be conceptual overlaps between serial killers and spree killers.

Sing Sing

Sing Sing Correctional Facility is a maximum security prison operated by the New York State Department of Corrections and Community Supervision in the village of Ossining, New York. It is located about 30 miles (48 km) north of New York City on the east bank of the Hudson River. Sing Sing contains about 1,700 prisoners."Sing Sing" was derived from the "Sinck Sinck" (or "Sint Sinck") Indian tribe from whom the land was purchased in 1685. In 1970, the name was changed to the "Ossining Correctional Facility," but it reverted to its original name in 1985. There are plans to convert the original 1825 cell block into a time-specific museum.The prison property is bisected by the Metro-North Railroad's four-track Hudson Line.

St. Martin's Press

St. Martin's Press is a book publisher headquartered in the Flatiron Building in Manhattan, New York City. St. Martin's Press is considered one of the largest English-language publishers. Bringing to the public some 700 titles a year under eight imprints.

The imprints include St. Martin's Press (mainstream and bestseller books), St. Martin's Griffin (mainstream paperback books, including science fiction and romance), Minotaur (mystery, suspense, and thrillers), Picador (specialty books), Thomas Dunne Books (suspense and mainstream), and All Points Books (politics).

St. Martin's Press's current editor in chief is George Witte.

Texas Seven

The Texas 7 were a group of prisoners who escaped from the John B. Connally Unit near Kenedy, Texas, on December 13, 2000. Six of the seven were apprehended over a month later, between January 21–23, 2001, as a direct result of the television show America's Most Wanted. One of them committed suicide before he could be arrested. The surviving members were all convicted and sentenced to death for the murder of Irving, Texas police officer Aubrey Wright Hawkins, who was murdered when responding to a robbery perpetrated by the Texas Seven. Four have since been executed.

The Bugs and Meyer Mob

The Bugs (Bugsy) and Meyer Mob was a Jewish-American street gang in Manhattan, New York City's Lower East Side. It was formed and headed by mobsters Bugsy Siegel and Meyer Lansky during their teenage years shortly after the start of Prohibition. The Bugs and Meyer mob acted as a predecessor to Murder, Inc.

The Purple Gang

The Purple Gang, also known as the Sugar House Gang, was a criminal mob of bootleggers and hijackers, with predominantly Jewish members. They operated in Detroit, Michigan during the 1920s and came to be Detroit's dominant criminal gang, but ultimately excessive violence and in-fighting caused the gang to destroy itself in the 1930s.

Yakuza

Yakuza (Japanese: ヤクザ, IPA: [jaꜜkɯza]), also known as gokudō (極道, "the extreme path", IPA: [gokɯꜜdoː]) are members of transnational organized crime syndicates originating in Japan. The Japanese police, and media by request of the police, call them bōryokudan (暴力団, "violent groups", IPA: [boːɾʲokɯꜜdaɴ]), while the Yakuza call themselves ninkyō dantai (任侠団体/仁侠団体, "chivalrous organizations", IPA: [ɲiŋkʲoː dantai]). The Western equivalent for the term Yakuza is gangster, meaning an individual involved in a Mafia-like criminal organization. The Yakuza are notorious for their strict codes of conduct, their organized fiefdom nature, and several unconventional ritual practices such as "Yubitsume". Yakuza members are often described as males with heavily tattooed bodies and slicked hair, yet this group is still regarded as being among "the most sophisticated and wealthiest criminal organizations."At their height, the Yakuza maintained a large presence in the Japanese media and operated internationally. In fact, in the early 1960s police estimated that the Yakuza had a membership of 184,100. However, in recent years their numbers have dwindled with the latest figure from the National Police Agency estimating that as of 2016 the number of members in all 22 designated gangs was 39,100. This decline is often attributed to changing market opportunities and several legal and social developments in Japan which discourage the growth of Yakuza membership. Yet, despite their dwindling numbers, the Yakuza still regularly engage in an array of criminal activities, and many Japanese citizens remain fearful of the threat these individuals pose to their safety. However, there remains no strict prohibition on Yakuza membership in Japan today, although much legislation has been passed by the Japanese government aimed at increasing liability for criminal activities and impeding revenue.

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