Corcoran, California

Corcoran is a city in Kings County, California, United States. Corcoran is located 17 miles (27 km) south-southeast of Hanford,[7] at an elevation of 207 ft (63 m).[5] It is part of the Hanford–Corcoran Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 24,813 (2010 census), up from 14,458 (2000 census). The California Department of Finance estimated that Corcoran's population was 22,691 on January 1, 2016.[8]

Corcoran is most famous as the site of the California State Prison, Corcoran, home to a number of notable inmates such as Charles Manson, and Juan Corona. The California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison, Corcoran is a separate facility that is also located in the city. As of January 1. 2015, the two prisons held a combined total of 9,592 inmates.[9] Inmates are counted as city residents by both the United States Census and the California Department of Finance. Thus, the incarcerated persons in the two prisons comprise just over 43% of the total population of Corcoran.

Corcoran, California
Amtrak station in Corcoran
Amtrak station in Corcoran
Location of Corcoran in Kings County, California.
Location of Corcoran in Kings County, California.
Corcoran, California is located in the United States
Corcoran, California
Corcoran, California
Location in the contiguous United States of America
Coordinates: 36°05′53″N 119°33′37″W / 36.09806°N 119.56028°WCoordinates: 36°05′53″N 119°33′37″W / 36.09806°N 119.56028°W
Country United States of America
State California
CountyFlag of Kings County, California.png Kings
IncorporatedAugust 11, 1914[1]
Government
 • City Council
  • Raymond Lerma (Mayor)
  • Sidonio Palmerin (Vice-Mayor)
  • Jerry Robertson
  • Jeanette Zamora-Bragg
  • Patricia Nolen
[2]
 • City ManagerKindon Meik[3]
Area
 • Total7.50 sq mi (19.44 km2)
 • Land7.50 sq mi (19.44 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)  0%
Elevation207 ft (63 m)
Population
 • Total24,813
 • Estimate 
(2016)[6]
22,626
 • Density3,015.19/sq mi (1,164.10/km2)
Time zoneUTC-8 (Pacific (PST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-7 (PDT)
ZIP code
93212
Area code(s)559
FIPS code06-16224
GNIS feature ID1652690
Websitewww.cityofcorcoran.com

Geography

Corcoran is located at 36°05′53″N 119°33′37″W / 36.09806°N 119.56028°W.[5]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 6.4 square miles (17 km2), all of it land.

Climate

Corcoran
Climate chart (explanation)
JFMAMJJASOND
 
 
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Average max. and min. temperatures in °F
Precipitation totals in inches
Source: US Climate Data[10]
Metric conversion
JFMAMJJASOND
 
 
38
 
 
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Average max. and min. temperatures in °C
Precipitation totals in mm

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
19201,101
19301,76860.6%
19402,09218.3%
19503,15050.6%
19604,97658.0%
19705,2495.5%
19806,45423.0%
199013,364107.1%
200014,4588.2%
201024,81371.6%
Est. 201622,626[6]−8.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]

2010

The 2010 United States Census[12] reported that Corcoran had a population of 24,813. The population density was 3,323.2 people per square mile (1,283.1/km²). The racial makeup of Corcoran was 8,940 (36.0%) White, 3,725 (15.0%) African American, 349 (1.4%) Native American, 193 (0.8%) Asian, 17 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 10,979 (44.2%) from other races, and 610 (2.5%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 15,545 persons (62.6%).

The Census reported that 12,573 people (50.7% of the population) lived in households, 116 (0.5%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 12,124 (48.9%) were institutionalized.

There were 3,594 households, out of which 1,981 (55.1%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 1,737 (48.3%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 781 (21.7%) had a female householder with no husband present, 376 (10.5%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 384 (10.7%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 19 (0.5%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 556 households (15.5%) were made up of individuals and 214 (6.0%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.50. There were 2,894 families (80.5% of all households); the average family size was 3.84.

The population was spread out with 4,434 people (17.9%) under the age of 18, 2,695 people (10.9%) aged 18 to 24, 10,203 people (41.1%) aged 25 to 44, 6,163 people (24.8%) aged 45 to 64, and 1,318 people (5.3%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.0 years. For every 100 females, there were 294.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 398.0 males.

There were 3,958 housing units at an average density of 530.1 per square mile (204.7/km²), of which 1,851 (51.5%) were owner-occupied, and 1,743 (48.5%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 1.7%; the rental vacancy rate was 11.8%. 6,607 people (26.6% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 5,966 people (24.0%) lived in rental housing units.

2000

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 14,458 people, 2,769 households, and 2,229 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,260.2 people per square mile (872.2/km²). There were 3,016 housing units at an average density of 471.5 per square mile (182.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 34.1% White, 14.2% Black or African American, 1.4% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 46.4% from other races, and 3.1% from two or more races. 59.6% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,769 households out of which 49.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.5% were married couples living together, 17.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.5% were non-families. 16.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.44 and the average family size was 3.83.

In the city, the population was spread out with 24.4% under the age of 18, 13.0% from 18 to 24, 42.0% from 25 to 44, 15.3% from 45 to 64, and 5.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females, there were 207.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 264.9 males. However, the statistics relating to the disparity between the male and female population in Corcoran is due to the prison's male only population.

Economy

At the time of the 2000 census, the median income for a household in the city was $30,783, and the median income for a family was $32,852. Males had a median income of $30,787 versus $21,792 for females. The per capita income for the city was only $13,458. It is noteworthy that about 23.4% of families and 26.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 36.4% of those under age 18 and 10.6% of those age 65 or over.

Many local residents are employed in agriculture. However, the community has been affected by the Great Recession as well as the decline of the cotton industry, the California drought and restrictions on pumping from the Sacramento River delta to protect endangered species. In November 2016, the unemployment rate was 11.1%.[14]

The largest employers in Corcoran include the California State Prison, Corcoran, the California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison, Corcoran, the Corcoran Unified School District, and the J. G. Boswell Company.[15]

Politics

Federally, Corcoran is located within California's 21st congressional district, and is represented by Democrat TJ Cox.

In the California State Legislature, Corcoran is located within:

Corcoran is represented on the Kings County Board of Supervisors by Richard Valle of Corcoran.

History

Corcoran was founded by Hobart Johnstone Whitley, a prominent land developer from southern California, who took the lead in building Corcoran (the main street of the community is named in his honor). Liking what he saw during a visit to the area in 1905 (a blacksmith shop, small store, scattered homes and a lush, untapped vista with herds of grazing wild hogs, horses and steers) Whitley purchased 32,000 acres (130 km2) to start development. Much like in the San Fernando Valley (Van Nuys and Canoga Park his "creations"), Whitley "leveraged" his holdings with the support of important Los Angeles businessmen. Whitley first intended the town be named "Otis", after Harrison Gray Otis of the Los Angeles Times, and streets as Otis, Sherman, Letts (the Broadway store) and Ross (after his son, Ross Whitley) show the connections. Whitley, it is claimed, purchased and platted some 150 towns over the American West—and Corcoran is one of his last.

Whitley moved a member of his real estate firm, J. W. Guiberson, to the area. Guiberson became one of the many pioneers of the community, building the first home and business structure in Corcoran. His family also helped establish the first church in the community, an event which helped lead to the town’s incorporation on August 14, 1914.

The basis of Corcoran’s economy then and now is agriculture. Initially, the most successful crops were grains, alfalfa and sugar beets.

The J. G. Boswell Company was established in Corcoran in 1921 and remains a major employer in the city.

The first post office opened in 1901.[7]

Education

Corcoran Unified School District is the public organization responsible for education in the town of Corcoran. The school district has seven schools.

  • Bret Harte
  • John C. Fremont
  • Mark Twain
  • John Muir Middle School
  • Corcoran High School
  • Corcoran Academy
  • Kings Lake Educational Center

Railroads

Corcoran is served by the BNSF Railway, which is the successor to the Santa Fe Railway. The mainline track through Corcoran was part of a route connecting the San Francisco Bay Area to Bakersfield, California. The track was constructed by the San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley Railway about 1898.

Today, Amtrak California's San Joaquin stops at Corcoran station.

From 1910-1934, the Kings Lake Shore Railroad operated a line that ran southwest from Corcoran to what is the now-extinct Tulare Lake.

On December 2, 2010, the California High-Speed Rail Authority Board voted to start construction of the first part of the California High-Speed Rail line at Borden near Madera and continue it to Corcoran. Construction began in 2012.[16]

References

  1. ^ "California Cities by Incorporation Date". California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Archived from the original (Word) on November 3, 2014. Retrieved August 25, 2014.
  2. ^ "Mayor & City Council". City of Corcoran. City of Corcoran. Retrieved 1 August 2017.
  3. ^ "City Manager". City of Corcoran. City of Corcoran. Retrieved 1 August 2017.
  4. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 19, 2017.
  5. ^ a b c U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Corcoran, California
  6. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  7. ^ a b Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Clovis, Calif.: Word Dancer Press. ISBN 1-884995-14-4.
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-07-01. Retrieved 2014-07-30.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ http://www.cdcr.ca.gov/Reports_Research/Offender_Information_Services_Branch/Monthly/TPOP1A/TPOP1Ad1412.pdf accessed December 29, 2015
  10. ^ "US Climate Data". Retrieved November 24, 2013.
  11. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  12. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Corcoran city". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  13. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  14. ^ http://www.labormarketinfo.edd.ca.gov/?pageid=133 accessed January 2, 2017
  15. ^ Kings County Economic Development Corporation Corcoran Community Profile
  16. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-12-06. Retrieved 2010-12-05.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link) accessed 12-4-10

Further reading

  • Arax, Mark; Wartzman, Rick (2003). The King of California, J.G. Boswell and the Making of a Secret American Empire. Public Affairs. ISBN 978-1-58648-028-8.

External links

Bean, California

Bean is a former settlement in Kings County, California. It was located on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad 3.25 miles (5.2 km) north-northwest of Corcoran, at an elevation of 210 feet (64 m). Bean still appeared on maps as of 1928.

Borden, California

Borden (formerly, Alabama Settlement and Arcola) is an unincorporated community in Madera County, California. It is located on the Southern Pacific Railroad 3 miles (4.8 km) southeast of Madera, at an elevation of 272 feet (83 m).The first settlers came from Alabama in 1858, whence its original name. The name Arcola comes from the plantation in Alabama owned by one of the settlers. The current name was bestowed by the railroad for civic leader, Dr. Joseph Borden. The Borden post office operated to 1873, closed for a time in 1896, and closed for good in 1907.On December 2, 2010, the California High-Speed Rail Authority Board voted to start construction of the first part of the California High-Speed Rail line at Borden and continue it to Corcoran, California. Construction is expected to begin in 2012.

California's 14th State Senate district

California's 14th State Senate district is one of 40 California State Senate districts. It is currently represented by Democrat Melissa Hurtado of Sanger.

California's 21st congressional district

California's 21st congressional district (or CA-21) is a congressional district in the U.S. state of California which is centered in the San Joaquin Valley, and includes areas of Fresno County, Kern County, Kings County, and Tulare County. Cities in it include Coalinga, Delano, Hanford, and outer parts of Bakersfield.

The district is represented in 2019 by Democrat TJ Cox. It was previously represented by Republican David Valadao from 2013–2019. Democrat Emilio Huerta, who lost to Valadao in 2016, had announced that he would run against Valadao again in the 2018 midterm elections. However, Huerta withdrew from the race on March 2, 2018, one week before the filing deadline to appear on the primary election ballot. On March 6, 2018, T. J. Cox, an engineer and small businessman, withdrew from the CA-10 primary race to instead run in CA-21 against Rep. Valadao. Cox defeated Valadao in the 2018 general election. In 2017, the District leaned 5 points more Democratic than the nation as a whole, according to the Cook Political Report's Partisan Voting Index.Formerly, from 2003–2013, the 21st district covered all of Tulare County and the eastern half of Fresno County.

California's 32nd State Assembly district

California's 32nd State Assembly district is one of 80 California State Assembly districts. It is currently represented by Democrat Rudy Salas of Bakersfield.

California State Prison, Corcoran

California State Prison, Corcoran (COR) is a male-only state prison located in the city of Corcoran, in Kings County, California. It is also known as Corcoran State Prison, CSP-C, CSP-COR, CSP-Corcoran, and Corcoran I. The facility is just north of the newer California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison, Corcoran (Corcoran II).

California State Route 137

State Route 137 (SR 137) is a state highway in California, USA, running from Corcoran to State Route 65 in the San Joaquin Valley.

California State Route 43

State Route 43 (SR 43) is a north–south state highway in the U.S. State of California, routed along the southern San Joaquin Valley connecting the towns of Shafter, Wasco, Corcoran, Hanford, and Selma, running roughly parallel to SR 99.

California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison, Corcoran

California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility and State Prison, Corcoran (SATF) is a male-only state prison located in the city of Corcoran, in Kings County, California specifically designed to house inmates who are drug addicts. It is sometimes referred to as California Substance Abuse Treatment Facility, and Corcoran II.

Chris DeFrance

Chris Anthony DeFrance (born September 13, 1956 in Waldo, Arkansas) is a former American football wide receiver in the National Football League for the Washington Redskins. He also was a member of the Saskatchewan Roughriders of the Canadian Football League. He played college football at Arizona State University.

Corcoran station

Corcoran is an unstaffed Amtrak train station in Corcoran, California, United States.

Felon (film)

Felon is a 2008 American prison film written and directed by Ric Roman Waugh. The film stars Stephen Dorff, Val Kilmer and Harold Perrineau. The film tells the story of the family man who ends up in state prison after he kills an intruder. The story is based on events that took place in the 1990s at the notorious California State Prison, Corcoran. The film was released in the United States on July 18, 2008.

H.J. Whitley

Hobart Johnstone Whitley (October 7, 1847 – June 3, 1931), also known as H.J. Whitley, is the "Father of Hollywood." He was a real estate developer who helped create the Hollywood subdivision in Los Angeles, Southern California. He and his wife Margaret Virginia Whitley named the town while on their honeymoon in 1886.

Helm Corner, California

Helm Corner is an unincorporated community in Kings County, California. It is located 4.5 miles (7.2 km) west of Corcoran, at an elevation of 194 feet (59 m).

Jesse Williams (Canadian football)

Jesse Ross "J. R." Williams (November 17, 1940 – September 17, 2015) was a Canadian football player who played for the BC Lions. He won the Grey Cup with them in 1964. He played college football at Fresno State University and Bakersfield College. Williams was inducted into the Bob Elias Kern County Sports Hall of Fame in 2001. After his football career he was a football coach, coaching at Arvin High School and Highland High School in Bakersfield. He died in 2015.

KBLO

KBLO (102.3 FM) is a radio station broadcasting a Christian Spanish format. Licensed to Corcoran, California, United States, the station serves the Visalia-Tulare-Hanford area. The station is currently owned by CCA License Holdings LLC.

Kings County, California

Kings County is a county in the U.S. state of California. The population was 152,982 at the 2010 census. The California Department of Finance estimated the county's population was 151,662 as of January 1, 2018. The county seat is Hanford.Kings County comprises the Hanford-Corcoran, CA metropolitan statistical area, which is also included in the Visalia-Porterville-Hanford, CA combined statistical area. It is in the San Joaquin Valley, a rich agricultural region.

Lake Corcoran

Lake Corcoran (also known as Lake Clyde, after Clyde Wahrhaftig, an American geophysicist) is an ancient lake that covered the Central Valley of California.

The lake existed in the valleys of the Sacramento River and the San Joaquin River. An alternate view presumes that the lake covered only the southern parts of the Central Valley. The total surface covered by the lake amounts to about 30,000–50,000 square kilometers (12,000–19,000 sq mi). Buena Vista Lake, Kern Lake and Tulare Lake are remnants of Lake Corcoran.The lake is the source of the Corcoran Clay, a lacustrine unit of the Tulare and Turlock Lake formations. It also influenced sedimentation off the coast of California.The lake existed between about 758,000 and 665,000 years ago. Clay deposition rates indicate that the lake lasted for 50,000 to 100,000 years. The Lava Creek Tuff of Yellowstone Caldera and the Bishop Tuff of the Long Valley Caldera were deposited in the Corcoran Clay. Before Lake Corcoran formed, the Central Valley was a bay open to the south via a passage, until 2 million years ago when the bay was separated from the ocean, probably due to northwestward movement of the Coast Ranges along the San Andreas Fault. Subsequently, the valley was no longer a bay and alternately drained and filled with water. The factors contributing to the formation of Lake Corcoran are not fully understood.The lake originally drained into Monterey Bay via the Salinas River, or at times not at all. Evaporation from this lake was a source of water for the Sierra Nevada and in lesser measure for the Basin and Range Province behind it. This contributed to the formation of large pluvial lakes in Nevada.600,000 years ago a new outlet formed in the present day San Francisco Bay, where it remains today. Sediments found south of San Francisco indicate that by 400,000 years ago the drainage was fully established. The overflow may have occurred at a time where glaciers were melting and when shifts in the jet stream during the marine oxygen isotope stage 6 caused increased precipitation in and runoff to the Central Valley. The overflow rapidly carved an outlet through Carquinez Strait, probably catastrophically, and drained the lake. The Upper Turbidite Unit of the Monterey submarine fan may have formed soon after this outflow, when sediment from the former lake was carried out of its new outlet and down to Monterey Bay by longshore drift.

South Corcoran, California

South Corcoran is an unincorporated community in Kings County, California. It is located on the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad 0.5 miles (0.8 km) south-southeast of Corcoran, at an elevation of 207 feet (63 m).

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