Cover art

Cover art is a type of artwork presented as an illustration or photograph on the outside of a published product such as a book (often on a dust jacket), magazine, newspaper (tabloid), comic book, video game (box art), DVD, CD, videotape, or music album (album art). The art has a primarily commercial function, for instance to promote the product it is displayed on, but can also have an aesthetic function, and may be artistically connected to the product, such as with art by the creator of the product.[1][2]

Album cover art

Album cover art is artwork created for a music album. Notable album cover art includes Pink Floyd's The Dark Side of the Moon, King Crimson's In the Court of the Crimson King, the Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, Abbey Road and their "White Album" among others. Albums can have cover art created by the musician, as with Joni Mitchell's Clouds,[3] or by an associated musician, such as Bob Dylan's artwork for the cover of Music From Big Pink, by the Band, Dylan's backup band's first album. Artists known for their album cover art include Alex Steinweiss, an early pioneer in album cover art, Roger Dean, and the Hipgnosis studio. Some album art may cause controversy because of nudity, offending churches, trademark or others.[4] There have been numerous books documenting album cover art, particularly rock and jazz album covers.[5][6][7] Steinweiss was an art director and graphic designer who brought custom artwork to record album covers and invented the first packaging for long-playing records.[4]

Book cover

Whether printed on the dust jacket of a hardcover book, or on the cover of a paperback, book cover art has had books written on the subject.[8]  Numerous artists have become noted for their book cover art, including Richard M. Powers and Chip Kidd.  In one of the most recognizable book covers in American literature, two sad female eyes (and bright red lips) adrift in the deep blue of a night sky, hover ominously above a skyline that glows like a carnival.  Evocative of sorrow and excess, the haunting image has become so inextricably linked to The Great Gatsby that it still adorns the cover of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s masterpiece 88 years after its debut. The iconic cover art was created by Spanish artist Francis Cugat.  With the release of a big Hollywood movie, however, some printings of the book have abandoned the classic cover in favor of one that ties in more closely with the film. [9] [10]

Magazine cover

Magazine cover artists include Art Spiegelman, who modernized the look of The New Yorker magazine, and his predecessor Rea Irvin, who created the Eustace Tilly iconic character for the magazine.

Tabloid cover

Today the word tabloid is used as a somewhat derogatory descriptor of a style of journalism, rather than its original intent as an indicator of half-broadsheet size. This tends to cloud the fact that the great tabloids were skilfully produced amalgams of intriguing human interest stories told with punchy brevity, a clarity drawn from the choice of simple but effective words and often with a healthy dose of wit.[11]  The gossipy tabloid scandal sheets, as we know them today, have been around since 1830. That's when Benjamin Day and James Gordon Bennett Sr., the respective publishers of The New York Sun and The New York Herald, launched what became known as the Penny Press (whose papers sold for one cent apiece).[12]  But some of the world's best journalism has been tabloid.[13]  From the days when John Pilger revealed the cold truth of Cambodia's Killing Fields in the Daily Mirror, to the stream of revelations that showed the hypocrisy of John Major's "back to basics" cabinet, award-winning writing in the tabloids is acknowledged every year at the National Press Awards.[13]  Good cover art can lead readers to this fact; the New York Herald, for example, offers some fine examples of tabloid cover art.[14] [15]  So too does the News & Review, a free weekly published in Reno, Nevada, Chico, California and Sacramento, California. [16]  The tabloid has thrived since the 1970s, and even uses cartoonish cover art. [17]  Tabloids have a modern role to play, and along with good cover art (and new ideas) they fill a niche.[18]

Popular music scores (early 20th century)

Sheet music cover artists include Frederick S. Manning, William Austin Starmer, and Frederick Waite Starmer, all three of whom worked for Jerome H. Remick. Other prolific artists included Albert Wilfred Barbelle, André De Takacs, and Gene Buck.

Gallery

Ivory book cover MS Douce 176

Ivory book cover with scenes from the life of Christ circa 800 AD

Title design of A song of the English (1909)

Illustration to an edition of Kipling's A song of the English (1909)

AmazingMan22

Cover of Amazing Man Comics 22 (May, 1941).Art by Paul Gustavson.

OlympicClubTimesDemocratHeadline

Gentleman Jim Corbett and John L. Sullivan at Olympic Club, New Orleans

Vanity Fair June 1914

Cover art for Vanity Fair magazine

Vanity Fair cover by Ethel Caroline Rundquist 1916

Skater with scarf. January 1916 Vanity Fair cover by Ethel Caroline Rundquist.

The Spider April 1934

Cover of the pulp magazine The Spider (April 1934, vol. 2, no. 3)

LIFE 06191944 Eisenhower cover

LIFE magazine, Time Inc., Official U. S. Army Photo in cover

TheBeatles68LP

Album cover for The Beatles' "White Album", 1968

Mitrohin for Zamiatin's Uezdnoe

Book cover for Uezdnoe, by Yevgeny Zamyatin, 1916

RealMotherGoose

Book cover for The Real Mother Goose, 1916, Blanche Fisher Wright, illustrator

Beyoncé - Beyoncé

Album cover for Beyoncé's self-titled album, 2013

MisterMystery12

Comic book cover for Mister Mystery #1

Billboard02 10thAnniv

Cover for (the) Billboard Magazine's tenth anniversary edition, 1904

Horisont 1 1967 kaas

Cover for the first Horisont magazine in Estonia, 1967

Queen & David Bowie - Under Pressure.jpeg

Cover for Queen and David Bowie's single "Under Pressure", 1981

See also

References

  1. ^ "Examples @ Pinterest".
  2. ^ "Jacek Utko".
  3. ^ "Clouds". JoniMitchell.com. Les Irvin. Retrieved 8 June 2014.
  4. ^ a b Heller, Steven, "Alex Steinweiss, Originator of Artistic Album Covers, Dies at 94," New York Times, July 19, 2011
  5. ^ "The Blues: Album Cover Art", Chronicle Books, 1996
  6. ^ 1000 Record Covers, Michael Ochs, Taschen Publications, 2005
  7. ^ Borgerson, Janet (2017). Designed for hi-fi living : the vinyl LP in midcentury America. Schroeder, Jonathan E., 1962-. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press. ISBN 9780262036238. OCLC 958205262.
  8. ^ "Sample Book List".
  9. ^ "Smithsonian Magazine".
  10. ^ "2013 Film".
  11. ^ Day, Mark. (2008, August 21). “For a brighter future, tabloids could look to the past.” The Australian, p. 38.
  12. ^ McLaren, Leah. (2001, August 11). “Admit it: Tabloid culture is what we are” The Globe and Mail, p. L3.
  13. ^ a b Wynne-Jones, Ros. (2011, July 28). “They've still got news for us.” Independent Extra, p. 2.
  14. ^ "Siouxland Observer".
  15. ^ "Herald Cover Art".
  16. ^ "News & Review".
  17. ^ "Chico Archive".
  18. ^ Berlin, Jess S. (2006, November 8). “Cyber tabloid will cover all the news that's virtually true.” The Guardian, p. 20.

External links

A Collection of Great Dance Songs

A Collection of Great Dance Songs is a compilation album by English rock band Pink Floyd. It was released on 23 November 1981 in the United Kingdom by Harvest Records and in the United States by Columbia Records.

A Nice Pair

A Nice Pair is a compilation album by Pink Floyd, re-issuing their first two albums—The Piper at the Gates of Dawn and A Saucerful of Secrets—in a new gatefold sleeve. The album was released in December 1973 by Harvest and Capitol in the United States and the following month in the United Kingdom by Harvest and EMI. It reached number 36 in the US Billboard album charts, and was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) in March 1994.

A Saucerful of Secrets

A Saucerful of Secrets is the second studio album by the English rock band Pink Floyd, released on 29 June 1968 by EMI Columbia in the United Kingdom (following adverts in Melody Maker giving that date) and released on 27 July 1968 in the United States by Tower Records. The album was recorded before and after Syd Barrett's departure from the group. With Barrett's behaviour becoming increasingly unpredictable, he was forced to leave the band and David Gilmour was recruited in January 1968.As a result, A Saucerful of Secrets became the only non-compilation Pink Floyd album on which all five band members appeared, the first for Gilmour, with him appearing on six songs (all except "Jugband Blues"), and the last for Barrett, with him on three ("Remember a Day", "Jugband Blues" and "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun"). Despite the reference that Gilmour had appeared on six songs, it is actually only five because he was not present on Wright's "Remember a Day" that Barrett played on (the song was recorded in October 1967 before Gilmour was asked to join the band as a fifth member). "Set the Controls for the Heart of the Sun" was the only song all five members appeared on together. The band's drummer, Nick Mason, has declared A Saucerful of Secrets to be his favourite Pink Floyd album.Upon release, A Saucerful of Secrets reached number nine in the UK charts, but failed to chart at all in the US, being the band's only studio album to do so. The album received mostly positive reviews, though many critics have deemed it inferior to The Piper at the Gates of Dawn.

Abraxas (album)

Abraxas is the second studio album by Latin rock band Santana. It was released on September 23, 1970.

Album cover

An album cover is the front of the packaging of a commercially released audio recording product, or album. The term can refer to either the printed cardboard covers typically used to package sets of 10 in (25 cm) and 12 in (30 cm) 78-rpm records, single and sets of 12 in (30 cm) LPs, sets of 45 rpm records (either in several connected sleeves or a box), or the front-facing panel of a CD package, and, increasingly, the primary image accompanying a digital download of the album, or of its individual tracks.

In the case of all types of tangible records, it also serves as part of the protective sleeve.

Animals (Pink Floyd album)

Animals is the tenth studio album by English rock band Pink Floyd. It was first released on 23 January 1977 by Harvest Records in the United Kingdom and by Columbia Records in the United States. It is a concept album that provides a scathing critique of the social-political conditions of late 1970s Britain, and presents a marked change in musical style from their earlier work. Animals was recorded at the band's Britannia Row Studios in London, but its production was punctuated by the early signs of discord that, three years later, would culminate in keyboardist Richard Wright leaving the band. The album's cover image shows an inflatable pig floating between two chimneys of the Battersea Power Station, was conceived by the band's bassist and lead songwriter Roger Waters, and was designed by long-time collaborator Storm Thorgerson.

The album was released to generally positive reviews in the United Kingdom, where it reached number 2 on the UK Albums Chart. It was also a success in the United States, reaching number 3 on the US Billboard 200. It scored on US charts for half a year and these steady sales have resulted in its certification by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) at 4x platinum. The size of the venues of the band's In the Flesh Tour prompted an incident in which Waters spat at members of the audience in Montreal, setting the background for the band's next studio album The Wall, released two years later.

Atom Heart Mother

Atom Heart Mother is the fifth studio album by the English progressive rock band Pink Floyd. It was released by Harvest on 2 October 1970 in the UK, and by Capitol on 10 October 1970 in the US. It was recorded at Abbey Road Studios in London, England, and was the band's first album to reach number 1 in the UK, while it reached number 55 in the US, eventually going gold there. A remastered CD was released in 1994 in the UK and the United States, and again in 2011. Ron Geesin, who had already influenced and collaborated with Roger Waters, contributed to the title track and received a then-rare outside songwriting credit.

The cover was designed by Hipgnosis, and was the first one to not feature the band's name on the cover, or contain any photographs of the band anywhere. This was a trend that would continue on subsequent covers throughout the 1970s and beyond.

Although it was commercially successful on release, the band, particularly Waters and David Gilmour, have expressed several negative opinions of the album in more recent years. Nevertheless, it remained popular enough for Gilmour to perform the title track with Geesin in 2008.

Different Seasons

Different Seasons (1982) is a collection of four Stephen King novellas with a more serious dramatic bent than the horror fiction for which King is famous. The four novellas are tied together via subtitles that relate to each of the four seasons. The collection is notable for having had three of its four novellas turned into Hollywood films, one of which, The Shawshank Redemption, was nominated for the 1994 Academy Award for Best Picture.

Discovery (Pink Floyd box set)

Pink Floyd: Discovery is a compilation box set by Pink Floyd released on 26 September 2011 to launch the Why Pink Floyd...? re-release campaign. The box set includes all of their standard studio albums, except for The Endless River, which would not be released for another three years. All albums were newly remastered by James Guthrie. In addition to the albums the set comes with a 60-page artwork booklet designed by Storm Thorgerson.

List of WWE 2K Games video games

WWE 2K Games (formerly WWF SmackDown!, WWE SmackDown!, WWE SmackDown vs. Raw, and WWE Games) is a series of professional wrestling video games based on the American professional wrestling promotion WWE. The series was first published by THQ until 2013, when Take-Two Interactive's 2K Sports took over. Games in the series are primarily developed by the Japanese based company, Yuke's. The series was published by Yuke's and known as Exciting Pro Wrestling in Japan until 2005. Following SmackDown vs. Raw 2007, THQ took over as the Japanese publisher and the series adopted the western name. Initially, the series was exclusive to PlayStation video game consoles, and was featured in all of the seventh generation consoles by 2008. The SmackDown! series is among the best-selling video game franchises with 47 million copies shipped as of 2009. The game engine for the series is based on that used by the Japanese professional wrestling video game series, Toukon Retsuden and Rumble Roses, a fictional professional wrestling series, both developed by Yuke's. THQ and Yuke's Future Media Creators consider one reason the series has remained so popular is due to series bringing "WWE programming to life through a host of key new features, extensive rosters with WWE's most popular Superstars, incredible graphics and engaging action in and beyond the ring."

Meddle

Meddle is the sixth studio album by English progressive rock group Pink Floyd, released on 31 October 1971 by Harvest Records. It was produced between the band's touring commitments, from January to August 1971. The album was recorded at a series of locations around London, including Abbey Road Studios and Morgan Studios.

With no material to work with and no clear idea of the album's direction, the group devised a series of novel experiments which eventually inspired the album's signature track, "Echoes". Although the band's later albums would be unified by a central theme with lyrics written entirely by Roger Waters, Meddle was a group effort with lyrical contributions from each member, and is considered a transitional album between the Syd Barrett-influenced group of the late 1960s and the emerging Pink Floyd. The cover has been explained by its creator, Storm Thorgerson, to be an ear underwater. As with several previous albums designed by Hipgnosis, though, Thorgerson was unhappy with the final result.

The album was well-received by music critics upon its release, and was commercially successful in the United Kingdom, but lackluster publicity on the part of their United States-based label led to poor sales there upon initial release.

More (soundtrack)

More (released in the United States as Original Motion Picture Soundtrack from the film More) is the first soundtrack album and third studio album by English rock band Pink Floyd. It was released on 13 June 1969 in the United Kingdom by EMI Columbia and on 9 August 1969 in the United States by Tower Records. It was the band's first album without any involvement from former band leader Syd Barrett, and is a soundtrack for the 1969 film of the same name, which was primarily filmed on location on Ibiza and was the directorial debut of Barbet Schroeder.

Unlike its predecessors The Piper at the Gates of Dawn (1967) and A Saucerful of Secrets (1968), More received mixed reviews from critics.

MusicBrainz

MusicBrainz is a project that aims to create an open data music database that is similar to the freedb project. MusicBrainz was founded in response to the restrictions placed on the Compact Disc Database (CDDB), a database for software applications to look up audio CD (compact disc) information on the Internet. MusicBrainz has expanded its goals to reach beyond a compact disc metadata (this is information about the performers, artists, songwriters, etc.) storehouse to become a structured open online database for music.MusicBrainz captures information about artists, their recorded works, and the relationships between them. Recorded works entries capture at a minimum the album title, track titles, and the length of each track. These entries are maintained by volunteer editors who follow community written style guidelines. Recorded works can also store information about the release date and country, the CD ID, cover art, acoustic fingerprint, free-form annotation text and other metadata. As of 21 September 2018, MusicBrainz contained information about roughly 1.4 million artists, 2 million releases, and 19 million recordings. End-users can use software that communicates with MusicBrainz to add metadata tags to their digital media files, such as FLAC, MP3, Ogg Vorbis or AAC.

Obscured by Clouds

Obscured by Clouds is the seventh studio album by the English progressive rock band Pink Floyd, based on their soundtrack for the French film La Vallée, by Barbet Schroeder. It was released in the United Kingdom on 2 June 1972, and a few weeks later in the United States, by Harvest Records, reaching number 6 and number 46 respectively. A single, "Free Four", was issued in the US only.

The album was something of a stopgap for the band, who had already started work on The Dark Side of the Moon, and was recorded in two sessions in France between touring, with three days for mixing. The original plan was to just record small sections of music, but they ultimately created enough songs for a complete album. The resulting work has been overlooked in the Pink Floyd canon because of the huge commercial success of later albums, but still has a positive reaction from fans and critics.

Point Me at the Sky

"Point Me at the Sky" is the fifth United Kingdom single by the British band Pink Floyd, released on 17 December 1968. The song was an early collaboration by bassist Roger Waters and guitarist David Gilmour. The single was not released in the United States, but was in Canada, Japan, and some European countries.

The vocals on the verse of the song are sung by Gilmour, and the bridge vocals are shared between Gilmour and Waters.

Promotional U.K. copies and some foreign releases mistakenly printed the title "Point Me to the Sky" on the label and or sleeve.

The Ruins of Undermountain

The Ruins of Undermountain is a boxed set for the Forgotten Realms campaign setting for the second edition of the Advanced Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. The set, with product code TSR 1060, was published in 1991, and was written by Ed Greenwood, with box cover art by Brom.

Ummagumma

Ummagumma is the fourth album by the English rock band Pink Floyd. It is a double album and was released on 7 November 1969 by Harvest Records. The first disc consists of live recordings from concerts at Mothers Club in Birmingham and the College of Commerce in Manchester that contained part of their normal set list of the time, while the second contains solo compositions by each member of the band recorded at Abbey Road Studios. The artwork was designed by regular Floyd collaborators Hipgnosis and features a number of pictures of the band combined to give a Droste effect.

Although the album was well received at the time of release, and was a top five hit in the UK album charts, it has since been looked upon unfavourably by the band, who have expressed negative opinions about it in interviews. Nevertheless, the album has been reissued on CD several times, along with the rest of their catalogue.

With the Beatles

With the Beatles is the second studio album by the English rock band the Beatles. It was released on 22 November 1963, on Parlophone, and was recorded four months after the band's debut Please Please Me. The album features eight original compositions (seven by Lennon–McCartney and "Don't Bother Me", George Harrison's first recorded solo composition and his first released on a Beatles album) and six covers (mostly of Motown, rock and roll, and R&B hits). The cover photograph was taken by the fashion photographer Robert Freeman, and it has been mimicked by several music groups over the years.

The album became the first Beatles album released in North America when it was released in Canada on 25 November under the augmented title Beatlemania! With the Beatles, with additional text on the album cover, and issued only in mono at the time, catalogue number T 6051 (a stereo Canadian release would come in 1968, catalogue number ST 6051). With the Beatles was unevenly "split" over the group's first two Capitol albums in the United States; nine tracks were issued on Meet the Beatles! (the eight original compositions plus "Till There Was You"), and the remaining five, all "covers", were placed on The Beatles' Second Album.

The LP had advance orders of a half million and sold another half million by September 1965, making it the second album to sell a million copies in the United Kingdom, after the soundtrack to the 1958 film South Pacific. With the Beatles remained at the top of the charts for 21 weeks, displacing Please Please Me, so that the Beatles occupied the top spot for 51 consecutive weeks. It even reached number 11 in the "singles charts" (because at the time UK charts counted all records sold, regardless of format). EMI Australia did not receive the cover art, and used different shots of the band in a similar style to the black-and-white photograph on other releases. The Beatles were unaware of this until fans showed them the cover during their only Australian tour, and informed the EMI publicity staff that they were not pleased with the substitution.On 26 February 1987, With the Beatles was officially released on compact disc (in mono only, catalogue number CDP 7 46436 2). Having been available only as an import in the US in the past, the album was also issued domestically in the US on LP and cassette on 21 July 1987. Along with the rest of the Beatles' canon, it was re-released on CD in newly re-mastered stereo and mono versions on 9 September 2009.

The album was ranked number 420 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time in 2003, and was included in Robert Dimery's 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.

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