Cot Deal

Ellis Ferguson "Cot" Deal (January 23, 1923 – May 21, 2013) was a pitcher and coach in Major League Baseball. Listed at 5 ft 10.5 in (1.79 m), 185 lb (84 kg), Deal was a switch-hitter and threw right-handed. A native of Arapaho, Oklahoma, he grew up in Oklahoma City and was nicknamed "Cot" for his cotton-top hair color.

Deal had a career in baseball from 1940 through 1989 and interrupted only by military service during World War II (1943–44).[1] He spent 48 years in baseball as a player (20), manager (5), coach (22) and executive (1).

Deal died May 21, 2013 in Oklahoma City.[2]

Cot Deal
Pitcher
Born: January 23, 1923
Arapaho, Oklahoma
Died: May 21, 2013 (aged 90)
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Batted: Switch Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 11, 1947, for the Boston Red Sox
Last MLB appearance
September 9, 1954, for the St. Louis Cardinals
MLB statistics
Win–loss record3–4
Earned run average6.55
Strikeouts34
Teams

Playing career

As a sixteen-year-old, Deal was invited by the Pittsburgh Pirates to spend in week in Pittsburgh. By then, the club was managed by Pie Traynor, who gave Deal his first baseball tryout. After signing with Pittsburgh two years before his high school graduation, he spent 1940 with the Hutchinson, Kansas team of the Western Association, hitting a .312 average while splitting time between the outfield and third base. The next year he gained promotion to the Harrisburg Pirates of the Interstate League, playing for them two seasons before joining the military. As a physical training instructor for the U.S. Army Air Corps, Deal remained stateside until his discharge in 1945. That year, he played in the International League with the Toronto Maple Leafs, where he became a pitcher, and was sold to the Boston Red Sox in 1947. Late in the season he was called up to the Red Sox, making his debut on September 11 as a pinch-hitter. In his first major league at bat, he connected a game-winning RBI single off Cleveland Indians pitcher Bob Lemon, while posting a 0–1 mark in five appearances.

Deal earned a spot as a starting pitcher during 1948 spring training, but hurt his arm after that. It was an injury which would plague him for the rest of his career. Despite the pain, he would eventually pitch in four games with the Red Sox that year and went 1–0 with a perfect 0.00 ERA in 4 innings of relief. In 1949 he was traded by Boston to the St. Louis Cardinals in exchange for a minor leaguer. He spent 1949 with the Columbus Red Birds of the American Association and later pitched in 36 games for the Cardinals in 1950 and 1954.

In four major league seasons Deal posted a 3–4 record with a 6.55 ERA in 45 games, including two starts, 34 strikeouts, 48 walks, 12 games finished, one save, and 89​13 innings of work. As a hitter, he collected a .167 batting average (4-for-24), including one home run, one double, five runs, and four RBI.

Deal later established himself in the St. Louis organization as an outfielder, catcher and switch-hitting pinch-hitter, while winning 108 games as a pitcher. His highlights included starting and completing a twenty-inning game for Columbus against the Louisville Colonels on September 3, 1949. In addition to winning the game and giving up one earned run during the 20 innings, he collected four hits in eight at bats. He also hit a home run during the 1952 Caribbean Series while playing as a pitcher/outfielder for the Puerto Rico team. Between 1951 and 1959 Deal spent most of those years with the Cardinals' AAA International League farm team, the Rochester Red Wings. He had a record of 61–38 as a pitcher for Rochester. Deal also was a utility outfielder, back-up catcher and pinch-hitter for the Red Wings.

Coaching career

When Rochester manager Dixie Walker resigned after the 1956 season Deal was the first choice to manage the 1957 Red Wings. Deal would manage the Red Wings until he resigned in August 1959. He was inducted into the Red Wings' Hall of Fame in 1994.

Following his playing career Deal served as a pitching coach for the Cincinnati Reds (1959–60), Houston Colt .45s (1962–64), New York Yankees (1965), Kansas City Athletics (1966–67), Cleveland Indians (1970–71) and Detroit Tigers (1973–74). He also worked as outfield coach and defensive coordinator with the Houston Astros (1983–85), as assistant minor league director for the Chicago White Sox (1986), and with the San Francisco Giants organization as minor league hitting and outfield coach (1987–89).

As a minor league manager Deal led the Indianapolis Indians to the 1961 American Association championship. He also managed the Oklahoma 89ers (PCL, 1968; AA, 1969); coached and managed the Toledo Mud Hens (IL, 1972 and 1973); coached the Columbus Clippers (IL, 1978), and returned with the PCL Oklahoma team as coach and interim manager (1979–82).

References

  1. ^ "Baseball in Wartime - Those Who Served A to Z". BaseballInWartime.com. Retrieved August 15, 2016.
  2. ^ "Oklahoma scene: Edmonton Oilers, Dallas Stars to play exhibition at Cox Center". NewsOK.com. May 23, 2013. Retrieved August 15, 2016.

External links

Preceded by
Clyde King
Cincinnati Reds pitching coach
1959–1960
Succeeded by
Jim Turner
Preceded by
Franchise created
Houston Colt .45s pitching coach
1962–1964
Succeeded by
Howie Pollet
Preceded by
Whitey Ford
New York Yankees pitching coach
1965
Succeeded by
Jim Turner
Preceded by
Tom Ferrick
Kansas City Athletics pitching coach
1966–1967
Succeeded by
Wes Stock
Preceded by
Jack Sanford
Cleveland Indians pitching coach
1970–1971
Succeeded by
Warren Spahn
Preceded by
Art Fowler
Detroit Tigers pitching coach
1973–1974
Succeeded by
Steve Hamilton
1947 Boston Red Sox season

The 1947 Boston Red Sox season was the 47th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished third in the American League (AL) with a record of 83 wins and 71 losses.

1948 Boston Red Sox season

The 1948 Boston Red Sox season was the 48th season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League (AL) with a record of 96 wins and 59 losses, including the loss of a one-game playoff to the Cleveland Indians after both teams had finished the regular schedule with identical 96–58 records. The first Red Sox season to be broadcast on television, broadcasts were then alternated between WBZ-TV and WNAC-TV but with the same broadcast team regardless of broadcasting station.

1950 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1950 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 69th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 59th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 78–75 during the season and finished 5th in the National League.

1952 Caribbean Series

The fourth edition of the Caribbean Series (Serie del Caribe) was played in 1952. It was held from February 20 through February 26, featuring the champion baseball teams of Cuba, Leones de la Habana; Panama, Carta Vieja Yankees; Puerto Rico, Senadores de San Juan and Venezuela, Cervecería Caracas. The format consisted of 12 games, each team facing the other teams twice, and the games were played at Panama City. The first pitch was thrown by Alcibíades Arosemena, by then the President of Panama.

1953 Caribbean Series

The fifth edition of the Caribbean Series (Serie del Caribe) was played in 1953. It was held from February 20 through February 25, featuring the champion baseball teams of Cuba, Leones de la Habana; Panama, Chesterfield Smokers; Puerto Rico, Cangrejeros de Santurce, and Venezuela, Leones del Caracas. The format consisted of 12 games, each team facing the other teams twice. The games were played at Estadio del Cerro in Havana, the Cuban capital.

1954 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1954 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 73rd season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 63rd season in the National League. The Cardinals went 72–82 during the season and finished 6th in the National League.

1957 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1957 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 76th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 66th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 87–67 during the season and finished second in the National League, eight games behind the Milwaukee Braves.

1958 St. Louis Cardinals season

The 1958 St. Louis Cardinals season was the team's 77th season in St. Louis, Missouri and its 67th season in the National League. The Cardinals went 72–82 during the season and finished 5th in the National League.

1959 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1959 Cincinnati Reds season consisted of the Reds finishing in a fifth-place tie with the Chicago Cubs in the National League standings, with a record of 74–80, 13 games behind the NL and World Champion Los Angeles Dodgers.

Prior to the season the club, after calling themselves the Cincinnati Redlegs for the past six seasons, changed its nickname back to the Reds. The Reds played their home games at Crosley Field.

1960 Cincinnati Reds season

The 1960 Cincinnati Reds season consisted of the Reds finishing in sixth place in the National League standings, with a record of 67–87, 28 games behind the National League and World Series champion Pittsburgh Pirates.

The Reds were managed by Fred Hutchinson and played their home games at Crosley Field.

1970 Cleveland Indians season

The 1970 Cleveland Indians season was the 70th season for the franchise. The club finished in fifth place in the American League East with a record of 76 wins and 86 losses.

1983 Houston Astros season

The Houston Astros' 1983 season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Houston Astros attempting to win the National League West.

Charlie White (baseball)

Charles White (August 12, 1927 – May 26, 1998) was an American professional baseball player who had a 15-year career in the game, including full seasons in the Negro Leagues and in Major League Baseball. The catcher was a native of Kinston, North Carolina; he was 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall, weighed 192 pounds (87 kg), batted left-handed and threw right-handed.

White broke into pro ball with the Philadelphia Stars of the Negro American League in 1950. After that season, he was acquired by the St. Louis Browns, whose owner, Bill Veeck, was active in integrating his organization's playing ranks. White spent three seasons in the upper levels of minor league baseball in the Browns' farm system before being traded to the Milwaukee Braves prior to the 1954 season.

White then spent the entire 1954 season and the first two months of 1955 on the Braves' National League roster. Playing behind one of the league's workhorse catchers, Del Crandall, White appeared in 50 games in 1954, 16 as starting catcher (while Crandall started 133 of the Braves' 154 games). In his third Major League game, on April 23 against the St. Louis Cardinals at Busch Stadium, White hit his only big-league home run, a solo blow in the top of the 13th inning off Cot Deal. The homer temporarily put the Braves ahead, 5–4, and they would triumph, 7–5, in 14 innings with White handling the catching chores. He also had a three-hit game (in five at bats) against the Cardinals at Busch Stadium on July 5. But he batted only .237 for the season. At the outset of the 1955 campaign, White again backed up Crandall, and in the season's first two months he started nine games at catcher and batted .233. After his final MLB game on May 29, White played 10​1⁄2 more seasons at the Triple-A level, ten of them in the Pacific Coast League.

In his 62-game big-league career, White had 29 hits, including five doubles as well as his home run.

Clyde King

Clyde Edward King (May 23, 1924 – November 2, 2010) was an American pitcher, coach, manager, general manager and front office executive in Major League Baseball. King, whose career in baseball spanned over 60 years, was perhaps best known for his longtime role as a special baseball advisor to George Steinbrenner, late owner of the New York Yankees. During his on-field career he managed the San Francisco Giants (1969–70), Atlanta Braves (1974–75) and Yankees (part of 1982), finishing with a career record of 234 wins and 229 defeats (.505).

Deal (surname)

Deal is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Borden Deal (1922–1985), American novelist and short story writer

Charlie Deal (1891–1979), Major League Baseball player

Cot Deal (1923–2013), Major League Baseball pitcher and coach

Kelley Deal (born 1961), American musician

Kim Deal (born 1961), American singer, guitarist and bassist; identical twin sister of Kelley Deal

Lance Deal (born 1961), American hammer thrower and 1996 Olympic silver medalist

Nathan Deal (born 1942), American politician and Governor of Georgia

Robert Deal (d. 1721), English pirate

Ame Deal (2000-2010), American murder victim. Died of suffocation in Phoenix, Arizona

Frank Verdi

Frank Michael Verdi (June 2, 1926 – July 9, 2010) was an American professional baseball infielder and longtime manager. He spent his career in minor league baseball, except for a single playing appearance in the Major Leagues for the 1953 New York Yankees. As a player, he was listed at 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) and 170 pounds (77 kg); he both batted and threw right-handed. He was selected to the Syracuse Baseball Wall of Fame in 1999 and the International League Hall of Fame in 2008.

Howie Pollet

Howard Joseph Pollet (June 26, 1921 – August 8, 1974) was an American left-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball during the 1940s and 1950s. A three-time All-Star in 1943, 1946 and 1949, he twice led the National League in earned run average (1.75 in 1943 and 2.10 in 1946).

Jim Turner (baseball)

James Riley Turner (August 6, 1903 – November 29, 1998) was a pitcher and coach in Major League Baseball. As a member of the Cincinnati Reds and New York Yankees, he was a member of nine World Series Championship teams between 1940 and 1959, two as a player and seven as a coach. Most notably, he was pitching coach for the Yankees under Casey Stengel from 1949 to 1959, during which time they won seven titles. Apart from his baseball career, Turner was a lifelong resident of Nashville, Tennessee.

Toledo Mud Hens managers

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