Copeland Bridge

Copeland Bridge, also known as Copeland Farm Bridge or Copeland Covered Bridge is a wooden covered bridge over Beecher Creek in the town of Edinburg in Saratoga County, New York. It was built in 1879, and is a small, timber framed, queenpost truss bridge with a gable roof. It has a 30-foot span carried on fieldstone abutments.[2]:3

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1998.[1]

Copeland Covered Bridge
COPELAND COVERED BRIDGE
Coordinates 43°13′16″N 74°06′04″W / 43.221°N 74.101°WCoordinates: 43°13′16″N 74°06′04″W / 43.221°N 74.101°W
CrossesBeecher Creek
Copeland Covered Bridge
Copeland Covered Bridge
Copeland Bridge is located in New York
Copeland Bridge
Copeland Bridge is located in the United States
Copeland Bridge
LocationNorth Shore Rd., over Beecher Cr., Edinburg, New York
Coordinates43°13′15″N 74°6′2″W / 43.22083°N 74.10056°WCoordinates: 43°13′15″N 74°6′2″W / 43.22083°N 74.10056°W
Area1 acre (0.40 ha)
Built1879
Built byCopeland, Arad
NRHP reference #98000998[1]
Added to NRHPAugust 6, 1998

References

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. ^ "Cultural Resource Information System (CRIS)" (Searchable database). New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2015-12-01. Note: This includes Raymond W. Smith (June 1998). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: Copeland Covered Bridge" (PDF). Retrieved 2015-12-01. and Accompanying photographs

External links

Cohoes Falls

Cohoes Falls [Kahon:ios, Mohawk for "Canoe Falls"] is a waterfall on the Mohawk River shared by the city of Cohoes and the town of Waterford, New York, United States. Discovered by the indigenous people, the falls were called Ga-ha-oose or Ga-ho'n'-yoos by the Mohawks, which is believed to mean "The Place of the Falling Canoe." Cohoes historian Arthur Masten wrote in his 1880 history that the phrase might mean "Potholes in the River," referring to the potholes that appear in the riverbed when it is dry. In the oral tradition of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois), the Cohoes Falls are the site where The Great Peacemaker, performed a feat of supernatural strength, convincing the Mohawk people to become the founders of the Iroquois League of Nations or Confederacy. Some historians believe the Mohawks launched the Confederacy as early as 1142 CE, though other experts report dates ranging from 1450-1650.

Celebrated by 18th-century travelers in letters and journals, the Cohoes Falls, also called The Great Falls of the Mohawk, were regarded as the second-most beautiful cataract in New York State after Niagara. In 1804, the national poet of Ireland, Thomas Moore, visited Cohoes and wrote a paean to the waterfall's beauty: "Lines Written at the Cohos, or Falls of the Mohawk River."

In 1831, town leaders built a dam across the Mohawk River to harness the power of the falls to fuel the turbines of the city's burgeoning textile industry. Over the next several decades, the predominant company, Harmony Mills, became the largest manufacturer of cotton in the United States, thanks to its control of local water rights. When all the mills closed in the wake of the Great Depression, city leaders neglected the potential of the falls for tourism. They leased the flow rights to a series of power companies, including Niagara Mohawk and Orion Power.

The Erie Canal was planned to overcome the navigational barrier of the Cohoes Falls. The original "Clinton's Ditch", the Erie Canal of 1825, was built through the city of Cohoes. The later Enlarged Canal was realigned, yet still went through the City of Cohoes. The Barge Canal, which opened in 1918, bypasses Cohoes and runs though the Village of Waterford via the Waterford Flight of Locks.

The Cohoes Falls is 90 feet (28 m) high and 1,000 feet (305 m) wide. Its flow is most impressive in springtime, sometimes running at 90,000 cubic feet (2,500 m3) of water per second, but as the season changes, there is less water for the falls because so much of the flow is diverted at the Crescent Dam to the Barge Canal through Lock 6. Most of the water is still diverted for power generation; some is diverted for the Cohoes water supply. During the summer, the falls are virtually dry, revealing shale rock formations that have their own distinctive beauty. The 87-year average flow of the Mohawk River at Cohoes is 34,638 cubic feet per second, but this includes water diverted to the power plant and Erie Canal locks.

East River

The East River is a salt water tidal estuary in New York City. The waterway, which is actually not a river despite its name, connects Upper New York Bay on its south end to Long Island Sound on its north end. It separates the borough of Queens on Long Island from the Bronx on the North American mainland, and also divides Manhattan from Queens and Brooklyn, which are also on Long Island. Because of its connection to Long Island Sound, it was once also known as the Sound River. The tidal strait changes its direction of flow frequently, and is subject to strong fluctuations in its current, which are accentuated by its narrowness and variety of depths. The waterway is navigable for its entire length of 16 miles (26 km), and was historically the center of maritime activities in the city, although that is no longer the case.

Jay Bridge

Jay Bridge is a wooden covered bridge that spans the east branch of the Ausable River in Jay, Essex County, New York, USA. It is eligible to be listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Of the 29 covered bridges in New York State, it and the Copeland Bridge in the town of Edinburg, Saratoga County are the only two situated in the Adirondacks.

List of covered bridges in New York

This is a list of covered bridges in New York State.

The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation identifies 29 covered bridges in New York State as historic, but these are not all listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The New York Society of Covered Bridges lists 24 historic covered bridges.One of the NRHPs, Old Blenheim Bridge, has further been declared to be a National Historic Landmark and also has described by a Historic American Engineering Record. It may be the longest single-span covered bridge in the United States or in the world.

Taroom

Taroom is a town in the Shire of Banana and locality split between the Shire of Banana and the Western Downs Region in Queensland, Australia. At the 2016 census, Taroom had a population of 869 people.

The Palisades (Hudson River)

The Palisades, also called the New Jersey Palisades or the Hudson River Palisades, are a line of steep cliffs along the west side of the lower Hudson River in Northeastern New Jersey and Southeastern New York in the United States. The cliffs stretch north from Jersey City about 20 miles (32 km) to near Nyack, New York, and visible at Haverstraw, New York. They rise nearly vertically from near the edge of the river, and are about 300 feet (90 m) high at Weehawken, increasing gradually to 540 feet (160 m) high near their northern terminus. North of Fort Lee, the Palisades are part of Palisades Interstate Park and are a National Natural Landmark.The Palisades are among the most dramatic geologic features in the vicinity of New York City, forming a canyon of the Hudson north of the George Washington Bridge, as well as providing a vista of the Manhattan skyline. They sit in the Newark Basin, a rift basin located mostly in New Jersey.

Palisade is derived from the same root as the word pale, ultimately from the Latin word palus, meaning stake. A "palisade" is, in general, a defensive fence or wall made up of wooden stakes or tree trunks. The Lenape called the cliffs "rocks that look like rows of trees", a phrase that became "Weehawken", the name of a town in New Jersey that sits at the top of the cliffs across from Midtown Manhattan.

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