Cory Panshin

Cory Panshin (born 1947) is an American science fiction critic and writer. She often writes in collaboration with her husband, Alexei Panshin.[1] The Panshins won the Hugo award for Best Non-Fiction Book in 1990 for The World Beyond the Hill,[2] a massive history of science fiction. Panshin is currently writing a "theory of human history as controlled by an evolving sequence of visions of the underlying nature of reality"[3] which she is publishing in installments on her personal blog.

References

  1. ^ Nicholls 1979, p. 447.
  2. ^ Reginald 1992, p. 744.
  3. ^ Panshin, Cory. "The Dance of the Visions 2.0". Retrieved August 16, 2012.
Citations

External links

48th World Science Fiction Convention

The 48th World Science Fiction Convention (Worldcon), was ConFiction, which was held in The Hague, Netherlands 23rd-27 August 1990 at the Netherlands Congress Centre. This convention was one of the two Worldcons held in continental Europe, the other being the 28th World Science Fiction Convention held in West Germany.

Alexei Panshin

Alexei Panshin (born August 14, 1940) is an American writer and science fiction (SF) critic. He has written several critical works and several novels, including the 1968 Nebula Award-winning novel Rite of Passage and the 1990 Hugo Award-winning study of science fiction The World Beyond the Hill (written with his wife, Cory Panshin).

Hyperpilosity

"Hyperpilosity" is a classic science fiction story by L. Sprague de Camp. It was first published in the magazine Astounding Stories for April, 1938, and first appeared in book form in the de Camp collection The Wheels of If and Other Science Fiction (Shasta, 1949; It later appeared in the anthologies Omnibus of Science Fiction (Crown, 1952), Science Fiction of the Thirties (Bobbs-Merrill, 1975), The Edward De Bono Science Fiction Collection, (Elmfield Press, 1976) and The Road to Science Fiction #2: From Wells to Heinlein (Mentor, 1979), as well as the magazine Fantastic Story Magazine (September, 1953) and the de Camp collection The Best of L. Sprague de Camp (Doubleday, 1978). In 2014 the story was shortlisted for the Retro Hugo Award for Best Short Story.

Lest Darkness Fall and Related Stories

Lest Darkness Fall and Related Stories is an anthology of time travel alternate history stories by American writers L. Sprague de Camp, Frederik Pohl, S. M. Stirling and David Drake. It was first published in trade paperback by Phoenix Pick in March 2011.The book collects de Camp's classic novel Lest Darkness Fall, an afterword concerning its significance by Alexei and Cory Panshin, and tales responding to it by the other authors.

Living Fossil (short story)

"Living Fossil" is a science fiction story on the concepts of human extinction and future evolution by L. Sprague de Camp. It was first published in the magazine Astounding Science-Fiction for February 1939. It first appeared in book form in the anthology A Treasury of Science Fiction (Crown Publishers, 1948); it later appeared in the anthologies Gates to Tomorrow (Atheneum, 1973), and The SFWA Grand Masters, Volume 1 (Tor Books, 1999). The story has been translated into Danish, Swedish and Italian.It is perhaps the earliest work of fiction dealing with the afterwards popular theme of humanity being replaced by other intelligent primates in the future, later epitomized by Pierre Boulle's Planet of the Apes.

Panshin

Panshin is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:

Aleksandr Panshin (1863–1904), Russian speed skater and figure skater

Alexei Panshin (born 1940), American writer and science fiction critic

Cory Panshin (born 1947), American writer and science fiction critic

Mikhail Panshin (born 1983), Kazakhstani-Russian ice hockey player

Phoenix Pick

Phoenix Pick is the science fiction and fantasy imprint of Arc Manor Publishers based in Rockville, Maryland, United States.

Phoenix Pick publishes many classic and semi-classic works of science fiction and fantasy. These include Dark Universe (1961) and Simulacron-3 (1964) by Daniel F. Galouye, Lest Darkness Fall and Related Stories (1939) by L. Sprague de Camp (with the related stories by Frederik Pohl, David Drake, and S. M. Stirling) and The Long Tomorrow (1955) by Leigh Brackett.

In 2010, Phoenix Pick published two novellas nominated for the Nebula Award: "Act One" by Nancy Kress and '"Arkfall" by Carolyn Gilman. "Act One" was also nominated for the Hugo Award. That year, Phoenix Pick also published Ceres by L. Neil Smith, a finalist for the Prometheus Award.Other publications include Alexei and Cory Panshin's Hugo-Award-winning study on science fiction, The World Beyond the Hill (1989) and the Phoenix Science Fiction Classics series. The series publishes a number of annotated classic texts (with commentary) specifically geared toward college students. PSF Classics is edited by Paul Cook, and authors represented in this series include H. G. Wells and Jules Verne. Additionally, Phoenix Pick promotes Arc Manor's bimonthly Galaxy's Edge magazine.

Science-Fiction Handbook

Science-Fiction Handbook, subtitled The Writing of Imaginative Fiction, is a guide to writing and marketing science fiction and fantasy by L. Sprague de Camp, "one of the earliest books about modern sf." The original edition was published in hardcover by Hermitage House in 1953 as a volume in its Professional Writers Library series. A revised edition, by L. Sprague de Camp and Catherine Crook de Camp, titled Science Fiction Handbook, Revised, was published in hardcover by Owlswick Press in 1975 and as a trade paperback by McGraw-Hill in 1977. An E-book version of the revised edition was published by Gollancz's SF Gateway imprint on April 30, 2014.

Science fiction studies

Science fiction studies is the common name for the academic discipline that studies and researches the history, culture, and works of science fiction and, more broadly, speculative fiction.

Stanley G. Weinbaum

Stanley Grauman Weinbaum (April 4, 1902 – December 14, 1935) was an American science fiction writer. His first story, "A Martian Odyssey", was published to great acclaim in July 1934, but he died from lung cancer less than a year and a half later.

The Best Science Fiction of the Year 2

The Best Science Fiction of the Year #2 is an anthology of science fiction short stories edited by American writer Terry Carr, the second volume in a series of sixteen. It was first published in paperback by Ballantine Books in July 1973, and reissued in May 1976.

The book collects sixteen novellas, novelettes and short stories by various science fiction authors, with an introduction, notes and concluding essay by Carr. The stories were previously published in 1972 in the magazines The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, Amazing Science Fiction, and Analog Science Fiction/Science Fact, and the anthologies New Dimensions II, Infinity Four, Orbit 10, Infinity Three, New Writings in SF 20, Clarion II, Again, Dangerous Visions, Nova 2, and Universe 2.

The Best of Stanley G. Weinbaum

The Best of Stanley G. Weinbaum is a collection of science fiction stories by Stanley G. Weinbaum, published in 1974 as an original paperback by Ballantine Books. The volume included an introduction by Isaac Asimov and an afterword by Robert Bloch. Ballantine reissued the collection twice in the later 1970s; Garland Publishing published a library hardcover edition in 1983, and Sphere Books released a UK market edition in 1977, under the title A Martian Odyssey and Other Stories. The original edition placed third in the 1975 Locus Poll for best genre collection.

The Blue Giraffe

"The Blue Giraffe" is a science fiction story on the concept of mutation by American writer L. Sprague de Camp. It was first published in the magazine Astounding Science-Fiction for August, 1939. It first appeared in book form in the anthology Adventures in Time and Space (Random House, 1946); it later appeared in the anthologies World of Wonder (Twayne, 1951), The Science Fiction Bestiary (Thomas Nelson, 1971), Androids, Time Machines and Blue Giraffes (Follett, 1973), Isaac Asimov Presents the Great Science Fiction Stories: Volume 1, 1939 (DAW Books, 1979), Isaac Asimov Presents The Golden Years of Science Fiction (Bonanza Books, 1983), and An Anthropomorphic Century (FurPlanet Productions, 2015). The story has been translated into Italian, French and German.

The Command (short story)

"The Command" is a science fiction story by American writer L. Sprague de Camp. An early treatment of the concept of uplift, it was the first in his Johnny Black series. It was first published in the magazine Astounding Science-Fiction for October, 1938, and first appeared in book form in the hardcover anthology Modern Masterpieces of Science Fiction (World Publishing Co., 1965; reprinted by Hyperion Press, 1974). It later appeared in the paperback anthology Doorway Into Time (Macfadden-Bartell, 1966) and the subsequent de Camp collection The Best of L. Sprague de Camp (Nelson Doubleday, 1978). The story has also been translated into German.

The Isolinguals

"The Isolinguals" is a science fiction story, addressing the concept of ancestral memory, by American writer L. Sprague de Camp. It was his first published story. It was first published in the magazine Astounding Stories for September, 1937, and first appeared in book form in the anthology First Flight: Maiden Voyages in Space and Time (Lancer Books, Aug. 1963; reprinted Nov. 1966 and Nov. 1969 (as Now Begins Tomorrow). It later appeared in the anthologies First Voyages (Avon Books, May 1981), Tales in Time (White Wolf Publishing, Apr. 1997), and Wondrous Beginnings (DAW Books, Jan. 2003), as well as the de Camp collection Years in the Making: the Time-Travel Stories of L. Sprague de Camp (NESFA Press, 2005).

The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag

The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag is a novella by Robert A. Heinlein. It was originally published in the October 1942 edition of Unknown Worlds magazine under the pseudonym of "John Riverside". It also lends its title to a collection of Heinlein's short stories published in 1959.

The World Beyond the Hill

The World Beyond the Hill: Science Fiction and the Quest for Transcendence (1989) is a book about the history of science fiction, written by Alexei Panshin and Cory Panshin. It took them about ten years to research and write, though they had made earlier attempts at writing a book on the genre.It was first published in hardcover by Jeremy P. Tarcher in August 1989 in a limited signed and numbered edition of 500 copies; a broader hardcover edition for general release and a trade paperback edition followed from the same publisher in the same year. An ebook edition was issued by ElectricStory.com in December 2002, and a new hardcover edition by Phoenix Pick in April 2010.

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