Corey Simon

Corey Jermaine Simon (born March 2, 1977) is a former American football defensive tackle who played eight seasons in the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for Florida State University (FSU), earned consensus All-American honors, and was a member of a BCS National Championship team. The Philadelphia Eagles chose him with the sixth overall pick in the 2000 NFL Draft, and he played professionally for the Eagles, Indianapolis Colts and Tennessee Titans. He was selected to the 2004 Pro Bowl.

Corey Simon
refer to caption
Simon in 2004
No. 90, 97, 96
Position:Defensive tackle
Personal information
Born:March 2, 1977 (age 42)
Boynton Beach, Florida
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:320 lb (145 kg)
Career information
High school:Blanche Ely
(Pompano Beach, Florida)
College:Florida State
NFL Draft:2000 / Round: 1 / Pick: 6
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Total tackles:246
Sacks:32.0
Forced fumbles:9
Fumble recoveries:3
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Early years

Simon was born in Boynton Beach, Florida.[1] He attended Blanche Ely High School in Pompano Beach, Florida, where he played for the Ely Mighty Tigers high school football team. As a senior, he was the Miami Herald's defensive player of the year, named to the All-USA squad by USA Today, and a Super Prep Dream Team selection.

College career

Simon accepted an athletic scholarship to attend Florida State University, where he played for coach Bobby Bowden's Florida State Seminoles football team from 1996 to 1999. He was considered to be the most dominating defensive lineman in college football. Following his senior season, Simon was a first-team All-Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) selection, and was recognized as a consensus first-team All-American.[2] He was also a finalist for the Lombardi Award and Outland Trophy. He ended his career at FSU by helping his team win a BCS National Championship. His 44 tackles behind the line of scrimmage tied the Seminoles' career record set by Ron Simmons.

Professional career

Philadelphia Eagles

The Philadelphia Eagles selected him in the first round (sixth pick overall) of the 2000 NFL Draft, and he played for the Eagles from 2000 until 2004. He started in four NFC Championship games during his six seasons with the Eagles. Philadelphia reached the Super Bowl once during these years, losing Super Bowl XXXIX to the New England Patriots, 24-21. After the 2004 season, the Eagles placed the franchise tag on Simon, which he refused to sign. After contract negotiations failed to produce a long-term deal, the Eagles lifted the franchise tag, making Simon an unrestricted free agent.

Indianapolis Colts

Simon signed with the Indianapolis Colts, for whom he played the entire 2005 season. In 2006, Simon underwent surgery, was placed on the Physically Unable to Perform / Non-Football Injury list during training camp, and did not play in any games. He did not attend Super Bowl XLI with other inactive players, and was not invited to the Super Bowl ring ceremony in June 2007. He was once coined "the missing piece to the Super Bowl puzzle".

On August 1, 2007, Colts owner Jim Irsay stated that Simon's release from the team was imminent once a settlement could be reached. The team announced Simon's termination on Saturday, August 4, 2007.

Tennessee Titans

On August 28, 2007, the Tennessee Titans signed Simon.

NFL statistics

Year Team GP COMB SOLO AST SACK FF FR FR YDS INT IR YDS AVG IR LNG TD PD
2000 PHI 16 52 38 14 9.5 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
2001 PHI 16 47 36 11 7.5 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
2002 PHI 14 40 33 7 2.0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
2003 PHI 16 40 32 8 7.5 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
2004 PHI 16 32 26 6 5.5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2005 IND 13 34 25 9 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
2007 TEN 4 1 0 1 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Career 95 246 190 56 32.0 9 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 14

[3]

Key

  • GP: games played
  • COMB: combined tackles
  • TOTAL: total tackles
  • AST: assisted tackles
  • SACK: sacks
  • FF: forced fumbles
  • FR: fumble recoveries
  • FR YDS: fumble return yards
  • INT: interceptions
  • IR YDS: interception return yards
  • AVG IR: average interception return
  • LNG: longest interception return
  • TD: interceptions returned for touchdown
  • PD: passes defensed

Retirement

On October 25, 2007, Corey Simon announced that he was retiring from Pro Football after eight seasons in the NFL because of polyarthritis.[4] He lives in Centerville, Florida, a northeastern suburb of Tallahassee.[5]

References

  1. ^ "Corey Simon". NFL. Retrieved October 23, 2010.
  2. ^ 2011 NCAA Football Records Book, Award Winners, National Collegiate Athletic Association, Indianapolis, Indiana, p. 11 (2011). Retrieved June 25, 2012.
  3. ^ "Corey Simon Stats". ESPN Internet Vnetures. Retrieved March 21, 2014.
  4. ^ Walker, Teresa M (October 26, 2007). "Titans' Corey Simon announces retirement". USA TODAY. Retrieved April 30, 2011.
  5. ^ "Simon fails physical exam". Indianapolis Star. July 31, 2007.

External links

1996 Florida State Seminoles football team

The 1996 Florida State Seminoles football team represented Florida State University in the 1996 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team was coached by Bobby Bowden and played their home games at Doak Campbell Stadium. The team was selected national champion by Alderson.Florida State completed just their third undefeated regular season, and for the second straight season, running back Warrick Dunn was a Heisman Trophy finalist.

1998 College Football All-America Team

The 1998 College Football All-America Team is composed of the following All-American Teams: Associated Press, Football Writers Association of America, American Football Coaches Association, Walter Camp Foundation, The Sporting News and Football News.

The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions. The original usage of the term All-America seems to have been to such a list selected by football pioneer Walter Camp in the 1890s. The NCAA officially recognizes All-Americans selected by the AP, AFCA, FWAA, TSN, and the WCFF to determine Consensus All-Americans.

1999 College Football All-America Team

The 1999 College Football All-America Team is composed of the following All-American Teams: Associated Press, Football Writers Association of America, American Football Coaches Association, Walter Camp Foundation, The Sporting News, Pro Football Weekly, Football News, and CNNSI.com.

The College Football All-America Team is an honor given annually to the best American college football players at their respective positions. The original usage of the term All-America seems to have been to such a list selected by football pioneer Walter Camp in the 1890s. The NCAA officially recognizes All-Americans selected by the AP, AFCA, FWAA, TSN, FN, and the WCFF to determine Consensus All-Americans.

1999 Florida State Seminoles football team

The 1999 Florida State Seminoles football team represented Florida State University during the college football season of 1999. Winning the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) Championship and winning the 2000 Sugar Bowl BCS National Championship game, the team was coached by Bobby Bowden and played their home games at Doak Campbell Stadium. The team entered the season with high expectations after losing to Tennessee in the inaugural BCS Championship game. FSU entered the 1999 pre-season ranked No. 1 in all national pre-season polls, picked unanimously to win the ACC and expected to contend for a national championship. The Seminoles finished 11-2 in 1998, extending their NCAA record to 13 straight seasons with at least 10 victories and ranked among the nation's top four teams.The Seminoles finished the 1999 season with a perfect 12-0 record and was the first in NCAA history to go "wire-to-wire" being ranked continuously as the nation's No. 1 team from the preseason through the bowl season. This marked the 13th consecutive season that the Seminoles will have finished in the Top 5 rankings of both the AP and coaches poll. The 2000 Sugar Bowl BCS National Championship game also marks the 17th consecutive season the Bowden lead Seminoles played in a bowl game.

2000 NFL Draft

The 2000 NFL draft was the procedure by which National Football League teams selected amateur U.S. college football players. It is officially known as the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting. The draft was held April 15–16, 2000, at the Theater at Madison Square Garden in New York City, New York. No teams chose to claim any players in the supplemental draft that year.

The draft started with Penn State teammates Courtney Brown and LaVar Arrington being selected consecutively, making them the only Penn State players to go number one and two in the same draft. The New York Jets had four first-round draft picks, the most by any team in the history of the draft (17 teams have had three picks but no other has had four).The draft was notable for the selection of Michigan quarterback Tom Brady at the 199th pick in the sixth round by the New England Patriots; Brady has gone on to win 3 NFL MVP awards, a record 6 Super Bowl titles and 4 Super Bowl MVPs. It was also the first year since 1966 that a pure placekicker was drafted in the first round, with the Oakland Raiders selecting Florida State's Sebastian Janikowski 17th overall. The University of Tennessee led all colleges with nine selections in the 2000 NFL draft.

2000 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 2000 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 68th season in the National Football League, and the second under head coach Andy Reid. They improved on their 5-11 record from 1999 and resulted in a postseason appearance for the first time since 1996. The season started in Dallas famously known for the onside kick that the Eagles kicked and recovered to start the game. This game is known as the Pickle Juice Game, as the Philadelphia players were given pickle juice by Andy Reid in order to prepare for the high temperature in Dallas that day.

This was Donovan McNabb's first full year as starting quarterback after seeing limited action during his rookie season. With McNabb, the team posted an 11–5 record. For his efforts, McNabb was named to the Pro Bowl following the season. He would make several more Pro Bowl appearances during his time in Philadelphia. The Eagles played in five NFC Championship games and a Super Bowl (2004) during the McNabb era.

The Eagles easily defeated the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the Wildcard round, but their season ended with a defeat to their rival and eventual NFC Champions, the New York Giants, in the Divisional Round.

In Week 5, running back Duce Staley broke his foot. He was later placed on injured reserve, ending his season. He rushed for 344 yards while active in five games.

2001 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 2001 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 69th season in the National Football League, and the third under head coach Andy Reid. the team made the postseason for the second consecutive time. After defeating the Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the Chicago Bears in the first two rounds, the Eagles advanced to the NFC Championship for the first time in 21 years, but lost 29-24 to the St. Louis Rams. The Rams progressed to the Super Bowl, but were unable to stop the New England Patriots, losing 20-17.

The 2001 season was the first of five Conference Championship game appearances for the Eagles with Donovan McNabb as starting quarterback and Andy Reid as head coach.

2004 Pro Bowl

The 2004 Pro Bowl was the NFL's all-star game for the 2003 season. The game was played on February 8, 2004, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii. The final score was NFC 55, AFC 52, the most points scored in a Pro Bowl game. Marc Bulger of the St. Louis Rams was the game's MVP.

2005 Philadelphia Eagles season

The 2005 Philadelphia Eagles season was the franchise's 73rd season in the National Football League, and the seventh under head coach Andy Reid. After making the playoffs every season since 2000 and winning the past four NFC East crowns, the Eagles failed to improve on their 13-3 record from 2004 and fell to 6-10, missing the playoffs for the first time since 1999. The main cause of this was due to injuries and contract disputes with players likeTerrell Owens and Brian Westbrook, and as a result it caused chaos upon the Eagles' chances in their post-Super Bowl season. In the 2004 season, Philadelphia had swept its division rivals, but they became the first team to reverse that feat in its next season, going 0–6 against the NFC East in 2005.

After the Super Bowl, the future looked bright for the team, but the onset of the Owens controversy in the summer began to cloud that outlook. The Eagles got out to a 3–1 record, but there were signs of trouble from the start. Contract disputes with Owens and Brian Westbrook created ugly distractions, and the team was criticized for not replacing departed defensive linemen Derrick Burgess and Corey Simon. Around the middle of the season, the injuries began to take a devastating toll. Quarterback Donovan McNabb, running back Brian Westbrook, wide receiver Todd Pinkston, offensive tackle Tra Thomas, defensive lineman Jerome McDougle, center Hank Fraley, cornerback Lito Sheppard, and running back Correll Buckhalter were all at some point lost for the season. Moreover, kicker David Akers and punter Dirk Johnson also battled injuries and missed time during the year.

The Owens situation boiled to a head in early November, with the team essentially suspending the outspoken receiver for the rest of the season. The rash of injuries, meanwhile, revealed a disturbing lack of depth on the team, especially in the quarterback position and defensive line. The Eagles lost eight of their final ten games, led at quarterback by the athletic, but inept, Mike McMahon.

In the seven games he did play, Owens caught six touchdowns with 763 receiving yards. Rookie Reggie Brown showed promise after Owens' suspension, grabbing four touchdowns, as did rookie running back Ryan Moats, who had three late-season touchdowns. The team's two Pro Bowlers came from the defense – middle linebacker Jeremiah Trotter and safety Brian Dawkins. However, for the most part, the Eagles' pass defense suffered due to the poor pass rush.

Atlantic Coast Conference football individual awards

The Atlantic Coast Conference honors players and coaches upon the conclusion of each college football season with the following individual honors as voted on by the Atlantic Coast Sports Media Association.

Blanche Ely High School

Blanche Ely High School is a high school located in Pompano Beach, Broward County, Florida. The school is named for Blanche Ely, former principal and social activist.In addition to Pompano Beach, Ely serves a portion of Deerfield Beach and a portion of Lauderdale-by-the-Sea.

Booger McFarland

Anthony Darelle "Booger” McFarland (born December 18, 1977) is a former American football defensive tackle. He played college football at Louisiana State University and was drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the first round of the 1999 NFL Draft. McFarland also played for the Indianapolis Colts, and won two Super Bowl rings in his career: one with the Buccaneers (Super Bowl XXXVII) and another with the Colts (Super Bowl XLI). He is the color analyst for Monday Night Football.

Brodrick Bunkley

Brodrick Bunkley (born November 23, 1983) is a former American football nose tackle. He was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in the first round of the 2006 NFL Draft. He played college football at Florida State. Bunkley also played for the Denver Broncos and New Orleans Saints.

Clay Ingram

Clay Ingram (born February 5, 1978) is a Republican politician from Florida. He served in the Florida House of Representatives from 2010 to 2018, representing parts of Escambia County.

Darnell Dockett

Darnell Maurice Dockett (born May 27, 1981) is a former American football defensive end who had a ten-season career playing for the Arizona Cardinals of the National Football League (NFL). He was drafted by the Cardinals in the third round of the 2004 NFL Draft. He played college football at Florida State University.

Dockett played defensive tackle for the first five seasons of his career until the Cardinals switched to a 3–4 defense, leading him to move to defensive end.

List of Florida State University athletes

Florida State University has graduated a large number of athletes. This includes graduates, non-graduate former students and current students of Florida State who are notable for their achievements within athletics, sometimes before or after their time at Florida State. Other alumni can be found in the list of Florida State University alumni; notable administration, faculty, and staff can be found on the list of Florida State University faculty. Intercollegiate sports teams at Florida State are called "Seminoles", and are run by the Florida State Athletics. The Athletics program runs Florida State's Hall of Fame, which has inducted many of FSU's greatest players throughout the program's history.

As a major competitor in college athletics, Florida State University has many notable alumni including student athletes, coaches and staff members. Many of the most notable members are listed in FSU's Hall of Fame and represent all major collegiate sports. A number of FSU alumni have found success in professional sports, with 123 active alumni competing in sports including basketball, football, baseball and golf. In addition, FSU has produced three Heisman Trophy winners in Chris Weinke, Charlie Ward, and Jameis Winston. Notable Seminoles in professional golf include Brooks Koepka, back to back U.S. Open champion (2017, 2018), Jeff Sluman, and Hubert Green, and Paul Azinger, PGA Championship(1993) and Ryder Cup Captain(2008).

Pompano Beach, Florida

Pompano Beach is a city in Broward County, Florida, United States, along the coast of the Atlantic Ocean just to the north of Fort Lauderdale. The nearby Hillsboro Inlet forms part of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway. As of the 2010 census the city's population was 99,845, Located 35 miles north of Miami, it is a principal city of the Miami metropolitan area, which was home to an estimated 6,012,331 people at the 2015 census.

Pompano Beach is currently in the middle of a redevelopment process to revitalize its beachfront and historic downtown. The city has also been listed as one of the top real estate markets, being featured in CNN, Money and the Wall Street Journal as one of the country's top vacation home markets. Pompano Beach Airpark, located within the city, is the home of the Goodyear Blimp Spirit of Innovation.

Rufus Brown

Rufus Brown (born July 18, 1980 in San Antonio, Texas) is a professional American football wide receiver/defensive back for the Arizona Rattlers in the Arena Football League.

Brown graduated from Austin High School in El Paso, Texas. He attended Florida State University, where he played football all four years. After playing on the championship team in 1999, he was a starter for the latter two of those years, graduating in 2002 with a degree in Information management. He signed with the Washington Redskins as an undrafted free agent in 2004. After playing on the team's scout team for most of the season, he made his National Football League debut early in 2005. After that season, he was allocated to the Hamburg Sea Devils, for whom he posted fifteen tackles. In 2005, he signed with the San Jose SaberCats, where he spent the 2005 and 2006 seasons on injured reserve.

Super Bowl XXXIX

Super Bowl XXXIX was an American football game played between the American Football Conference (AFC) champion New England Patriots and the National Football Conference (NFC) champion Philadelphia Eagles to decide the National Football League (NFL) champion for the 2004 season. The Patriots defeated the Eagles by the score of 24–21. The game was played on February 6, 2005, at Alltel Stadium in Jacksonville, Florida, the first time the Super Bowl was played in that city.

The Patriots, who entered the Super Bowl after compiling a 14–2 regular season record, became the most recent team to win consecutive Super Bowls (As of 2019). New England also became the second team after the Dallas Cowboys to win three Super Bowls in four years. The Eagles were making their second Super Bowl appearance after posting a 13–3 regular season record.

The game was close throughout, with the teams battling to a 14–14 tie by the end of the third quarter. The Patriots then scored 10 points in the 4th quarter with Corey Dillon's 2-yard touchdown run and Adam Vinatieri's 22-yard field goal. The Eagles then cut their deficit to 24–21, with quarterback Donovan McNabb's 30-yard touchdown pass to receiver Greg Lewis, with 1:48 remaining in the game but could not sustain the comeback. Overall, New England forced four turnovers, while Patriots wide receiver Deion Branch was named Super Bowl MVP for recording 133 receiving yards and tied the Super Bowl record with 11 catches.To avoid the possibility of an incident similar to the Super Bowl XXXVIII halftime show during the previous year, the league selected Paul McCartney as a "safe" choice to perform during Super Bowl XXXIX's halftime. The broadcast of the game on Fox was watched by an estimated 86 million viewers.

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