Conspicuous Gallantry Cross

The Conspicuous Gallantry Cross (CGC) is a second level military decoration of the British Armed Forces. Created in 1993 and first awarded in 1995, it was instituted after a review of the British honours system to remove distinctions of rank in the awarding of gallantry decorations. The Victoria Cross is the only higher combat gallantry award presented by the United Kingdom.[4]

Conspicuous Gallantry Cross
Conspicuous Gallantry Cross obverse
Obverse of the medal. Ribbon: 32 mm, white with blue edges and a red central stripe
Awarded by Monarch of the United Kingdom
CountryUnited Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
TypeMilitary decoration
EligibilityBritish and allied forces
Awarded for... an act or acts of conspicuous gallantry during active operations against the enemy.[1]
StatusCurrently awarded
Description36mm max width; silver cross patée imposed on a wreath of laurel, with the Royal Crown in a circular panel in the centre. Suspended by a ring from a plain suspension bar
Statistics
EstablishedOctober 1993
First awarded1995
Total awarded60 including one unit award
Posthumous
awards
3
Order of Wear
Next (higher)Member of the Order of the British Empire[2]
Next (lower)Royal Red Cross, First Class[2][3]
UK Conspicuous Gallantry Cross ribbon

CGC ribbon bar

History

The CGC was instituted in the aftermath of the 1993 review of the honours system. As part of the drive to remove distinctions of rank in awards for bravery, the CGC replaced both the Distinguished Conduct Medal (Army) and the Conspicuous Gallantry Medal (Naval and Air) as second level awards to other ranks and ratings. The CGC also replaced the Distinguished Service Order (DSO), in its role as an award to officers for gallantry. The DSO was retained as an award for outstanding leadership. The CGC now serves as the second level award for gallantry for all ranks across the whole armed forces.

Eligibility

The CGC which may be awarded posthumously, is awarded "in recognition of an act or acts of conspicuous gallantry during active operations against the enemy". All ranks of the Royal Navy, Royal Marines, British Army, and Royal Air Force may be awarded the CGC in recognition of qualifying acts of gallantry.[4] Bars are awarded to the CGC in recognition of the performance of further acts of gallantry meriting the award. When the ribbon bar alone is worn, a silver rosette on the ribbon indicates the award of a bar.[5] Recipients are entitled to the postnominal letters CGC.[6]

Appearance

A Soldier Proudly Holds His Medals MOD 45153192
The CGC (left) as worn on a dress uniform with campaign medals. The medals shown are those awarded to Lance Corporal of Horse Andrew Radford, CGC.

The medal is in the shape of a cross pattée in silver. Arranged behind the cross, visible between the arms is a laurel wreath. On the obverse of the medal, the circular medallion in the centre depicts St. Edward's crown. The reverse is plain which allows room for the engraving of the rank, name, and unit of its recipient. The award date is also engraved on the reverse of the medal. The medal is suspended by a white ribbon with two narrow dark blue stripes at the edge and one centre stripe in crimson.[4]

Recipients

To date, there have been about 60 awards of the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross, including three posthumous and one unit award. No second award bars have been awarded.
The following is a full list of recipients who have been Gazetted to date.

Name Rank Service Date award announced Place
Mills, Wayne[7] Corporal Duke of Wellington's Regiment (West Riding) 9 May 1995 Bosnia and Herzegovina
Humphreys, Peter[8] Colour Sergeant Royal Welch Fusiliers 9 May 1996 Bosnia and Herzegovina
Baycroft, John David, MBE[9] Colour Sergeant Parachute Regiment 6 April 2001 Sierra Leone (Operation Barras)
MacFarlane, Iain James McKechnie[10] Squadron Leader Royal Air Force 6 April 2001 Sierra Leone (Operation Barras)
Day, Tony Kenneth[11] Corporal Royal Marines 29 October 2002 Afghanistan
Merchant, Jeremy Mark[11] Captain Royal Marines 29 October 2002 Afghanistan
Hearne, Karl Anthony[9] Corporal Parachute Regiment 29 October 2002 Afghanistan
Sanders, Edward Lawrence[11] Private Parachute Regiment 29 October 2002 Afghanistan
Thomas, Justin Royston[12] Marine Royal Marines 31 October 2003 Iraq
Flynn, Michael John[12] Lance Corporal of Horse Blues and Royals (Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons) 31 October 2003 Iraq
Jardine, Shaun Garry[13] Corporal King's Own Scottish Borderers 23 April 2004 Iraq
Robertson, Gordon[13] Sergeant Parachute Regiment 23 April 2004 Iraq
Greensmith, Benjamin Paul[14] Corporal Parachute Regiment 7 March 2008
(dated 7 September 2004)
Iraq
Broome, Christopher Mark[15] Sergeant Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment (Queen's and Royal Hampshires) 18 March 2005 Iraq
Bryan, Terry[15] Sergeant Royal Artillery 18 March 2005 Iraq
Thomson, Terence Alan[15] Corporal Princess of Wales's Royal Regiment (Queen's and Royal Hampshires) 18 March 2005 Iraq
Tomlinson, Matthew Robert[16] Colour Sergeant Royal Marines 24 March 2006 Iraq
Radford, Andrew[17] Lance Corporal of Horse Life Guards 14 December 2006 Afghanistan
Collins, John[18] Corporal Parachute Regiment 14 December 2006 Iraq
Harkess, James Royce[18] Colour Sergeant Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters Regiment (29th/45th Foot) 14 December 2006 Iraq
Farmer, Hugo[17] Lieutenant Parachute Regiment 14 December 2006 Afghanistan
Illingworth, Timothy[17] Acting Captain Light Infantry 14 December 2006 Afghanistan
Unit award[19] Royal Irish Regiment/Ulster Defence Regiment 19 December 2006
(dated 6 October 2006)
Northern Ireland
Thompson, John Thomas[20] Corporal Royal Marines 19 July 2007 Afghanistan
Hollingsworth, Jonathan Stuart,[21] QGM Sergeant Parachute Regiment 19 July 2007 Iraq (posthumous)
Campbell, Donald Peter[22] Acting Corporal Royal Engineers 7 March 2008 Afghanistan
Cupples, Simon Timothy[22] Lieutenant Mercian Regiment 7 March 2008 Afghanistan
Willmott, Paul Darren[22] Private Mercian Regiment 7 March 2008 Afghanistan
Miller, Adam William[23] Corporal Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers 7 March 2008 Iraq
Wadsworth, James Anthony[23] Staff Sergeant Royal Logistic Corps 7 March 2008 Iraq
McClurg, Robert William Kerr[24] Corporal Royal Irish Regiment (27th (Inniskilling), 83rd, 87th and Ulster Defence Regiment) 6 March 2009 Afghanistan
Stevens, Alwyn John[24] Acting Sergeant Royal Irish Regiment (27th (Inniskilling), 83rd, 87th and Ulster Defence Regiment) 6 March 2009 Afghanistan
Toge, Jone Bruce[24] Lance Corporal Royal Irish Regiment (27th (Inniskilling), 83rd, 87th and Ulster Defence Regiment) 6 March 2009 Afghanistan
Durber, Leonard John[25] Colour Sergeant Parachute Regiment 6 March 2009 Iraq
Malone, Bradley[26] Acting Corporal Royal Marines 11 September 2009 Afghanistan
Nethery, Steven[27] Marine Royal Marines 11 September 2009 Afghanistan
Dennis, Alan Gordon[28] Sergeant Mercian Regiment 19 March 2010 Afghanistan
Gadsby, Stephen William[28] Gunner Royal Artillery 19 March 2010 Afghanistan
Giles, Marc Kevin[28] Sergeant Mercian Regiment 19 March 2010 Afghanistan
Moncho, Jaime[28] Sergeant[29] The Rifles 19 March 2010 Afghanistan
Prout, Gary[28] Lance Bombardier Royal Artillery 19 March 2010 Afghanistan
Smith, Kyle Patrick[28] Lance Corporal Mercian Regiment 19 March 2010 Afghanistan
Turner, Robert[30] Sergeant Royal Marines 24 September 2010 Afghanistan
Bourne-Taylor, Robin Edwin Geoffrey[30] Captain Life Guards 24 September 2010 Afghanistan
Brownson, Lee[30] Corporal The Rifles 24 September 2010 Afghanistan (posthumous)
Horn, Graham Stuart[30] Lance Corporal Parachute Regiment 24 September 2010 Afghanistan
McKie, James Lee[30] Lance Corporal The Rifles 24 September 2010 Afghanistan
Pun, Dip Prasad[31] Acting Sergeant Royal Gurkha Rifles 25 March 2011 Afghanistan
Jackson, Mark Anthony[31] Marine Royal Marines 25 March 2011 Afghanistan
Stephens, Seth Vincent Scott[31] Corporal Royal Marines 25 March 2011 Afghanistan (posthumous)
Cutterham, Deacon[32] Sergeant The Rifles 23 March 2012 Afghanistan
Wright-Hider, Simon[32] Corporal Royal Marines 23 March 2012 Afghanistan
Couzens, Scott Allan[33] Staff Sergeant Parachute Regiment 28 September 2012 Afghanistan
Fort, Jay
Corporal Parachute Regiment 30 September

2012

Afghanistan
Glancy, James Alexander[34] Captain Royal Marines 22 March 2013 Afghanistan
Mason, Luke Timothy John[34] Lieutenant Yorkshire Regiment (14th/15th, 19th and 33rd/76th Foot) 22 March 2013 Afghanistan
Davis, Owen Edward[35] Lieutenant Royal Marines 4 October 2013 Afghanistan
Griffiths, Josh Edward Hayden[35] Corporal Mercian Regiment 4 October 2013 Afghanistan
Steel, Gareth David[35] Private Parachute Regiment 4 October 2013 Afghanistan
Stazicker, Anthony[36] Corporal Royal Marines 21 March 2014 Afghanistan
Moloney, Simon George[36] Lance Corporal Blues and Royals (Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons) 21 March 2014 Afghanistan

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "Military Honours and Awards". Archived from the original on 27 September 2007. Retrieved 10 October 2006.
  2. ^ a b "JSP 761 Honours and Awards in the Armed Forces" (PDF). p. 12A-1. Retrieved 7 November 2014.
  3. ^ "No. 56878". The London Gazette (Supplement). 17 March 2003. p. 3351.
  4. ^ a b c "Conspicuous Gallantry Cross". MOD Medal Office. Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 10 November 2011.
  5. ^ Online Medals: Conspicuous Gallantry Cross, (Accessed 8 June 2018).
  6. ^ "Honours & Gallantry Awards". mod.uk/. Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 10 November 2011.
  7. ^ "No. 54028". The London Gazette (Supplement). 5 May 1995. p. 6612.
  8. ^ "No. 54393". The London Gazette. 9 May 1996. p. 6547.
  9. ^ a b "No. 57936". The London Gazette (Supplement). 24 March 2006. p. 4197.
  10. ^ "No. 57751". The London Gazette (Supplement). 9 September 2005. p. 11648.
  11. ^ a b c "No. 57588". The London Gazette (Supplement). 18 March 2005. p. 3378.
  12. ^ a b "No. 57100". The London Gazette (Supplement). 31 October 2003. p. 4.
  13. ^ a b "No. 57269". The London Gazette (Supplement). 23 April 2004. p. 5132.
  14. ^ "No. 58633". The London Gazette (Supplement). 7 March 2008. p. 3619.
  15. ^ a b c "No. 57588". The London Gazette (Supplement). 18 March 2005. p. 3374.
  16. ^ "No. 57936". The London Gazette (Supplement). 24 March 2006. p. 4195.
  17. ^ a b c "No. 58183". The London Gazette (Supplement). 15 December 2006. p. 17357.
  18. ^ a b "No. 58183". The London Gazette (Supplement). 15 December 2006. p. 17359.
  19. ^ It is the first and only time an individual gallantry award has been awarded to a military unit. Unlike the 1942 George Cross to Malta and the 1999 George Cross to the Royal Ulster Constabulary, the award to The Royal Irish Regiment was gazetted. See: "No. 58186". The London Gazette (Supplement). 19 December 2006. p. 17495.
  20. ^ "No. 58396". The London Gazette (Supplement). 19 July 2007. p. 10411.
  21. ^ "No. 58396". The London Gazette (Supplement). 19 July 2007. p. 10413.
  22. ^ a b c "No. 58633". The London Gazette (Supplement). 7 March 2008. p. 3613.
  23. ^ a b "No. 58633". The London Gazette (Supplement). 7 March 2008. p. 3615.
  24. ^ a b c "No. 58999". The London Gazette (Supplement). 16 March 2009. p. 4082.
  25. ^ "No. 58999". The London Gazette (Supplement). 16 March 2009. p. 4085.
  26. ^ "No. 59211". The London Gazette. 13 October 2009. p. 17559.
  27. ^ "No. 59182". The London Gazette (Supplement). 11 September 2009. p. 15640.
  28. ^ a b c d e f "No. 59366". The London Gazette (Supplement). 19 March 2010. p. 4834.
  29. ^ Spelling is correct: this form is used by The Rifles.
  30. ^ a b c d e "No. 59554". The London Gazette (Supplement). 24 September 2010. p. 18536.
  31. ^ a b c >"No. 59737". The London Gazette (Supplement). 25 March 2011. p. 5640.
  32. ^ a b "No. 60095". The London Gazette (Supplement). 23 March 2012. p. 5848.
  33. ^ "No. 60283". The London Gazette (Supplement). 28 September 2012. p. 18624.
  34. ^ a b "No. 60456". The London Gazette (Supplement). 22 March 2013. p. 5738.
  35. ^ a b c "Operational Honours and Awards List: 4 October 2013 – News stories – GOV.UK".
  36. ^ a b "No. 60813". The London Gazette (Supplement). 21 March 2014. p. 5836.

References

  • Mackay, J and Mussell, J (eds) – Medal Yearbook – 2007, (2006), Token Publishing, Honiton, Devon
1st Regiment Royal Horse Artillery

1st Regiment Royal Horse Artillery is a regiment of the Royal Horse Artillery in the British Army. It currently serves in the armoured field artillery role, and is equipped with the AS90 self-propelled gun. The regiment is currently based at Larkhill Garrison, Larkhill. The Regiment completed its move from Assaye Barracks, Tidworth to Larkhill in June 2019.

2014 Special Honours

As part of the British honours system, the Special Honours are issued at the Queen's pleasure at any given time. The Special Honours refer to the awards of the Order of the Garter, Order of the Thistle, Order of Merit, Royal Victorian Order and the Order of St John. Life Peerages are at times also awarded as special honours.

Conspicuous Gallantry Medal

The Conspicuous Gallantry Medal (CGM) was, until 1993, a British military decoration for gallantry in action for petty officers and seaman of the Royal Navy, including Warrant Officers and other ranks of the Royal Marines. It was formerly awarded to personnel of other Commonwealth countries. In 1943 a Royal Air Force version was created for conspicuous gallantry in action against the enemy in the air.

Dipprasad Pun

Dipprasad Pun, CGC (Nepali: दिपप्रसाद पुन) is a Nepalese sergeant of the Royal Gurkha Rifles who was decorated with the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross for an act of bravery during the War in Afghanistan on the night of 17 September 2010. Pun, then an acting sergeant, single-handedly defeated 12 to 30 Taliban insurgents who were storming his control post near Babaji in Helmand province.

Distinguished Conduct Medal

The Distinguished Conduct Medal, post-nominal letters DCM, was established in 1854 by Queen Victoria as a decoration for gallantry in the field by other ranks of the British Army. It is the oldest British award for gallantry and was a second level military decoration, ranking below the Victoria Cross, until its discontinuation in 1993 when it was replaced by the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross. The medal was also awarded to non-commissioned military personnel of other Commonwealth Dominions and Colonies.

Gallantry Cross

The Gallantry Cross or Cross of Gallantry may refer to one of several military decorations:

The Conspicuous Gallantry Cross, awarded by the United Kingdom for "an act or acts of conspicuous gallantry during active operations against the enemy".

The Police Cross for Conspicuous Gallantry, awarded by the British South African Police in Rhodesia.

The South African Police Silver Cross for Gallantry, awarded by the South African Police for "conspicuous and exceptional gallantry".

The Gallantry Cross (Vietnam) or Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry, awarded by South Vietnam to soldiers and units "accomplishing deeds of valor or displayed heroic conduct while fighting an enemy force".

The Air Gallantry Cross and Navy Gallantry Cross, awarded by South Vietnam for aerial and naval actions in which a Gallantry Cross may be awarded.

Hilal-i-Jur'at

The Hilal-i-Jur'at (Urdu: ہلال جرات‎ [ɦəˈlaːl ə dʒʊˈraːt̪], as if it were Halāl-e-Jurāt; English: Crescent of Courage , sometimes spelled as Hilal-e-Jur'at, Hilal-e-Jurat, Hilal-i-Jurrat and Hilal-i-Juraat) is the second-highest military award of Pakistan out of a total of four gallantry awards that were created in 1957. In order of rank it comes after the Nishan-i-Haider (the Sign of the Lion, which is the equivalent to the Victoria Cross and the Medal of Honor under the British Honours System and the United States Honors System, respectively) coming before the Sitara-i-Ju'rat (the Star of Courage, which is the equivalent of the Distinguished Service Cross and the Silver Star, respectively).It was created and declared for official use on 16 March 1957 by the President of Pakistan. The Hilal-i-Ju'rat is considered to be the equivalent of the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross and the Distinguished Service Cross. The medal is only conferable to those who are ranked at an Officer level only and it is only allowed to be given to the Army (excluding paramilitary personnel), Navy and Air-force. The award after this honour is the Sitara-i-Ju'rat (Star of Courage), and subsequent to this medal is the Tamgha-i-Ju'rat (Medal of Courage).Unlike the Nishan-i-Haider, the Hilal-i-Ju'rat is the highest military award thus far that has been given to living Pakistanis to date. The medallion has been given to many famous Pakistani army personal, including many national heroes. Most notably, well known major generals, brigadiers and lieutenants of the Pakistan Armed Forces have all received the medal.The award holds significant benefits for the recipient including social, political and financial benefits. Land and pensions are awarded as recompense for serving in the Army of Pakistan on behalf of the State for acts of "valour and courage" during battle against the enemy. As of 2003 it was revealed that cash rewards have replaced land being given to the recipient under new defence housing schemes, which had taken place for the duration of the past twelve years perpetrated by the army, which was accounted to the Pakistan National Assembly as reported in the last decade.

James Glancy

James Alexander Glancy, (born 1981/1982) is a British television presenter, conservationist, politician and former member of the Royal Marine Commandos. He has been a Brexit Party Member of the European Parliament (MEP) for South West England since 2019.

Jon Hollingsworth

Sergeant Jonathan Stuart Hollingsworth (7 February 1971 – 23 November 2006) was a British Army soldier. Described as "an SAS hero" by a British tabloid newspaper, he reportedly sustained gunshot wounds during a raid to capture terror leaders in Basra and later died of his injuries at a nearby military hospital.

List of British gallantry awards for the Iraq War

A list of British awards for gallantry in the Iraq War, awarded between 2003 and 2010. Apart from appointments to purely military orders, only gallantry awards have been included and only those that allow post-nominal letters (this excludes appointments to the Order of the British Empire for distinguished service and fourth-level awards such as Mentions-in-Despatches and Queen's Commendations).

The list includes the rank and decorations the recipient held at the time, together with their regiment, corps or service, and the date of publication of the award in the London Gazette. The first honours list was published in October 2003, and covered the initial invasion period from 19 March to 19 April. Thereafter lists covered six month periods of operations, ending in March or September, normally being published several months later. The final list was published in March 2010.

List of British gallantry awards for the War in Afghanistan (2001–present)

A list of British awards for gallantry in the War in Afghanistan from 2001 onwards. Apart from appointments to purely military orders, only gallantry awards have been included and only those that allow post-nominal letters (this excludes appointments to the Order of the British Empire for distinguished service and fourth-level awards such as Mentions-in-Despatches and Queen's Commendations).

The list includes the rank and decorations the recipient held at the time, together with their regiment, corps or service, and the date of publication of the award in the London Gazette. The first honours list was published in October 2002, covering the period from October 2001 to March 2002, and subsequent lists have each covered six month periods of operations, ending in March or September. The latest list was published in July 2015 and covered the period ending 31 December 2014.

Michael Rizzello

Michael Gaspard Rizzello (2 April 1926 – 28 September 2004) was a sculptor and designer.Rizzello was born in London of Italian parents. His father was a tailor. He attended the London Oratory School and did not want to follow his father's profession. He enlisted in the army in 1944, and was demobbed in 1948. He was a good baritone singer and had to choose between music and drawing; he chose the latter. He attended the Royal College of Art winning both the Drawing Prize and Travelling Scholarship in Sculpture. This led to study in Italy, sculpture in Rome for two years, and he was awarded the Prix de Rome 1951 for Sculpture. He began his career making wax heads for Madame Tussauds.

He served an unprecedented term of two 5-year periods as President of the Royal Society of British Sculptors. His public statuary includes Dancer with Ribbon in Oxford Street, London (the Plaza, the old Bourne & Hollingsworth). His David Lloyd George stands in Cathays Park, Cardiff, and other portrait busts include Nelson Mandela.Rizzello also designed coins and medals, including the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross and the £2 coin commemorating the 50th anniversary of the United Nations, both in 1995.He was made an OBE in the 1977 Silver Jubilee and Birthday Honours list.He died in London, England. A posthumous exhibition of his work was shown in the Mall Galleries in April 2005.He married Sheila Maguire in 1950; she died in 2002. They had one daughter, who survived them.

Mick Flynn

Michael John "Mick" Flynn, (born 1960) is one of the British Army's most decorated members in recent years.Flynn was born in Cardiff, Wales, in 1960. He joined the British Army and served in the Blues and Royals. He has seen active service in Northern Ireland, the Falklands War, the Bosnian War, the Iraq War and the War in Afghanistan. In 2003 he was awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross as a lance corporal of horse when serving with D Squadron, Blues and Royals in Iraq. In August 2006 Corporal of Horse Flynn was awarded the Military Cross in Helmand province, southern Afghanistan, in action against the Taliban.

Military Cross

The Military Cross (MC) is the third-level military decoration awarded to officers and (since 1993) other ranks of the British Armed Forces, and formerly awarded to officers of other Commonwealth countries.

The MC is granted in recognition of "an act or acts of exemplary gallantry during active operations against the enemy on land" to all members of the British Armed Forces of any rank. In 1979, the Queen approved a proposal that a number of awards, including the Military Cross, could be recommended posthumously.

Robin Bourne-Taylor

Robin Edwin Geoffrey Bourne-Taylor, CGC (born 22 July 1981 in George Town, Grand Cayman) is a former British officer and sportsman. He is a three times Boat Race winner, and for his service in Afghanistan he was awarded the second-highest British gallantry medal.

Royal Irish Regiment (1992)

The Royal Irish Regiment (27th (Inniskilling) 83rd and 87th and Ulster Defence Regiment) (R IRISH) is an infantry regiment of the British Army. The regiment was founded in 1992 through the amalgamation of the Royal Irish Rangers and the Ulster Defence Regiment. Their oldest predecessor; the 27th Regiment of Foot; was first raised in June 1689 to fight in the Williamite War in Ireland. Other notable regiments in their lineage include the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, Royal Irish Rifles and the Royal Irish Fusiliers (Princess Victoria's).

The motto of the regiment is Faugh A Ballagh (Modern Irish: Fág an Bealach), derived from the Irish Gaelic phrase for "Clear the Way". This originates from the Peninsular War, when Ensign Edward Keogh of the 87th Regiment of Foot let out the cry while capturing a French Imperial Eagle at the Battle of Barrosa. The Regimental Headquarters of the Royal Irish Regiment has been Palace Barracks, Holywood in County Down, Northern Ireland since moving there in 2008.

Ulster Defence Regiment

The Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) was an infantry regiment of the British Army established in 1970, with a comparatively short existence ending in 1992. Raised through public appeal, newspaper and television advertisements, their official role was the "defence of life or property in Northern Ireland against armed attack or sabotage" but unlike troops from Great Britain they were never used for "crowd control or riot duties in cities". It was the largest infantry regiment in the British Army, formed with seven battalions plus another four added within two years.It consisted mostly of part-time volunteers until 1976, when a full-time cadre was added. Recruiting in Northern Ireland at a time of intercommunal strife, some of its (mostly Ulster Protestant) members were involved in sectarian killings. The regiment was originally intended to more accurately reflect the demographics of Northern Ireland, and began with Catholic recruits accounting for 18% of its soldiers; but by the end of 1972, after the introduction of internment this had dropped to around 3%. It is doubtful if any other unit of the British Army has ever come under the same sustained criticism as the UDR.Uniquely in the British Army, the regiment was on continuous active service throughout its 22 years of service. It was also the first infantry regiment of the British Army to fully incorporate women into its structure.In 1992, the UDR was amalgamated with the Royal Irish Rangers to form the Royal Irish Regiment.

In 2006, the regiment was retroactively awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross, which entitled it to be known as The Ulster Defence Regiment CGC.

Wayne Mills (British Army soldier)

Wayne Kevin Mills CGC is a former British Army soldier. He was the first gazetted recipient of the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross for his actions during active operations in Bosnia in 1994.

While serving with the 1st Battalion The Duke of Wellington's Regiment (West Riding) on United Nations service in Bosnia on 29 April 1994, a patrol led by Corporal Mills came under heavy small arms fire from a group of Bosnian Serbs. The patrol returned fire, killing two of the attackers. The patrol moved away back towards their base and soon reached an open clearing, where it was obvious they would be highly vulnerable to fire from the attackers. Mills then performed his feat of bravery. Turning round, back into the wood, he engaged the attacking group, delaying them long enough to allow the rest of his patrol to cross the clearing. Mills shot the leader of the group, causing the rest to scatter. He returned to his patrol safely.

Orders
Current
awards
Obsolete
awards
Royal family
orders

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.