Congressional Quarterly

Congressional Quarterly, Inc., or CQ, is part of a privately owned publishing company called CQ Roll Call that produces a number of publications reporting primarily on the United States Congress. CQ was acquired by the Economist Group and combined with Roll Call to form CQ Roll Call in 2009. As of 2009, CQ ceased to exist as a separate entity, and in July 2018, a deal was announced for the company to be acquired by FiscalNote.[1]

Overview

CQ Building Entrance
Since April 2011, the merged CQ Roll Call has been located in the NoMa neighborhood of Washington, D.C.

CQ was founded in 1945 by Nelson Poynter and his wife, Henrietta Poynter, with the aim of providing a link between local newspapers and the complex politics within Washington, D.C. CQ has the largest news team covering Capitol Hill, with more than 100 reporters, editors and researchers. CQ's readership includes 95 percent of the members of Congress, academic and media outlets, as well as members of business and nonprofit organizations, government affairs and the executive branch.

Thomas N. Schroth, who had been managing editor of The Brooklyn Eagle, was elected in October 1955 as executive editor and vice president.[2] Schroth built the publication's impartial coverage, with annual revenue growing during his tenure from $150,000 when he started to $1.8 million. In addition to adding a book division, Schroth added many staff members who achieved future journalistic success, including David S. Broder, Neal R. Peirce, and Elizabeth Drew. He was fired from Congressional Quarterly in 1969 after festering disagreements with Poynter over editorial policy at the publication and Schroth's efforts to advocate "more imaginative ways of doing things" reached a boil.[3]

In 1965, Poynter summed up his reasons for founding CQ, saying: "The federal government will never set up an adequate agency to check on itself, and a foundation is too timid for that. So it had to be a private enterprise beholden to its clients." Despite its name, CQ was published quarterly for only one year. Demand drove more frequent updates, first weekly, then daily. CQ was also an early leader in delivering information on a real-time basis, starting with a dial-up service in 1984. Its website dominates the market for online legislative tracking information and has been nominated for several awards. In recent years, CQ has launched several web-only newsletters with greater focus on particular areas, including CQ Homeland Security, CQ BudgetTracker, and CQ HealthBeat.

In 2005, CQ's flagship publication, the Weekly Report, was relaunched as CQ Weekly with a wider focus, including "government, commerce and politics." A daily publication, CQ Today, also is available every day when Congress is in session. CQ Today's main print competition is Atlantic Media's CongressDaily.

Until 2009, CQ was owned by the Times Publishing Company of St. Petersburg, Fla., publisher of the Tampa Bay Times (formerly the St. Petersburg Times) and other publications. The Times Publishing Company is in turn owned by the Poynter Institute, a school for journalists founded by Nelson Poynter. The Economist Group acquired CQ; the terms of the deal were not disclosed.[4]

Awards

Eight CQ reporters have won the "Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for Distinguished Reporting of Congress" from the National Press Foundation: Alan Ehrenhalt in 1983, Joan Biskupic in 1991, Janet Hook in 1992, George Hager in 1996, Jackie Koszczuk in 1997, Sue Kirchhoff in 2000, John Cochran in 2003, and Jonathan Allen in 2008.[5]

In 1999, CQ Executive Conferences was transferred to TheCapitol.Net, a non-partisan firm based in Alexandria, Virginia. TheCapitol.Net is no longer an affiliate of Congressional Quarterly.

In May 2008, CQ Press was purchased by SAGE Publications in its entirety.[6] Although it retains the name "CQ Press" (a trademark of Congressional Quarterly), CQ Press is no longer an affiliate of Congressional Quarterly.

See also

References

  1. ^ Calderone, Michael (2018-07-25). "Economist Group to sell CQ Roll Call to FiscalNote". Politico.
  2. ^ Via United Press International. "Schroth Heads Quarterly", The New York Times, October 30, 1955. Accessed August 5, 2009.
  3. ^ Weber, Bruce. "Thomas N. Schroth, Influential Washington Editor, Is Dead at 88", The New York Times, August 4, 2009. Accessed August 5, 2009.
  4. ^ The Guardian, "The Economist Group Buys Congressional Quarterly", July 22, 2009
  5. ^ "Everett McKinley Dirksen Awards for Distinguished Reporting of Congress, Past Winners 1980-2008". National Press Foundation. Archived from the original on 2009-01-27.
  6. ^ "SAGE acquires CQ Press, Book-Publishing Unit of Congressional Quarterly Inc" (PDF). SAGE Publications. May 30, 2008.

External links

CQ Press

CQ Press, a division of SAGE Publishing, publishes books, directories, periodicals, and electronic products on American government and politics, with an expanding list in international affairs and journalism and mass communication.

Campaigns and Elections

Campaigns & Elections is a trade magazine covering political campaigns, focused on tools, tactics, and techniques of the political consulting profession. The magazine was founded by Stanley Foster Reed in 1980. It is headquartered in Arlington, Virginia.

The magazine is an exclusively digital publication. It was formerly published by Congressional Quarterly. The publication has an auxiliary website, The Political Pages, an annual directory of political firms and professionals. The magazine runs conferences and events focusing on political campaign skills and technology. The publication also has a Spanish language sister publication, Campaigns & Elections Mexico.The publication presents the annual Reed Awards, first given in 2009, which award excellence in political campaigning, campaign management, political consulting, and political design.

Chairman of the Senate Republican Conference

The Republican conference of the United States Senate chooses a conference chairperson. The office was created in the mid-19th century with the founding of the Republican party. The office of "party floor leader" was not created until 1925, and for twenty years, the Senate's Republican conference chairman was also the floor leader.

In recent years, the conference chair has come to be regarded as the third-ranking Republican in the Senate, behind the floor leader and whip. According to Congressional Quarterly, "The conference chairman manages the private meetings to elect floor leaders, handles distribution of committee assignments and helps set legislative priorities. The modern version drives the conference’s message, with broadcast studios for television and radio."

Craig Crawford

Craig Crawford (born 1956) is an American writer and television political commentator based in Washington, D.C. Publisher of the news commenting forum, Trail Mix, Crawford was a columnist for Congressional Quarterly, Editor-in-Chief of National Journal's The Hotline, and Washington Bureau Chief for The Orlando Sentinel, and the author of Listen Up Mr. President: Everything You Always Wanted Your President to Know and Do, The Politics of Life: 25 Rules for Survival in a Brutal and Manipulative World, and Attack the Messenger: How Politicians Turn You Against the Media.

Federal News Service

Federal News Service (FNS) is a Washington, D.C.-based company providing transcription services. FNS produces on-demand verbatim transcripts of newsworthy events in DC (including speeches, congressional hearings, and interviews) for its clients. FNS "is one of the chief sources of transcripts from presidential appearances and Capitol Hill events."

Governing (magazine)

Governing is a national monthly magazine, edited and published since 1987 in Washington, D.C., whose subject area is state and local government in the United States. The magazine covers policy, politics and the management of government enterprises. Its subject areas include such issues as government finance, land use, economic development, the environment, technology and transportation.

Governing was published by Washington, D.C.–based Congressional Quarterly, Inc., a subsidiary of the Times Publishing Co. of St. Petersburg, Florida. In 1994, Governing acquired its primary competitor, City & State magazine, and that publication was merged into Governing. In 2009, it was sold to e.Republic.

History of health care reform in the United States

The history of health care reform in the United States has spanned many years with health care reform having been the subject of political debate since the early part of the 20th century. Recent reforms remain an active political issue. Alternative reform proposals were offered by both of the major candidates in the 2008 and 2016 presidential elections.

History of the United States Senate

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States. Like its counterpart, the Senate was established by the United States Constitution and convened for its first meeting on March 4, 1789 at Federal Hall in New York City. The history of the institution begins prior to that date, at the 1787 Constitutional Convention, in James Madison's Virginia Plan, which proposed a bicameral national legislature, and in the Connecticut Compromise, an agreement reached between delegates from small-population states and those from large-population states that in part defined the structure and representation that each state would have in the new Congress.

Indiana's 1st congressional district

Indiana's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Indiana. The district is based in Gary and its surrounding suburbs and exurbs. It consists of all of Lake and Porter counties and most of western LaPorte County in the northwestern part of the state. Redistricting passed by the Indiana General Assembly in 2011 shifted the district's boundaries, effective January 2013, to include all of Lake and Porter counties and the western and northwestern townships of LaPorte County, while moving Benton, Jasper and Newton counties out of the district.

The district is currently represented by Democrat Pete Visclosky.

The district's character is very different from the rest of Indiana. It includes almost all of the Indiana side of the Chicago metropolitan area. While Porter and LaPorte counties are swing counties, Lake County is heavily Democratic. Lake County contains more than 70 percent of the district's population and has more people than the rest of the district combined, which is enough to make the 1st a relatively safe Democratic seat. The district has not elected a Republican to Congress in 90 years, making it one of the most Democratic districts in the nation. Among Indiana's congressional districts, only the Indianapolis-based 7th District is more Democratic.

Iron triangle (US politics)

In United States politics, the "iron triangle" comprises the policy-making relationship among the congressional committees, the bureaucracy, and interest groups, as described in 1981 by Gordon Adams. Earlier mentions of this ‘iron triangle’ concept are in a 1956 Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report as, “Iron triangle: Clout, background, and outlook” and “Chinks in the Iron Triangle?”

Joan Biskupic

Joan Biskupic (Croatian: Biskupić) (born c. 1956) is an American journalist, author, and lawyer who has covered the United States Supreme Court since 1989. She is a full time Supreme Court analyst at CNN. She was previously Editor in Charge, Legal Affairs for Reuters from 2012 to 2016. For the 2016–17 academic year, she was a visiting professor at the University of California, Irvine's School of Law. From 2000-12 she was the Legal Affairs Correspondent for USA Today.From 1992 to 2000, she was the Supreme Court reporter for The Washington Post, and from 1989 to 1992 she was a legal affairs writer for Congressional Quarterly. Her work was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Explanatory Reporting in 2015. She was awarded the 1991 Everett McKinley Dirksen Award for Distinguished Reporting on Congress for her coverage of the Clarence Thomas hearings for Congressional Quarterly. Prior to that, she covered government and politics for the Milwaukee Journal and the Tulsa Tribune.Biskupic has written a number of books on the Supreme Court, including biographies of Supreme Court Justices Sandra Day O'Connor, Antonin Scalia, and Sonia Sotomayor. She was awarded three residential fellowships at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, in 2003, 2004 and 2008, for work on these biographies. She is also a commentator who appears regularly on television and radio programs. She is a regular panelist on Washington Week and has appeared on Diane Rehm Show, The Today Show, Good Morning America, Nightline and Face the Nation.

Morgan Quitno Press

Morgan Quitno Press is a research and publishing company based in Lawrence, Kansas, which compiles books with statistics of crime rates, health care, education, and other categories, ranking cities and states in the United States. Among the major categories are "Smartest State", "Most Dangerous State", "Most Dangerous City", "Most Dangerous Metro Area", "Most Livable State", "Healthiest State", and "Most Improved State"; some information is per capita while some is overall. In July 2007 Morgan Quitno was acquired by CQ Press, a division of Congressional Quarterly Inc.. Their ranking of jurisdictions in terms of "safety" has been criticized for faulty methodology and inappropriate use of data by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the American Society of Criminology, and the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

Nelson Poynter

Nelson Poynter (1903–1978) was an American publisher and media proprietor. He was the owner of the Times Publishing Company, and the co-founder of the Congressional Quarterly. He is the namesake of the Poynter Institute.

Richard Neal

Richard Edmund Neal (born February 14, 1949) is an American politician serving as the U.S. Representative for Massachusetts's 1st congressional district. He is a member of the Democratic Party and a former city councilor and mayor of Springfield, Massachusetts. He is the dean of the Massachusetts delegation to the House of Representatives.

A Worcester, Massachusetts native, Neal graduated from American International College and received a master's degree from the University of Hartford. After graduating he became involved in politics, working as an assistant to the mayor of Springfield. He served as president of the Springfield City Council from 1979 to 1983 while teaching high school history courses and lecturing at local colleges. He served as mayor of Springfield from 1983 to 1989, overseeing a period of economic growth. With his political influence and a head start on contributions, he was nearly unopposed when he ran for the House of Representatives in 1988.

As a member of the House Ways and Means Committee and former chairman of the Subcommittee on Select Revenue Measures, Neal is an influential figure in House economic policy. He has also dedicated much of his career to US–Ireland relations and maintaining American involvement in the Northern Ireland peace process, for which he has won several acclamations. He has a generally liberal voting record, but is considered a moderate on such issues as abortion and trade.

Roll Call

Roll Call is a newspaper and website published in Washington, D.C., United States, when the United States Congress is in session. Roll Call reports news of legislative and political maneuverings on Capitol Hill, as well as political coverage of congressional elections across the country. In addition to breaking news, the paper features analysts such as Kate Ackley, Niels Lesniewski, Stuart Rothenberg, and Nathan L. Gonzales.

Roll Call has an online version as well, publishing in-depth features, breaking news stories, infographics, award-winning photojournalism, original video series, and over a dozen email newsletters.

In 2017, Roll Call's regular columnists are Walter Shapiro, Jonathan Allen, Mary Curtis, and Patricia Murphy.

Roll Call was founded in 1955 by Sid Yudain, who was working as a press secretary to Congressman Al Morano (R-Conn.) at the time. Yudain published the inaugural issue on June 16, 1955, with an initial printing of 10,000 copies. In 1986, Yudain sold Roll Call to Arthur Levitt, who was serving as the chairman of the American Stock Exchange at the time of the sale. Yudain continued to work as a columnist at Roll Call after the sale. The Economist Group acquired Roll Call in 1993.Today, Roll Call is the flagship publication of CQ Roll Call, which also operates: CQ (formerly Congressional Quarterly), publisher of a subscriber-based service for daily and weekly news about Congress and politics, as well as a weekly magazine. Roll Call merged with CQ in 2009 after the latter company was purchased by The Economist Group, Roll Call's parent company. in July 2018, a deal was announced for CQ Roll Call to be acquired by FiscalNote.Every issue of Roll Call is delivered to Congress and to the White House free of charge.

Senate Republican Policy Committee

The Senate Republican Policy Committee is the policy research arm of the Republican Conference. Its predecessor, the Senate Republican Steering Committee was formed in March 1944 after Leader Charles L. McNary's death. It became formally funded and renamed the Policy Committee in 1947 along with its Democratic counterpart, the Senate Democratic Policy Committee, after the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946.

Its leader, the Policy Committee chairman, is the fourth-ranking Republican in the Senate, behind the Republican Leader, the Republican Whip, and the Republican Conference Chairman.

According to Congressional Quarterly, "the Policy Committee is in effect a legislative think tank. The committee organizes the prominent Tuesday lunches with summaries of major bills, analysis of roll call votes and distribution of issue papers."

Thomas N. Schroth

Thomas Nolan Schroth (December 21, 1920 – July 23, 2009) was an American journalist who specialized in coverage of inside the Beltway politics as editor of Congressional Quarterly starting in 1955 and then establishing The National Journal in 1969 after he was fired from CQ due to policy conflicts.

United States House of Representatives

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber. Together they comprise the legislature of the United States.

The composition of the House is established by Article One of the United States Constitution. The House is composed of Representatives who sit in congressional districts that are allocated to each of the 50 states on a basis of population as measured by the U.S. Census, with each district entitled to one representative. Since its inception in 1789, all Representatives have been directly elected. The total number of voting representatives is fixed by law at 435. As of the 2010 Census, the largest delegation is that of California, with fifty-three representatives. Seven states have only one representative: Alaska, Delaware, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont, and Wyoming.The House is charged with the passage of federal legislation, known as bills, which, after concurrence by the Senate, are sent to the President for consideration. In addition to this basic power, the House has certain exclusive powers, among them the power to initiate all bills related to revenue; the impeachment of federal officers, who are sent to trial before the Senate; and, in cases wherein no candidate receives a majority of electors for President, the duty falls upon the House to elect one of the top three recipients of electors for that office, with one vote given to each state for that purpose. The House meets in the south wing of the United States Capitol.

The presiding officer is the Speaker of the House, who is elected by the members thereof (and is therefore traditionally the leader of the controlling party). The Speaker and other floor leaders are chosen by the Democratic Caucus or the Republican Conference, depending on whichever party has more voting members.

United States Senate

The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the United States House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The Senate chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol, in Washington, D.C.

The composition and powers of the Senate are established by Article One of the United States Constitution. The Senate is composed of senators, each of whom represents a single state in its entirety. Each state, regardless of its population size, is equally represented by two senators who serve staggered terms of six years. There being at present 50 states in the Union, there are presently 100 senators. From 1789 until 1913, senators were appointed by legislatures of the states they represented; they are now elected by popular vote, following the ratification of the Seventeenth Amendment in 1913.

As the upper chamber of Congress, the Senate has several powers of advice and consent which are unique to it. These include the approval of treaties, and the confirmation of Cabinet secretaries, Supreme Court justices, federal judges, flag officers, regulatory officials, ambassadors, other federal executive officials and other federal uniformed officers. In addition to these, in cases wherein no candidate receives a majority of electors for Vice President, the duty falls to the Senate to elect one of the top two recipients of electors for that office. Furthermore, the Senate has the responsibility of conducting the trials of those impeached by the House.

The Senate is widely considered both a more deliberative and more prestigious body than the House of Representatives due to its longer terms, smaller size, and statewide constituencies, which historically led to a more collegial and less partisan atmosphere. The presiding officer of the Senate is the Vice President of the United States, who is President of the Senate. In the Vice President's absence, the President Pro Tempore, who is customarily the senior member of the party holding a majority of seats, presides over the Senate. In the early 20th century, the practice of majority and minority parties electing their floor leaders began, although they are not constitutional officers.

Publications
Subsidiaries and divisions
People
Other

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.