Cotton Davidson

Francis Marion "Cotton" Davidson (born November 30, 1931) is a former American football quarterback and punter.

Cotton Davidson
refer to caption
Davidson (#19) as quarterback for Baylor against Houston in 1952
No. 19, 18
Position:Quarterback / Punter
Personal information
Born:November 30, 1931 (age 87)
Gatesville, Texas
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:182 lb (83 kg)
Career information
College:Baylor
NFL Draft:1954 / Round: 1 / Pick: 5
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career professional statistics
TDInt:73–108
Passing yards:11,760
Passer rating:54.9
Punts:280
Punting yards:10,679
Average punt:38.1
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

College career

Davidson attended Baylor University, and played professionally for the National Football League's Baltimore Colts (1954, 1957), and the American Football League's Dallas Texans (1960–1962) and Oakland Raiders (1962–1968). Davidson also played quarterback for the Fort Bliss Falcons in 1955 to 1957. A game between the Fort Bliss Falcons and the Fort Sill, Oklahoma Cannoneers was played for a trophy called "The Little Brown Dud." The Cannoneers won the game and took home the Little Brown Dud. Cotton was awarded All-Army Quarterback in 1955.

Professional career

Davidson was selected in the first round of the 1954 NFL Draft by the Baltimore Colts. In addition to playing quarterback, he also was a placekicker and punter. An original Dallas Texan, Davidson was the first starting quarterback for the franchise.

On July 2, 1962, the Texans signed Len Dawson, thus ending his career as the Dallas quarterback. After the 1962 season opener, he was traded to the Oakland Raiders for the first overall selection in the 1963 American Football League Draft, which was used by the Chiefs to select future Hall of Famer Buck Buchanan. Just two weeks later, Davidson started at quarterback in his first game with the Raiders. Playing against his former team, he threw for 248 yards and rushed for a touchdown in a 26-16 loss to the Texans.

The high moments of his career were being selected to the American Football League All-Star Game twice: in 1961 and in 1963. He was honored as the MVP of the 1961 AFL All-Star Game while with the Texans.

Davidson finished with an all-time record of 19-33-1 as a starter.

See also

1953 Baylor Bears football team

The 1953 Baylor Bears football team represented Baylor University in the 1953 college football season. They finished with a 7-3 record in the Southwest Conference for the year. Tackle James Ray Smith was selected as an All American player; Cotton Davidson (Quarterback), Jerry Coody (Halfback) and Smith were all selected All-Southwest Conference players.

1960 American Football League season

The 1960 American Football League season was the inaugural regular season of the American Football League (AFL). It consisted of 8 franchises split into two divisions: the East Division (Buffalo Bills, Houston Oilers, Titans of New York, Boston Patriots) and the West Division (Los Angeles Chargers, Denver Broncos, Dallas Texans, Oakland Raiders).

The season ended when the Houston Oilers defeated the Los Angeles Chargers 24–16 in the inaugural AFL Championship game.

1960 Dallas Texans season

The 1960 Dallas Texans season was the inaugural season of Lamar Hunt's American Football League franchise from Dallas, Texas. Head coach Hank Stram led the team to an 8–6 record and second place in the AFL's Western Conference.For the Texans' inaugural season, team owner Lamar Hunt pursued both legendary University of Oklahoma coach Bud Wilkinson and New York Giants defensive assistant Tom Landry to lead his Texans franchise. Wilkinson opted to stay at Oklahoma, while Landry was destined to coach the NFL's expansion franchise in Dallas. Hunt settled on a relatively unknown assistant coach from the University of Miami, Hank Stram. "One of the biggest reasons I hired Hank was that he really wanted the job", Hunt explained. "It turned out to be a very lucky selection on my part."The Texans set up offices in the Mercantile National Bank Building, while Jerry Foss headquartered the AFL offices out of Dallas, as well. Reserved seats were USD $4, general admission USD $2 and high school students paid USD $.90 that initial season. Don Rossi served as the team's General Manager until November when he was succeeded by Jack Steadman.

The Texans conducted their inaugural training camp at the New Mexico Military Institute in Roswell, New Mexico. The club embarked on a whirlwind pre-season barnstorming tour that featured road games in Oakland, Tulsa, Boston, Abilene, and Little Rock. An announced crowd of 51,000 at the Cotton Bowl witnessed a 24–3 victory against Houston on September 2 as the club concluded a perfect 6–0 preseason record.The Texans had a strong home-state identity with quarterback Cotton Davidson from Baylor, linebacker Sherrill Headrick from TCU and running back Abner Haynes from North Texas. Haynes led the league with 875 rushing yards and nine TDs, as well as combined net yards (2,100) and punt return average (15.4).The Texans also had a flashy, high-scoring club which finished the year at 8–6 as three close losses kept the squad from challenging for the division title. The Texans averaged 24,500 for their home games, the highest average in the league.

1961 Dallas Texans season

The 1961 Dallas texans season was the 2nd season for the Dallas Texans as a professional AFL franchise; They finished the season with a 6–8 record and second-place finish in the AFL Western Conference.

The club moved its training camp to Lamar Hunt's alma mater of Southern Methodist University and started the regular season at 3–1 before hitting a six-game losing skid, the longest such streak of head coach Hank Stram's tenure with the franchise. One of those losses was a 28–21 decision in a Friday night contest at Boston (11/3) which featured a bizarre ending as a raincoat-clad fan knocked down a potential game-tying TD from Cotton Davidson to Chris Burford on the game's final play. The team rebounded to claim wins in three of its final four contests to finish 6–8, marking the club's second straight finish behind the Chargers in the AFL West standings.

Bill Troup

Paul William "Bill" Troup III (April 2, 1951 – December 14, 2013) was a professional American football player. He was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. An undrafted quarterback from the University of South Carolina, Troup played in seven NFL seasons from 1974 to 1980 for 2 different teams. After being released by Baltimore, Troup went north to the C.F.L.'s Winnipeg Blue Bombers, where he served as Dieter Brock's backup for the 1979 season. He saw his most extensive action for the Colts in 1978, when Bert Jones was injured and Mike Kirkland ineffective.

Bob Dee

Robert Henry Dee (May 18, 1933 – April 18, 1979) was an American football defensive end in the National Football League and the American Football League. He was a three-sport letterman at the College of the Holy Cross who was one of the first players signed by the Boston Patriots of the American Football League in 1960.

After two years with the Washington Redskins in 1957–58, Dee returned to Holy Cross to tutor the team's linemen.

He became an ironman of the American Football League who never missed a game during his career, starting 112 consecutive games. Despite equipment improvements over the years, Dee was a superstitious player who chose to wear the same helmet throughout his career (105 of 112 games). Dee etched his name in the history books by scoring the first points in American Football League history, scoring a touchdown when he dove onto a fumble by Bills QB Tommy O'Connell (father of former Boston Bruins GM Mike O'Connell) the end zone in the second quarter of the league's first-ever exhibition game, a contest between the Patriots and the Bills on July 30, 1960. He was voted to four American Football League All-Star teams (1961, 1963–65) and is a member of the Patriots All-1960s (AFL) Team.

Dee recorded 33 QB sacks (not including his strip sack of Tommy O'Connell in the AFL's first Exhibition Game).

Dee sacked Frank Tripucka, Al Dorow, Hunter Enis, Jacky Lee, MC Reynolds, Randy Duncan, Cotton Davidson, George Blanda, Jack Kemp, Johnny Green, John Hadl, Tobin Rote, Len Dawson, Eddie Wilson, Dick Wood, Joe Namath, Tom Flores, Rick Norton and Bob Griese and recovered fumbles by Al Carmichael, Art Baker, Wayne Crow, Jacky Lee, Paul Lowe, Bill Tobin, Wray Carlton & Max Chobian.

He had two interceptions in the Patriots 26-8 Eastern Divisional Playoff Game win over the Buffalo Bills. In that game, he wore one sneaker and one football shoe with spikes, which made him maneuver better in the snow in the game played at War Memorial Stadium on December 28, 1963.

On July 22, 1968, Dee announced his retirement from professional football, citing a business opportunity that was "too good to resist."

Dee died of a heart attack in 1979 while on a business trip.

He was awarded a game ball for his outstanding performance in the Patriots 34-17 win over the Houston Oilers on November 29, 1964.

He was inducted in the Patriots Hall of Fame on August 18, 1993.

In recognition of his accomplishments on the field, the Patriots retired his number (89).

Cotton (nickname)

Cotton is the nickname of:

Cotton Davidson (born 1931), American National Football League (NFL) quarterback for the Baltimore Colts

Cotton Fitzsimmons (1931–2004), American college and NBA basketball coach

Cotton Ivy (born 1930), American humorist, comedian and entertainer who served in the Tennessee House of Representatives

Cotton Knaupp (1889–1967), American Major League Baseball (MLB) shortstop

Cotton Minahan (1882–1958), American MLB pitcher, and track and field athlete who competed at the 1900 Summer Olympics in Paris

Cotton Nash (born 1942), American MLB outfielder and National Basketball Association (NBA) forward

Cotton Owens (1924–2012), American NASCAR driver

Cotton Pippen (1911–1981), American MLB pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals (1936), Philadelphia Athletics (1939), and Detroit Tigers (1939–40)

Cotton Priddy (1928–1956), American NASCAR Grand National race car driver from Louisville, Kentucky

Cotton Speyrer (born 1949), American NFL wide receiver for the Baltimore Colts and the Miami Dolphins

Cotton Tierney (1894–1953), American MLB second baseman and third baseman for the Pittsburgh Pirates, Philadelphia Phillies, Boston Braves, and Brooklyn Robins

Cotton Warburton (1911–1982), American film and television editor with sixty feature film credits with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios (MGM)

Craig Erickson

Craig Neil Erickson (born May 17, 1969) is a former professional quarterback who was selected by the Philadelphia Eagles in the fifth round of the 1991 NFL Draft and also by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the fourth round of the 1992 NFL Draft. He is one of the few NFL players to be drafted twice, another famous example being Bo Jackson. Coincidentally, each was drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.

Eddie Wilson (American football)

Edward Adair Wilson (born August 14, 1940 in Redding, California) is a former American football quarterback and punter in the American Football League. He played collegiately at Arizona and professionally for the Dallas Texans, the Kansas City Chiefs, and the Boston Patriots. He coached for Arizona, Army, Cornell, Duke, Florida State, Georgia Tech, Wake Forest, and the Kansas City Chiefs.

Hunter Enis

George Hunter Enis (born December 10, 1936 in Fort Worth, Texas) is a former American collegiate and Professional Football quarterback who played for three seasons in the American Football League. He played for the Dallas Texans in 1960, the San Diego Chargers in 1961, and the Oakland Raiders and the Denver Broncos in 1962. He played college football at Texas Christian University, and currently serves on their Board of Trustees.

Jeff George

Jeffrey Scott George (born December 8, 1967) is a former American college and professional football player in the National Football League (NFL) for thirteen seasons during the 1990s and early 2000s. He played college football for the University of Illinois after transferring from Purdue. George was drafted by the Indianapolis Colts with the first overall pick of the 1990 NFL Draft, and also played for the Atlanta Falcons, Oakland Raiders, Minnesota Vikings, Washington Redskins, and Seattle Seahawks of the NFL.

Jim Lee Hunt

Jim Lee "Earthquake" Hunt (October 5, 1938 – November 22, 1975) was an American college and professional football player from Prairie View A&M University who played defensive tackle for the American Football League's Boston Patriots from 1960 through 1969, and for the NFL' Boston Patriots in 1970. He was a four-time AFL All-Star, and was one of only twenty men to play the entire ten years of the AFL. He was used as a defensive end occasionally.

List of Indianapolis Colts starting quarterbacks

The Indianapolis Colts are a professional American football team based in Indianapolis, Indiana. They are currently members of the South Division of the American Football Conference (AFC) in the National Football League (NFL).

The club was officially founded in Baltimore, Maryland in 1953, as the Baltimore Colts, replacing a previous team of that name that folded in 1950. After 31 seasons in Baltimore, Colts owner Robert Irsay moved the team to Indianapolis.

The Colts have had 33 starting quarterbacks (QB) in the history of their franchise. The Colts' past starting quarterbacks include Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee Johnny Unitas, as well as the Associated Press National Football League Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) winners Earl Morrall and Bert Jones. Unitas also won the MVP award three times in his career. The franchise's first starting quarterback was Fred Enke, who started 9 games in total for the Colts. The Colts' starting quarterback from 1998 to 2011 was 5-time MVP Peyton Manning. The Colts' current starting quarterback is Andrew Luck.

List of Kansas City Chiefs first-round draft picks

The Kansas City Chiefs are a professional American football team based in Kansas City, Missouri. Center E. J. Holub was the initial first round selection by made by the franchise. From 1960 to 1962, the Chiefs were known as the Dallas Texans until their relocation to Kansas City, Missouri. The team participated in the American Football League's annual player draft from 1960 to 1966 until the beginning of the common draft in 1967 and the AFL's subsequent merger with the National Football League in 1970. Since 1970, the team has participated in the National Football League's annual player draft.

The Chiefs have only had the first overall selection in the draft twice in franchise history, once in 2013 (Eric Fisher), the other in 1963 (Hall of Famer Buck Buchanan) when the team traded quarterback Cotton Davidson to the Oakland Raiders for the selection. The franchise has selected two players in the first round in the same year on five different occasions, coming in 1963, 1968, 1979, 1984, and 2008. The team has also traded away their first pick eight times, in 1973, 1975, 1993, 2001, 2004, 2016, 2018, 2019.

Only two of the Chiefs first round picks are still on their roster, quarterback Patrick Mahomes and tackle Eric Fisher.

List of Kansas City Chiefs starting quarterbacks

The Kansas City Chiefs are a professional American football team based in Kansas City, Missouri. The Chiefs are a member of the Western Division of the American Football Conference in the National Football League (NFL). Originally named the Dallas Texans, the club was founded by Lamar Hunt in 1960 as a charter member of the American Football League. In 1963, the team moved to Kansas City, Missouri and were renamed the Kansas City Chiefs.

The Chiefs have had 37 different quarterbacks start at least one game in their franchise's history, 21 of which have started at least 10 games. Cotton Davidson was the team's first starting quarterback; he played all 14 games for the Texans in their inaugural 1960 season. Davidson played with the franchise from 1960 to 1962, and was traded in 1963 to the Oakland Raiders. Len Dawson signed with on July 2, 1962 and played for the franchise for 14 seasons. With Dawson as the team's starter, the Texans/Chiefs won three American Football League championships and appeared in two Super Bowl championship games. Dawson was named Most Valuable Player after the Chiefs' victory in Super Bowl IV and retired in 1975 with several franchise records. Three quarterbacks currently in the Pro Football Hall of Fame have started at least one game for Kansas City: Dawson, Joe Montana, and Warren Moon. In the 2008 season, the Chiefs started three quarterbacks: Brodie Croyle, Damon Huard, and Tyler Thigpen. After Croyle and Huard were sidelined by injuries, Thigpen played in eleven games, winning one and losing ten. In 2009 and 2010, Matt Cassel started 15 of 16 games each season, while Croyle started the other 2 games.

List of Oakland Raiders starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the team.

Matt Stevens (quarterback)

Matthew Anthony Stevens (born July 30, 1964) is a former professional American football quarterback who played one season in the National Football League. He played for the Kansas City Chiefs following the 1987 NFL strike. He played in three games for the Chiefs, starting two of them. He played high school football at Fountain Valley High School and collegiate football at UCLA.

Mike Rae

Michael John Rae (born July 26, 1951) is a former professional American football quarterback in the National Football League.

Tom Matte

Thomas Roland Matte (born June 14, 1939), is a former American football player who played quarterback in college and primarily running back in the National Football League (NFL) in the 1960s and 1970s and earned a Super Bowl Ring. He attended Shaw High School in East Cleveland and is an Eagle Scout. Matte was an All-American back at Ohio State University.

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