Craig Newsome

Craig Newsome (born August 10, 1971) is a former NFL cornerback who was drafted in the first round of the NFL draft by the Green Bay Packers, where he played for four years. He won Super Bowl XXXI with the Packers, beating the New England Patriots. He was later traded to the San Francisco 49ers in 1999.[1]

Craig Newsome
No. 21
Position:Cornerback
Personal information
Born:August 10, 1971 (age 47)
San Bernardino, California
Career information
High school:Rialto (CA) Eisenhower
College:Arizona State
NFL Draft:1995 / Round: 1 / Pick: 32
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
INT:4
INT yards:51
Games:53
Player stats at NFL.com

Amateur career

He played for Eisenhower High School in Rialto, CA with Ronnie Lott and attended San Bernardino Valley College and later transferred to Arizona State University. He has three children. Garrett Newsome, Alexis Newsome, and Alena Newsome. They live in Holmen, Wisconsin with their mother Tara Johnson Newsome, who competed at Miss USA as Miss Wisconsin USA 1997. Garrett currently attends The Ohio State University. Alexis will be attending Xavier University on a volleyball scholarship in the fall of 2013. Alena attends Pickerington Central High School

NFL career

The Packers drafted Newsome with the 32nd pick in the 1995 NFL Draft. He was the starting cornerback on the 1996 Green Bay Packers championship team. He also had a forced fumble and an interception in Super Bowl XXXI. On September 19, 1999 the Packers traded Newsome to the 49ers.

Post NFL Career

Newsome coached the La Crosse River Rats of the Indoor Football League in 2000, located in La Crosse Wisconsin. He currently resides in Holmen, Wisconsin where he is a coach on the Holmen High School football team, where his son Craig Newsome Jr. plays.

References

  1. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/N/NewsCr20.htm

External links

1993 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1993 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pac-12 Conference teams for the 1993 Pacific-10 Conference football season. The UCLA Bruins, Arizona Wildcats, and USC Trojans could all claim a conference championship, posting 6–2 conference records. UCLA wide receiver J. J. Stokes was voted Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Year. Arizona defensive tackle Rob Waldrop was voted Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year.

1993 Pacific-10 Conference football season

The Pacific-10 Conference football season in 1993 ended in a three-way tie for first place between the UCLA Bruins, USC Trojans, and Arizona Wildcats. UCLA won 27–21 over their crosstown rival, USC, to earn the conference's bid to the 1994 Rose Bowl.

1995 Green Bay Packers season

The 1995 Green Bay Packers season was their 77th season overall and their 75th in the National Football League. The Packers obtained an 11–5 mark in the regular season and won the NFC Central, their first division title since 1972. In the playoffs, the Packers defeated the Atlanta Falcons at home and the defending champion San Francisco 49ers on the road before losing to the Dallas Cowboys in the NFC Championship Game. Packers' quarterback Brett Favre was named the NFL's Most Valuable Player, the first of three such awards he would win.

This was the first season that the Packers played home games exclusively at Lambeau Field, after playing part of their home slate at Milwaukee County Stadium since 1953. After losing their home opener to St. Louis, the Packers would win an NFL-record 25 consecutive home games between the rest of 1995 and early in 1998.

1995 NFL Draft

The 1995 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 22–23, 1995 at the Paramount Theatre at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York. At the time of the draft, the Raiders were still based in Los Angeles. They would officially return to Oakland after a 13-year hiatus in July 1995. Additionally, the former Los Angeles Rams had gotten approval to move to St. Louis shortly before the draft on April 13 (they would return to Los Angeles in 2016). The league also held a supplemental draft after the regular draft and before the regular season.

There were 32 picks in the first round of this draft as the two expansion teams each received two extra picks between the first and second rounds. The Carolina Panthers, having selected second in the 1995 NFL Expansion Draft, were awarded the first overall pick in this draft and the Jacksonville Jaguars, having picked first in the expansion draft, selected second. The Panthers, however, traded their number one pick to the Cincinnati Bengals for the Bengals' fifth overall pick and their fourth pick in the second round. The Panthers were also stripped of two later supplemental picks, numbers 61 and 191, for improperly recruiting the Pittsburgh Steelers Defensive Coordinator, Dom Capers, as their Head Coach.This marked only the third time to date in NFL History that two Hall of Fame players were selected by the same team in the same round (the other being the Bears in 1965 draft and the Ravens in the 1996 NFL Draft.) The Tampa Bay Buccaneers selected Warren Sapp with the 12th overall pick and Derrick Brooks with the 28th overall pick. The two future Hall of Famers would go on to lead a strong defense which contributed heavily to the win in Super Bowl XXXVII.

1995 San Francisco 49ers season

The 1995 San Francisco 49ers season was the team's 46th year with the National Football League, and 50th season of overall existence.

Fresh from their trip to the Super Bowl, the 49ers lost cornerback Deion Sanders to Dallas and running back Ricky Watters to Philadelphia. Despite a mediocre 5–4 start, the 49ers went 11–5 and for the fourth straight time, they repeated as NFC West champions. The 49ers finished the season as the league's top scoring offense, averaging 28.6 points per game. They also finished number one in total defense, surrendering just 275 yards per game, along with being the top rushing defense and finishing second in points allowed. However, a stunning 27–17 loss to Brett Favre and the Green Bay Packers in the Divisional Game stripped the 49ers of their title defense. This would be the first of three consecutive seasons that the Packers ended the 49ers' season.

Jerry Rice had his best season, catching a career-high 122 receptions along with 1,848 receiving yards and 15 total touchdowns.

It was also the final season the 49ers wore their Super Bowl era uniforms.

1996 Green Bay Packers season

The 1996 Green Bay Packers season was their 78th season overall and their 76th in the National Football League, which culminated with the franchise winning its third Super Bowl and league-record 12th NFL Championship. The Packers posted a league-best 13–3 regular season won-loss record, going 8–0 at home and 5–3 on the road. It was the first time since 1962 that the club went undefeated at home. Additionally, the Packers had the NFL's highest-scoring offense (456) and allowed the fewest points on defense (210). Green Bay was the first team to accomplish both feats in the same season since the undefeated 1972 Miami Dolphins. They finished the season with the number one ranked offense, defense, and special teams. They also set a then NFL record for the fewest touchdowns allowed in a 16-game season, with 19. The Packers also allowed the fewest yards in the NFL and set a record for punt return yardage. Brett Favre won his second straight MVP award while also throwing for a career-high and league leading 39 touchdown passes.

In the postseason, the Packers defeated the San Francisco 49ers in the divisional round and the Carolina Panthers in the NFC Championship Game. Green Bay beat the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XXXI to win their third Super Bowl and twelfth NFL Championship.In 2007, the 1996 Packers were ranked as the 16th greatest Super Bowl champions on the NFL Network's documentary series America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions. The 1996 Packers were ranked 6th-greatest Super Bowl team of all-time by a similar panel done by ESPN and released in 2007. As of 2019, the Packers are the only team since the implementation of the salary cap to score the most points and allow the fewest in the regular season.

1997 Green Bay Packers season

The 1997 Green Bay Packers season was their 79th season overall and their 77th in the National Football League. The season concluded with the team winning its second consecutive NFC championship, but losing in a 31–24 upset to John Elway's Denver Broncos in Super Bowl XXXII. The team narrowly missed its opportunity to post back-to-back Super Bowl wins.

After a dominating 1996 campaign which ended with a victory in Super Bowl XXXI, many expected the Packers to repeat as champions in 1997. During training camp, star safety LeRoy Butler, among others, said that the Packers had the chance to run the table and go 19–0. This opinion drew increased coverage from the media as the Packers notched impressive victories in all five preseason games. The undefeated hype ended quickly, however, when Green Bay lost week 2 in Philadelphia.

Following a relatively slow 3–2 start, the Packers caught fire in the second half of the season, finishing with a 13–3 regular season record and 8–0 home record for the second consecutive year. In the playoffs, Green Bay defeated the Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Lambeau Field in the divisional round, and San Francisco 49ers at 3Com Park in the NFC Championship. Some in the media dubbed the NFC title game as "the real Super Bowl" because of the 49ers' and Packers' league dominance, and the relative inferiority of the AFC in recent Super Bowls. Green Bay's win marked the third consecutive year the team had defeated San Francisco in the playoffs.

The Packers entered Super Bowl XXXII as 11 1/2-point favorites. The point spread was likely determined by Green Bay's victory in the previous Super Bowl, the AFC's string of 13 consecutive Super Bowl losses, and Denver's losses in four previous Super Bowls. The game itself was a seesaw battle, and one of the most exciting Super Bowls in history. The Broncos won the thriller 31–24, earning John Elway his first Super Bowl victory at the age of 37, and the first championship in franchise history. Years later, Brett Favre said the Broncos were far underrated, and credited Denver's innovative blitz packages and strategies, foreign to the league at that time, for confusing the Packers.

Packers' quarterback Brett Favre was named the league's MVP for the third year in a row in 1997. Favre was the first player in the history of the award to win three MVPs, and remains the only player to have won three MVPs consecutively. The Packers became the first team to have six NFL MVP award winners.The 1997 Packers are one of only two teams in NFL history to win seven games against teams that would go on to make the playoffs.

1998 Green Bay Packers season

The 1998 Green Bay Packers season was their 80th season overall and their 78th in the National Football League. It ended with a 30–27 loss in the NFC Wild Card Game to the San Francisco 49ers, with Steve Young throwing a 25-yard touchdown pass to Terrell Owens with three seconds left. The season marked the end of an era in many ways for Green Bay; this was the last season for which both head coach Mike Holmgren and Hall of Fame defensive end Reggie White would find themselves on the Packers' sideline. This was the first time the Packers had not won the division in four years. In addition, the Minnesota Vikings brought an end to the Packers 25 game home winning streak in Week 5.

1998 was the final season that the Packers would qualify for the postseason during the 1990s. They would not return to the playoffs until 2001.

1999 Green Bay Packers season

The 1999 Green Bay Packers season was their 81st season overall and their 79th in the National Football League. It was the first and only season for head coach Ray Rhodes. The Packers finished 8–8, posting their worst record since Brett Favre took over the helm as the Packers' starting quarterback.

Holmen, Wisconsin

Holmen is a village in La Crosse County, Wisconsin, United States. The population was 9,005 as of the census of 2010. It is part of the La Crosse-Onalaska, WI-MN Metropolitan Statistical Area.

La Crosse River Rats

The La Crosse River Rats were an indoor football team based in La Crosse, Wisconsin. They were members of the original Indoor Football League (IFL) and played their home games at the La Crosse Center.

List of Arizona State Sun Devils in the NFL draft

This is a list of Arizona State Sun Devils football players who were drafted into the NFL.

List of Green Bay Packers first-round draft picks

The Green Bay Packers joined the National Football League (NFL) in 1921, two years after their original founding by Curly Lambeau. They participated in the first ever NFL draft in 1936 and selected Russ Letlow, a guard from the University of San Francisco. The team's most recent first round selection was Jaire Alexander, a cornerback from Louisville in the 2018 NFL Draft. The Packers have selected the number one overall pick in the draft twice, choosing future Hall of Fame halfback Paul Hornung in 1957 and quarterback Randy Duncan in 1959. They have also selected the second overall pick three times and the third overall pick once. The team's eight selections from the University of Minnesota are the most chosen by the Packers from one university.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft officially known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting" but more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Playoff teams will not pick before a non playoff team when determining the initial draft order. So a division winner with a losing record would have a lower pick after a 10-6 team that didn't make the playoffs. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

List of San Francisco 49ers players

These players have appeared in at least one regular season or postseason game for the San Francisco 49ers NFL franchise.

List of people from San Bernardino, California

The following is a list of notable people from San Bernardino, California.

Newsome (surname)

Not to be confused with NewsomNewsome is a surname, and may refer to:

Alex Newsome, rugby union player

Bree Newsome, American activist and filmmaker

Craig Newsome (born 1971), former American football player

Detrez Newsome (born 1994), American football player

Dick Newsome (1909–1965), American Major League Baseball player

Jon Newsome (born 1970), English former soccer player

Kevin Newsome (born 1991), American football player

Ozzie Newsome (born 1956), former American football player

Paula Newsome, American actress

Peter Newsome (born 1943), English glass sculptor

Super Bowl XXXI

Super Bowl XXXI was an American football game between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion New England Patriots and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Green Bay Packers to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 1996 season. The Packers defeated the Patriots by the score of 35–21, earning their third overall Super Bowl victory, and their first since Super Bowl II. The Packers also extended their league record for the most overall NFL championships to 12. It was also the last in a run of 13 straight Super Bowl victories by the NFC over the AFC. The game was played on January 26, 1997 at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana.

This Super Bowl featured two clubs that had recently returned to competitiveness. After 24 mostly dismal seasons since Vince Lombardi left, the Packers' fortunes turned after head coach Mike Holmgren and quarterback Brett Favre joined the team in 1992. After four losing seasons, the Patriots' rise began in 1993 when Bill Parcells was hired as head coach, and the team drafted quarterback Drew Bledsoe. Under their respective head coaches and quarterbacks, Green Bay posted an NFC-best 13–3 regular season record in 1996, while New England advanced to their second Super Bowl after recording an 11–5 record.

The game began with the teams combining for 24 first-quarter points, the most in Super Bowl history. The Packers then scored 17 unanswered points in the second quarter, including Favre's then-Super Bowl record 81-yard touchdown pass to wide receiver Antonio Freeman. In the third quarter, the Patriots cut the lead to 27–21 off of running back Curtis Martin's 18-yard rushing touchdown. But on the ensuing kickoff, Desmond Howard returned the ball a then-Super Bowl record 99 yards for a touchdown. The score proved to be the last one, as both teams' defenses took over the rest of the game. Howard became the first special teams player ever to be named Super Bowl MVP. He gained a total of 154 kickoff return yards, and also recorded a then-Super Bowl record 90 punt return yards, thus tying the then-Super Bowl records of total return yards (244) and combined net yards gained (244).

This was the first Super Bowl broadcast by Fox under its first contract to carry NFL games. By a large margin it was the highest-rated program aired in the network's history at the time.

Tyrone Williams (cornerback)

Upton Tyrone Williams (born May 31, 1973 in Bradenton, Florida) is a former American football cornerback in the National Football League for the Green Bay Packers, Atlanta Falcons and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at the University of Nebraska.

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