Cornell University Press

The Cornell University Press is a division of Cornell University housed in Sage House, the former residence of Henry William Sage. It was first established in 1869 but inactive from 1884 to 1930, making it the first university publishing enterprise in the United States.[2][3]

The press was established in the College of the Mechanic Arts (as mechanical engineering was called in the 19th century) because engineers knew more about running steam-powered printing presses than literature professors.[4] Since its inception,[2] the press has offered work-study financial aid: students with previous training in the printing trades were paid for typesetting and running the presses that printed textbooks, pamphlets, a weekly student journal, and official university publications.[5]

Today, the press is one of the country's largest university presses.[6] It produces approximately 150 nonfiction titles each year in various disciplines, including anthropology, Asian studies, biological sciences, classics, history, industrial relations, literary criticism and theory, natural history, philosophy, politics and international relations, veterinary science, and women's studies.[3][7] Although the press has been subsidized by the university for most of its history, it is now largely dependent on book sales to finance its operations.[8]

In 2010, the Mellon Foundation, whose President Don Michael Randel is a former Cornell Provost, awarded to the press a $50,000 grant to explore new business models for publishing scholarly works in low-demand humanities subject areas. With this grant, a book series was published titled "Signale: Modern German Letters, Cultures, and Thoughts." Only 500 hard copies of each book in the series will be printed, with extra copies manufactured on demand once the original supply is depleted.[8]

Cornell University Press
Cornell University Press
Parent companyCornell University
Founded1869
Country of originUnited States
Headquarters locationIthaca, New York
DistributionLongleaf Services (US)
Codasat Canada (Canada)
NBN International (Europe)
Footprint Books (Australia)[1]
Publication typesBooks
ImprintsILR Press
Official websitecornellpress.cornell.edu
ASA conference 2008 - 10
2008 conference booth

See also

  • Category:Cornell University Press books

References

  1. ^ "Cornell University Press - Ordering Information". Retrieved 14 March 2018.
  2. ^ a b Bishop, Morris (1962). A History of Cornell. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. p. 127. ISBN 978-0-8014-0036-0.
  3. ^ a b "The History of the Cornell University Press". Cornell University Press. Retrieved 2006-01-01.
  4. ^ Bishop, Morris (1962). A History of Cornell. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. p. 96. ISBN 978-0-8014-0036-0.
  5. ^ Bishop, Morris (1962). A History of Cornell. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press. pp. 175–76. ISBN 978-0-8014-0036-0.
  6. ^ "2009–10 Factbook" (PDF). Cornell University. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2006-06-26. Retrieved 2009-12-27.
  7. ^ "Cornell University Press: Information for Authors". Cornell University Press. Retrieved 2006-06-06.
  8. ^ a b Lam, Jackie (September 21, 2010). "In a Tough Market, University Press Aims to Streamline Production". Cornell Daily Sun. Archived from the original on December 14, 2011. Retrieved 2010-09-22.

External links

Book of the Heavenly Cow

The Book of the Heavenly Cow, or the Book of the Cow of Heaven, is an Ancient Egyptian text thought to have originated during the Amarna Period and, in part, describes the reasons for the imperfect state of the world in terms of humankind's rebellion against the supreme sun god, Ra. Divine punishment was inflicted through the goddess Hathor, with the survivors suffering through separation from Ra, who now resided in the sky on the back of Nut, the heavenly cow.

With this "fall", suffering and death came into the world, along with a fracture in the original unity of creation. The supreme god now changes into many heavenly bodies, creates the "Fields of Paradise" for the blessed dead, perhaps appoints Geb as his heir, hands over the rule of humankind to Osiris (Thoth ruling the night sky as his deputy), with Shu and the Heh gods now supporting the sky goddess Nut.Though the text is recorded in the New Kingdom period, it is written in Middle Egyptian and may have been written during the Middle Kingdom period.

Danilo Kiš

Danilo Kiš (Serbian Cyrillic: Данило Киш; 22 February 1935 – 15 October 1989) was a Serbian novelist, short story writer, essayist and translator. Kiš was influenced by Bruno Schulz, Vladimir Nabokov, Jorge Luis Borges, Ivo Andrić and Miroslav Krleža, among other authors. His best known works include Hourglass, A Tomb for Boris Davidovich and The Encyclopedia of the Dead.

Devil

A devil is the personification of evil as it is conceived in many and various cultures and religious traditions. It is seen as the objectification of a hostile and destructive force.It is difficult to specify a particular definition of any complexity that will cover all of the traditions, beyond that it is a manifestation of evil. It is meaningful to consider the devil through the lens of each of the cultures and religions that have the devil as part of their mythos.The history of this concept intertwines with theology, mythology, psychiatry, art and literature, maintaining a validity, and developing independently within each of the traditions. It occurs historically in many contexts and cultures, and is given many different names — Satan, Lucifer, Beelzebub, Mephistopheles — and attributes: It is portrayed as blue, black, or red; It is portrayed as having horns on its head, and without horns, and so on. The idea of the devil has been taken seriously often, but not always, for example when devil figures are used in advertising and on candy wrappers.

Dominick LaCapra

Dominick LaCapra (born 1939) is an American-born historian of European intellectual history, best known for his work in intellectual history and trauma studies. He served as the Bryce and Edith M. Bowmar Professor of Humanistic Studies at Cornell University, where he is now a professor emeritus.

General Jewish Labour Bund

The General Jewish Labour Bund in Lithuania, Poland and Russia (Yiddish: אַלגעמײַנער ײדישער אַרבעטער בּונד אין ליטע פוילין און רוסלאַנד‎, Algemeyner Yidisher Arbeter Bund in Litah, Poyln un Rusland), generally called The Bund (Yiddish: בונד‎, cognate to German: Bund, meaning federation or union) or the Jewish Labour Bund, was a secular Jewish socialist party in the Russian Empire, active between 1897 and 1920. In 1917 the Polish part of the Bund, which dated to the times when Poland was a Russian territory, seceded from the Russian Bund and created a new Polish General Labor Bund which continued to operate in Poland in the years between the two world wars. The Russian Bund was dissolved in 1920 and incorporated into the Communist Party. Other remnants of the Bund endured in various countries. A member of the Bund was called a Bundist.

John Kekes

John Kekes (; born 22 November 1936) is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the University at Albany, SUNY.

Jonathan Culler

Jonathan Culler (born 1944) is Class of 1916 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Cornell University; his published works are in the fields of structuralism, literary theory and criticism.

Mensheviks

The Mensheviks (Russian: Меньшевики́) were a faction in the Russian socialist movement, the other being the Bolsheviks.

The factions emerged in 1903 following a dispute in the Russian Social Democratic Labour Party (RSDLP) between Julius Martov and Vladimir Lenin. The dispute originated at the 2nd Congress of the RSDLP, ostensibly over minor issues of party organization. Martov's supporters, who were in the minority in a crucial vote on the question of party membership, came to be called Mensheviks, derived from the Russian word меньшинство (minority), while Lenin's adherents were known as Bolsheviks, from большинство (majority).Despite the naming, neither side held a consistent majority over the course of the entire 2nd Congress, and indeed the numerical advantage fluctuated between both sides throughout the rest of the RSDLP's existence until the Russian Revolution. The split proved to be long-standing and had to do both with pragmatic issues based in history, such as the failed Revolution of 1905 and theoretical issues of class leadership, class alliances and interpretations of historical materialism. While both factions believed that a proletarian revolution was necessary, the Mensheviks generally tended to be more moderate, and more positive towards the liberal opposition and the peasant-based Socialist Revolutionary Party.

Pythagoreanism

Pythagoreanism originated in the 6th century BC, based on the teachings and beliefs held by Pythagoras and his followers, the Pythagoreans. Pythagoras established the first Pythagorean community in Croton, Italy. Early-Pythagorean communities lived throughout Magna Graecia. Espousing a rigorous life of the intellect and strict rules on diet, clothing and behavior comprised a cult of following Pythagorean's Code. Peculiar, the Code's diet, prohibits the consumption or even touching any sort of bean or legume. Pythagoras’ death, disputes about his teachings led to the development of two philosophical traditions within Pythagoreanism. The practitioners of akousmatikoi were superseded in the 4th century BC as a significant mendicant school of philosophy by the Cynics. The Pythagorean mathēmatikoi philosophers were in the 4th century BC absorbed into the Platonic school.

Following the political instability in the Magna Graecia, some Pythagorean philosophers fled to mainland Greece while others regrouped in Rhegium. By about 400 BC the majority of Pythagorean philosophers had left Italy. Pythagorean ideas exercised a marked influence on Plato and through him, on all of Western philosophy. Many of the surviving sources on Pythagoras originate with Aristotle and the philosophers of the Peripatetic school.

As a philosophic tradition, Pythagoreanism was revived in the 1st century BC, giving rise to Neopythagoreanism. The worship of Pythagoras continued in Italy and as a religious community Pythagoreans appear to have survived as part of, or deeply influenced, the Bacchic cults and Orphism.

Ronen Palan

Ronen Palan (born 21 March 1957) is an Israeli-born economist and Professor of International Political Economy in the Department of International Politics at the City University London. He has many books and articles on the political economy of the state, globalisation and state strategies, and evolutionary approaches to the study of international relations. Ronen Palan was of the founding editors of the Review of International Political Economy. Palan's major empirical work is the area of offshore financial centres and tax havens. Palan has argued that offshore finance "is certainly not the sole cause for the decline of the nation-state, but it must be seen as an important contributing factor to the decline".In January 2016, Palan acted as an advisor to the BBC's documentary, Britain’s Trillion Pound Paradise – Inside Cayman.. In May 2017, Palan also featured in the documentary, "The Spider's Web: Britain's Second Empire" on the U.K.'s relationships with tax havens.As a student, Palan attended the London School of Economics, and subsequently worked at Newcastle University and the University of Sussex before joining Birmingham University in 2007. Palan has authored and edited a number of books, including Global Political Economy: Contemporary Theories (edited, Routledge, 2000), The Offshore World: Sovereign Markets, Virtual Places, and Nomad Millionaires (Cornell University Press, 2003), The Imagined Economies of Globalisation (with Angus Cameron, Sage, 2004) and Tax Havens: How Globalization Really Works (with Richard Murphy, Christian Chavagneux, Cornell University Press, 2010).Palan is married and has two sons.

Saratov electoral district (Russian Constituent Assembly election, 1917)

The Saratov electoral district (Russian: Саратовский избирательный округ) was a constituency created for the Russian Constituent Assembly election, 1917.

The electoral district covered the Saratov Governorate. Saratov had been one of the early strongholds of the SRs Kerensky was one of the SR candidates, but many voters scratched his name from the list (and thus made their votes invalid). was politically turbulent, also during the election. In Saratov Bolshevik campaigners were frequently attacked by rich farmers. Whilst the SR won in the largely agrarian district, the Bolsheviks had a strong showing with strong support from soldiers and from the industrial city of Tsaritsyn. Khvalynsk uezd was an Old Believer stronghold, with presence of Khlysty and Skoptsky sects. The German socialists didn't field a list in Saratov, whilst the German Central Committee contested on the Volga German List 7.In Tsaritsyn 32,984 votes were cast; 16,613 for the Bolsheviks, 4,468 for the SRs, 2,889 for the Kadets and 2,669 for the Mensheviks.

Simplicius of Cilicia

Simplicius of Cilicia (; Greek: Σιμπλίκιος ὁ Κίλιξ; c. 490 – c. 560) was a disciple of Ammonius Hermiae and Damascius, and was one of the last of the Neoplatonists. He was among the pagan philosophers persecuted by Justinian in the early 6th century, and was forced for a time to seek refuge in the Persian court, before being allowed back into the empire. He wrote extensively on the works of Aristotle. Although his writings are all commentaries on Aristotle and other authors, rather than original compositions, his intelligent and prodigious learning makes him the last great philosopher of pagan antiquity. His works have preserved much information about earlier philosophers which would have otherwise been lost.

Sophrosyne

Sophrosyne (Greek: σωφροσύνη) is an ancient Greek concept of an ideal of excellence of character and soundness of mind, which when combined in one well-balanced individual leads to other qualities, such as temperance, moderation, prudence, purity, decorum and self-control. In other languages there is no equivalent word.

The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World

The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World is a book by Jim Clements which presents a list of the bird species of the world.

The most recent printed version is the sixth edition (2007), which was published by Cornell University Press. Previous editions were published by the author's own imprint, Ibis Publishing. The Cornell Lab of Ornithology has provided annual updates since then, usually in August, and the most recent version is available online in several formats. These updates reflect the ongoing changes to bird taxonomy based on published research.

Clements is the official list used by the American Birding Association for birds globally. eBird also uses the Clements checklist as the base list for its eBird taxonomy, which in addition to species includes hybrids and other non-species entities reported by birders.

The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture

The Problem of Slavery in Western Culture written by David Brion Davis and published by Cornell University Press in 1966 won the Pulitzer Prize for General Non-Fiction in 1967. It was republished in 1988 by Oxford University Press

University of Virginia Press

The University of Virginia Press (or UVaP) is a university press that is part of the University of Virginia. It was established in 1963 as the University Press of Virginia, under the initiative of the university's then President, Edgar F. Shannon, Jr. Victor Reynolds, previously director of the Cornell University Press, was the first director.The first two publications of the press were reprints of works by Carl Bridenbaugh. The first original book, published in May 1964, was A Voyage to Virginia in 1609, Two Narratives, an edition of William Strachey's True Reportory and Silvester Jourdain's A Discovery of The Barmudas, edited by Folger Shakespeare Library director Louis Booker Wright. Walker Cowen was the second director of the press, and was succeeded by Nancy Essig in 1988. Penelope Kaiserlian served as director from 2001 until her retirement in 2012. The press's name was changed to the University of Virginia Press in 2002. Mark Saunders succeeded Kaiserlian as director after her retirement.

Vyatka electoral district (Russian Constituent Assembly election, 1917)

The Vyatka electoral district (Russian: Вятский избирательный округ) was a constituency created for the Russian Constituent Assembly election, 1917.

The electoral district covered the Vyatka Governorate. 8 out of 20 submitted candidate lists were disqualified. Cheremis ran on a joint list with the Popular Socialists.

William Alston

William Payne Alston (November 29, 1921 – September 13, 2009) was an American philosopher. He made influential contributions to the philosophy of language, epistemology, and Christian philosophy. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and taught at the University of Michigan, Rutgers University, University of Illinois, and Syracuse University.

Worker center

Worker centers are non-profit community-based mediating organizations that organize and provide support to communities of low wage workers who are not already members of a collective bargaining organization (such as a trade union) or have been legally excluded from coverage by U.S. labor laws. Many worker centers in the United States focus on immigrant and low-wage workers in sectors such as restaurant, construction, day labor and agriculture.

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