Confederation of African Football

The Confederation of African Football or CAF (French: Confédération Africaine de Football) is the administrative and controlling body for African association football.

CAF represents the national football associations of Africa, runs continental, national, and club competitions, and controls the prize money, regulations and media rights to those competitions.

CAF is the biggest of the six continental confederations of FIFA. Since the expansion of the number of teams at the World Cup finals to 32 in 1998, CAF has been allocated five places, though this was expanded to six for the 2010 tournament in South Africa, to include the hosts.

CAF was established on 8 February 1957 in Khartoum, Sudan,[1] by Egyptian, Ethiopian, South African and Sudanese[2] FAs, following former discussions between the Egyptian, Somali, South African and Sudanese FAs earlier on 7 June 1956 at the Avenida Hotel in Lisbon, Portugal. Its first headquarters was situated in Khartoum for some months until a fire outbreak in the offices of the Sudanese Football Association when the organization moved near Cairo, Egypt. Youssef Mohamad was the first general secretary and Abdel Aziz Abdallah Salem the president. Since 2002, the administrative center has been located in 6th of October City, Cairo, Egypt. CAF currently has 56 member associations: 54 are full members, while Zanzibar and Réunion are associate members (see the CAF Members and Zones section below).

The current CAF President is Ahmad Ahmad from Madagascar, who was elected on 16 March 2017.[3] The 1st Vice-President is Amaju Melvin Pinnick from Nigeria, the 2nd Vice-President is called Constant Omari Selemani from RD Congo and the 3rd Vice-President is Fouzi Lekjaa from Morocco.[4] Current CAF General Secretary is Egyptian Amr Fahmy since 16 November 2017.[5]

Confederation of African Football
Confederation of African Football logo
Confederation of African Football member associations map
AbbreviationCAF
Formation10 February 1957
TypeSports organisation
Headquarters6th of October City, Cairo, Egypt
Region served
Africa (CAF)
Membership
56 member associations
Official language
English, French, Arabic
Secretary General
Amr Fahmy
Ahmad Ahmad
Parent organization
FIFA
Websitewww.cafonline.com

Current leaders

Name Position
Madagascar Ahmad Ahmad President
Nigeria Amaju Pinnick Vice President
Democratic Republic of the Congo Constant Omari Vice President
Morocco Fouzi Lekjaa Vice President
Morocco Mouad Hajji General Secretary
Egypt Essameldin Agha Acting General Secretary
Egypt Mohamed El Sherei Treasurer
Cameroon Junior Binyam Media and Communication Manager

Source: [6][7]

CAF members and zones

Members

African regional federations
Other federation
Code Association National teams Founded FIFA affiliation CAF affiliation Regional affiliation IOC member
Union of North African Football Federations (UNAF)
ALG  Algeria 1962 1963 1964 2005 Yes
EGY  Egypt 2 1921 1923 1957 2005 Yes
LBY  Libya 1962 1964 1965 2005 Yes
MAR  Morocco 1955 1960 1959 2005 Yes
TUN  Tunisia 1957 1960 1960 2005 Yes
West African Football Union (WAFU-UFOA)
BEN  Benin 1962 1962 1962 1975 Yes
BFA  Burkina Faso 1960 1964 1964 1975 Yes
CPV  Cape Verde 1982 1986 2000 1975 Yes
GAM  Gambia 1952 1968 1966 1975 Yes
GHA  Ghana 1957 1958 1958 1975 Yes
GUI  Guinea 1960 1962 1963 1975 Yes
GNB  Guinea-Bissau 1974 1986 1986 1975 Yes
CIV  Ivory Coast 1960 1964 1960 1975 Yes
LBR  Liberia 1936 1964 1962 1975 Yes
MLI  Mali 1960 1963 1963 1975 Yes
MTN  Mauritania 1961 1970 1968 1975 Yes
NIG  Niger 1962 1967 1967 1975 Yes
NGA  Nigeria 1945 1960 1960 1975 Yes
SEN  Senegal 1960 1964 1964 1975 Yes
SLE  Sierra Leone 1960 1960 1960 1975 Yes
TOG  Togo 1960 1962 1964 1975 Yes
Central African Football Federations' Union (UNIFFAC)
CMR  Cameroon 1959 1962 1963 1978 Yes
CTA  Central African Republic 1961 1964 1965 1978 Yes
CHA  Chad 1962 1964 1964 1978 Yes
CGO  Congo 1962 1964 1966 1978 Yes
COD  DR Congo 1919 1964 1964 1978 Yes
EQG  Equatorial Guinea 1957 1986 1986 1978 Yes
GAB  Gabon 1962 1966 1967 1978 Yes
STP  São Tomé and Príncipe 1975 1986 1986 1978 Yes
Council for East and Central Africa Football Associations (CECAFA)
BDI  Burundi 1948 1972 1972 1994 Yes
DJI  Djibouti 1979 1994 1994 1995 Yes
ERI  Eritrea 1996 1998 1998 1973 Yes
ETH  Ethiopia 1943 1952 1957 1994 Yes
KEN  Kenya 1960 1960 1968 1973 Yes
RWA  Rwanda 1972 1978 1978 1994 Yes
SOM  Somalia 1951 1962 1968 1973 Yes
SSD  South Sudan 2011 2012 2012 2012 Yes
SDN  Sudan 1936 1948 1957 1975 Yes
TAN  Tanzania 1930 1964 1964 1973 Yes
UGA  Uganda 1924 1960 1960 1973 Yes
ZAN  Zanzibar 3 1965 1980 1973 & 2003 No
Council of Southern Africa Football Associations (COSAFA)
ANG  Angola 1979 1980 1980 1997 Yes
BOT  Botswana 1970 1978 1976 1997 Yes
COM  Comoros 1979 2005 2005 2007 Yes
SWZ  Eswatini 1968 1978 1978 1997 Yes
LES  Lesotho 1932 1964 1964 1997 Yes
MAD  Madagascar 1961 1964 1963 2000 Yes
MWI  Malawi 1966 1968 1968 1997 Yes
MRI  Mauritius 1952 1964 1963 2000 Yes
MOZ  Mozambique 1976 1980 1980 1997 Yes
NAM  Namibia 1990 1992 1992 1997 Yes
SEY  Seychelles 1979 1986 1986 2000 Yes
RSA  South Africa 1 1991 1992 1992 1997 Yes
ZAM  Zambia 1929 1964 1964 1997 Yes
ZIM  Zimbabwe 1965 1965 1980 1997 Yes
Non-regional members
REU  Réunion 3 1926 2004 No
  1. ^ – Excluded from CAF and from 1st African Cup of Nations in 1957 due to Apartheid
  2. ^ – Member of UNAF from 2005 to 2009 and from 2011 – Withdrew from UNAF on 19 November 2009 but return on 2011
  3. ^ – Associate members, not part of FIFA. Zanzibar held full membership for four months in 2017, when its status was changed after CAF admitted its membership was an error.[8]

Regional zones

CAF Zone 1 – North Zone

CAF Zone 2 – Zone West A

CAF Zone 3 – Zone West B

CAF Zone 4 – Central Zone

CAF Zone 5 – Central-East Zone

CAF Zone 6 – Southern Zone

Competitions

International

The main competition for men's national teams is the Africa Cup of Nations, started in 1957. In 2009, the CAF started organising another competition for men's national teams, the African Nations Championship composed exclusively of national players playing in the national championship. CAF also runs national competitions at Under-20 and Under-17 levels. For women's national teams, CAF operates the Africa Women Cup of Nations for senior national sides and the African U-20 Cup of Nations for Women at under-20 level, since 2008 there is an African U-17 Cup of Nations for Women for under-17 sides.

Club

CAF also runs the two main club competitions in Africa: the CAF Champions League was first held in 1964, and was known as the African Cup of Champions Clubs (or just African Cup) until 1997; and the CAF Confederation Cup, for national cup winners and high-placed league teams, was launched by CAF in 2004 as a successor to the African Cup Winners' Cup (begun in 1975). A third competition, the CAF Cup, started in 1992 and was absorbed into the CAF Confederation Cup in 2004.[9]

The CAF Super Cup, which pits the winners of the Champions League against the winners of the CAF Confederation Cup (previously the winners of the Cup Winners' Cup), came into being in 1992.

The Afro-Asian Club Championship was jointly organised with AFC between the winners of the CAF Champions League and the winners of the AFC Champions League. The last Afro-Asian Club Championship took place in 1998.

Current title holders

Competition Champion Title Runner-up Next edition
Clubs
CAF Champions League Tunisia Espérance de Tunis 3rd Egypt Al-Ahly 2018–19
CAF Confederation Cup Egypt Zamalek 1st Morocco RS Berkane 2019–20
CAF Super Cup Morocco Raja Casablanca 2nd Tunisia Espérance de Tunis 2019
Nations men
Africa Cup of Nations  Cameroon 5th  Egypt 2019
African Nations Championship  Morocco 1st  Nigeria 2020
Africa U-23 Cup of Nations  Nigeria 1st  Algeria 2019
Africa U-20 Cup of Nations[cc 1]  Mali 1st  Senegal 2021
Africa U-17 Cup of Nations[cc 2]  Cameroon 2nd  Ghana 2021
Africa Futsal Cup of Nations  Morocco 1st  Egypt 2020
Africa Beach Soccer Cup of Nations  Senegal 5th  Nigeria 2020
Football at the African Games  Senegal 1st  Burkina Faso 2019
Nations women
Africa Women Cup of Nations  Nigeria 11th  South Africa 2020
African U-20 Cup of Nations for Women  Ghana
 Nigeria
5th
9th
 Cameroon
 South Africa
2020
African U-17 Cup of Nations for Women  Ghana
 South Africa
 Cameroon
5th
2nd
1st
 Djibouti
 Morocco
 Nigeria
2020
Football at the African Games  Ghana 1st  Cameroon 2019
  1. ^ This competition has been known by four different names, most recently the African U-21 Championship from 2003 through the 2015 competition. The first tournament under the current name of "Africa U-20 Cup of Nations" will tale place in 2017.
  2. ^ From 1995 through the 2015 tournament, the competition was known as the African U-17 Championship. The first tournament under the current name of "Africa U-17 Cup of Nations" will tale place in 2017.

CAF competitions

Clubs:

Defunct

National teams:

Inter Continental:

Defunct

Regional:

Sponsors

In October 2004, MTN has contracted a four-year deal to sponsor African football's major competitions. This agreement, which worthed US$12.5 million, was the biggest sponsorship deal in African sporting history at that time.[10]

In July 2009, Orange has signed an eight-year deal to sponsor African football's major competitions. Terms of the deal were not disclosed but CAF previous year put a value of €100 million for a comprehensive and long-term package of its competitions when it opened tenders for a new sponsor. The deal included the African Nations Cup, the CAF Champions League, the CAF Confederation Cup, the CAF Super Cup, the African Nations Championship and the African Youth Championship.[11]

In July 2016, Total replaced Orange as the main sponsor and has secured an eight-year sponsorship package from the Confederation of African Football (CAF) for a value of €950 million[12] to support ten of its principal competitions, including the CAF Champions League, renamed Total CAF Champions League.[13]

The CAF current main sponsors are:

World Cup participation

Legend
  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place
  • 4th – Fourth place
  • QF – Quarterfinals (1934–1938, 1954–1970, and 1986–present: knockout round of 8)
  • R2 — Round 2 (1974–1978, second group stage, top 8; 1982: second group stage, top 12; 1986–present: knockout round of 16)
  • R1 — Round 1
  • q — Qualified for upcoming tournament
  •  ••  – Qualified but withdrew
  •  •  – Did not qualify
  •  ×  – Did not enter / Withdrew / Banned
  •    – Hosts
  •     – Not affiliated in FIFA

FIFA World Cup

For each tournament, the number of teams in each finals tournament (in brackets) are shown.

Team 1930
Uruguay
(13)
1934
Italy
(16)
1938
France
(15)
1950
Brazil
(13)
1954
Switzerland
(16)
1958
Sweden
(16)
1962
Chile
(16)
1966
England
(16)
1970
Mexico
(16)
1974
West Germany
(16)
1978
Argentina
(16)
1982
Spain
(24)
1986
Mexico
(24)
1990
Italy
(24)
1994
United States
(24)
1998
France
(32)
2002
South Korea
Japan
(32)
2006
Germany
(32)
2010
South Africa
(32)
2014
Brazil
(32)
2018
Russia
(32)
2022
Qatar
(32)
2026
Canada
Mexico
United States
(48)
Total
 Algeria Part of France[14] × R1
13th
R1
22nd
R1
28th
R2
14th
4/13
 Angola Part of Portugal[15] × R1
23rd
1/9
 Cameroon Part of France × × R1
17th
QF
7th
R1
22nd
R1
25th
R1
20th
R1
31st
R1
32nd
7/13
 DR Congo[16] Part of Belgium[17] × × R1
16th
× 1/11
 Egypt × R1
13th
× × × × × × R1
20th
R1
31st
3/14
 Ghana Part of the United Kingdom × × × R2
13th
QF
7th
R1
25th
3/13
 Ivory Coast Part of France × × × × R1
19th
R1
17th
R1
21st
3/11
 Morocco Part of France × R1
14th
R2
11th
R1
23rd
R1
18th
R1
27th
5/14
 Nigeria Part of the United Kingdom × R2
9th
R2
12th
R1
27th
R1
27th
R2
16th
R1
21st
6/14
 Senegal Part of France × × × QF
7th
R1
17th
2/11
 South Africa × × × × × × × × × × R1
24th
R1
17th
R1
20th
3/7
 Togo Part of France × × × × × R1
30th
1/10
 Tunisia Part of France × R1
9th
R1
26th
R1
29th
R1
24th
R1
24th
5/14
Total 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 5 5 5 6 5 5 5 44
Firsts
  • 1934:  Egypt first African team to qualify for the World Cup
  • 1970:  Morocco first African team to draw a match in the World Cup
  • 1978:  Tunisia first African team to win a match in the World Cup
  • 1982:  Algeria first African team to win two matches in the World Cup
  • 1986:  Algeria first African team to qualify two consecutive World Cups
  • 1986:  Morocco first African team to reach the knockout stage (round of sixteen)
  • 1990:  Cameroon first African team to reach the knockout stage (quarter-finals)
  • 1994 and 1998:  Nigeria first African team to win and reach the knockout stage (round of sixteen) in two consecutive World Cups
  • 2002:  Senegal first African team to reach the knockout stage (quarter-finals) further on the World Cup debut
  • 2010:  South Africa first African team to host the World Cup
  • 2014:  Algeria &  Nigeria first African teams to reach the knockout stage (round of sixteen) simultaneously in the World Cup

FIFA Women's World Cup

The following CAF members have competed in the following FIFA Women's World Cups. Teams are sorted by number of appearances.

Team 1991
China
(12)
1995
Sweden
(12)
1999
United States
(16)
2003
United States
(16)
2007
China
(16)
2011
Germany
(16)
2015
Canada
(24)
2019
France
(24)
2023

(24)
Total
 Cameroon × R2
11th
R2
15th
2/7
 Ivory Coast × × × R1
23rd
1/5
 Equatorial Guinea × × × R1
15th
× 1/4
 Ghana R1
13–14
R1
12th
R1
15th
3/8
 Nigeria R1
10th
R1
11th
QF
7th
R1
15th
R1
13th
R1
9th
R1
21st
R2
16th
8/8
 South Africa × R1
22nd
1/7

Other international tournaments

Legend
  • 1st – Champions
  • 2nd – Runners-up
  • 3rd – Third place
  • 4th – Fourth place
  • GS – Group stage
  • Q – Qualified for upcoming tournament
  •  ••  – Qualified but withdrew
  •  •  – Did not qualify
  •  ×  – Did not enter / Withdrew from the Africa Cup of Nations or withdrew from the Confederations Cup / Banned
  •    – Hosts

FIFA Confederations Cup

Team 1992
Saudi Arabia
1995
Saudi Arabia
1997
Saudi Arabia
1999
Mexico
2001
South Korea
Japan
2003
France
2005
Germany
2009
South Africa
2013
Brazil
2017
Russia
2021
Total
 Cameroon GS 2nd GS 3
 Egypt GS GS 2
 South Africa × GS 4th 2
 Nigeria 4th × × GS 2
 Ivory Coast 4th 1
 Tunisia GS 1
Total 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 11

FIFA Futsal World Cup

Nation 1989
Netherlands
1992
Hong Kong
1996
Spain
2000
Guatemala
2004
Chinese Taipei
2008
Brazil
2012
Thailand
2016
Colombia
2020
Lithuania
Years
 Algeria R1 1
 Egypt R1 R2 R1 R1 R2 QF 6
 Libya R1 R1 2
 Morocco R1 R1 2
 Mozambique R1 1
 Nigeria R1 1
 Zimbabwe R1 1
Nations 2 1 1 1 1 2 3 3

FIFA Beach Soccer World Cup

1995
Brazil
(8)
1996
Brazil
(8)
1997
Brazil
(8)
1998
Brazil
(10)
1999
Brazil
(12)
2000
Brazil
(12)
2001
Brazil
(12)
2002
Brazil
(8)
2003
Brazil
(8)
2004
Brazil
(12)
2005
Brazil
(12)
2006
Brazil
(12)
2007
Brazil
(16)
2008
France
(16)
2009
United Arab Emirates
(16)
2011
Italy
(16)
2013
French Polynesia
(16)
2015
Portugal
(16)
2017
The Bahamas
(16)
2019
Paraguay
(16)
Total Participations
 Cameroon R1
14th
R1
16th
2/20
 Ivory Coast R1
11th
R1
16th
2/20
 Madagascar R1
14th
1/20
 Nigeria R1
9th
QF
6th
R1
12th
QF
6th
R1
12th
Q 6/20
 Senegal QF
5th
R1
9th
QF
7th
R1
13th
R1
13th
QF
6th
Q 7/20
 South Africa R1
12th
R1
12th
2/20
Total 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 1 0 0 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 2

Summer Olympics

Numbers refer to the final placing of each team at the respective Games.

Men

Nation France
00
United States
04
United Kingdom
08
Sweden
12
Belgium
20
France
24
Netherlands
28
Germany
36
United Kingdom
48
Finland
52
Australia
56
Italy
60
Japan
64
Mexico
68
West Germany
72
Canada
76
Soviet Union
80
United States
84
South Korea
88
Spain
92
United States
96
Australia
00
Greece
04
China
08
United Kingdom
12
Brazil
16
Japan
20
Years
 Algeria Part of France 8 14 2
 Cameroon Part of France 11 1 8 3
 Egypt[18] 8 8 4 =9 =11 =9 12 4 8 12 8 11
 Ivory Coast Part of France 6 1
 Gabon Part of France 12 1
 Ghana Part of the United Kingdom 7 12 16 3 8 9 6
 Guinea Part of France 11 1
 Mali Part of France 5 1
 Morocco Part of France 13 8 12 15 16 =10 11 7
 Nigeria Part of the United Kingdom 14 13 15 1 8 2 3 7
 Senegal Part of France 6 - 1
 South Africa Banned because of apartheid 11 13 2
 Sudan Part of the United Kingdom 15 1
 Tunisia Part of France 15 13 14 12 4
 Zambia Part of the United Kingdom RHO 15 5 2
Total nations 3 2 5 11 14 22 17 16 18 25 11 16 14 16 16 13 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16

Women

Nation United States
96
Australia
00
Greece
04
China
08
United Kingdom
12
Brazil
16
Japan
20
Years
 Cameroon 12 1
 Nigeria 8 6 11 3
 South Africa 10 10 2
 Zimbabwe 12 1
Total nations 8 8 10 12 12 12 12

Rankings

This graph shows the time periods each (male) national football team has been at the highest ranked CAF member on the FIFA World Rankings.

Men's national teams

Rankings are calculated by FIFA.[19]

CAF FIFA Country Point +/− Region
1 22  Senegal 1515 Increase +1 WAFU
2 25  Tunisia 1501 Increase +3 UNAF
3 45  Nigeria 1433 Decrease -3 WAFU
4 47  Morocco 1429 Decrease -2 UNAF
5 49  DR Congo 1424 Decrease -3 UNIFFAC
6 50  Ghana 1423 Decrease -1 WAFU
7 51  Cameroon 1404 Increase +3 UNIFFAC
8 58  Egypt 1384 Decrease -1 UNAF
9 59  Burkina Faso 1381 Decrease -1 WAFU
10 62  Mali 1365 Increase +3 WAFU
10 62  Ivory Coast 1365 Increase +3 WAFU
12 68  Algeria 1346 Increase +2 UNAF
13 71  Guinea 1336 Decrease -3 WAFU
14 72  South Africa 1335 Increase +1 COSAFA
15 76  Cape Verde 1319 Steady WAFU
16 80  Uganda 1299 Decrease -1 CECAFA
17 81  Zambia 1298 Decrease -2 COSAFA
18 88  Benin 1273 Increase +3 WAFU
19 89  Gabon 1272 Increase +1 UNIFFAC
20 90  Congo 1265 Increase +2 UNIFFAC
21 103  Mauritania 1210 Steady WAFU
22 104  Niger 1209 Steady WAFU
23 105  Kenya 1207 Increase +3 CECAFA
23 105  Libya 1207 Steady UNAF
25 108  Madagascar 1198 Decrease -1 COSAFA
26 109  Zimbabwe 1192 Increase +1 COSAFA
27 112  Central African Republic 1184 Steady UNIFFAC
28 113  Namibia 1182 Steady COSAFA
29 115  Sierra Leone 1172 Steady WAFU
30 117  Mozambique 1163 Steady COSAFA
31 118  Guinea-Bissau 1158 Steady WAFU
32 123  Angola 1142 Decrease -1 COSAFA
33 126  Malawi 1131 Increase +2 COSAFA
34 128  Togo 1127 Decrease -2 WAFU
35 130  Sudan 1106 Steady CECAFA
36 131  Tanzania 1105 Steady CECAFA
37 134  Burundi 1092 Increase +2 CECAFA
38 136  Rwanda 1088 Increase +2 CECAFA
39 141  Equatorial Guinea 1074 Increase +2 UNIFFAC
39 141  Eswatini 1074 Increase +2 COSAFA
41 145  Lesotho 1072 Decrease -2 COSAFA
42 147  Botswana 1069 Increase +1 COSAFA
43 148  Comoros 1068 Decrease -1 COSAFA
44 150  Ethiopia 1049 Steady CECAFA
45 153  Liberia 1044 Steady WAFU
46 157  Mauritius 1020 Decrease -1 COSAFA
47 161  Gambia 1002 Increase +2 WAFU
48 168  South Sudan 989 Decrease -1 CECAFA
49 176  Chad 956 Increase +1 UNIFFAC
50 185  São Tomé and Príncipe 920 Steady UNIFFAC
51 194  Seychelles 902 Decrease -4 COSAFA
52 195  Djibouti 896 Increase +2 CECAFA
53 202  Eritrea 868 Increase +1 CECAFA
53 202  Somalia 868 Increase +1 CECAFA

Last updated 14 June 2019

Women's national teams

Rankings are calculated by FIFA.[20]

As of 28 September 2018
CAF FIFA Country Point +/−
1 38  Nigeria 1607 Steady
2 47  Ghana 1503 Decrease -1
3 49  Cameroon 1478 Decrease -1
4 50  South Africa 1446 Increase +1
5 54  Equatorial Guinea 1421 Increase +1
6 69  Ivory Coast 1363 Decrease -1
7 78  Morocco 1304 Steady
8 80  Algeria 1294 Decrease -1
9 85  Senegal 1245 Decrease -3
10 89  Mali 1232 Decrease -3
11 96  Congo 1196 Decrease -2
12 97  Zimbabwe 1192 Decrease -4
13 111  Ethiopia 1117 Decrease -8
14 114  Burkina Faso 1062 Decrease -7
15 116  Zambia 1053 Decrease -8
16 120  Namibia 1006 Decrease -9
17 125  Tanzania 976 Decrease -7
18 129  Kenya 914 Decrease -6
19 131  Rwanda 896 Increase +10
20 135  Uganda 873 Decrease -4
21 137  Mozambique 867 Decrease -9
22 138  Lesotho 850 Decrease -9
23 139  Malawi 837 Decrease -9
24 140  Swaziland 804 Decrease -8
25 142  Botswana 755 Decrease -5
26 146  Madagascar 693 Decrease -7
27 147  Mauritius 358 Decrease -7
28 **  Tunisia 1313 Decrease -7
29 **  Egypt 1256 Decrease -7
30 *  Gambia 1183 Decrease -7
31 *  Angola 1134 Decrease -7
32 **  Sierra Leone 1132 Decrease -7
33 **  DR Congo 1132 Decrease -7
34 **  Guinea 1077 Decrease -7
35 **  Eritrea 1060 Decrease -7
36 *  Central African Republic 1056 Decrease -7
37 **  Gabon 1052 Decrease -7
38 *  Togo 962 Decrease -7
39 **  Guinea-Bissau 927 Decrease -7
40 *  Niger 891 Decrease -7
41 **  Liberia 877 Decrease -7
42 *  Comoros 837 Decrease -7
43 *  Libya 761 Decrease -7
44 **  Burundi 519 Decrease -7
* Provisionally listed due to not having played more than five matches against officially ranked teams.
** Unranked teams are inactive for more than 18 months and therefore not ranked.

Beach soccer national teams

Rankings are calculated by Beach Soccer Worldwide (BSWW). Top ten, last updated 12 March 2018

CAF BSWW Country Points
1 12  Senegal 1084
2 17  Egypt 782
3 20  Nigeria 720
4 24  Morocco 609
5 34  Madagascar 339
6 41  Ivory Coast 330
7 57  Ghana 177
8 66  Libya 125
9 68  Mozambique 117
10 69  Cape Verde 115

CAF overall ranking of African clubs titles

The following clubs are the top 10 clubs in CAF competitions.

Pos Club Titles Trophies won
1 Egypt Al Ahly SC 20 8 African Cup of Champions Clubs/CAF Champions League, 1 CAF Confederation Cup, 4 African Cup Winners' Cup, 6 CAF Super Cup, 1 Afro-Asian Club Championship
2 Egypt Zamalek SC 12 5 African Cup of Champions Clubs/CAF Champions League, 1 CAF Confederation Cup, 1 African Cup Winners' Cup, 3 CAF Super Cup, 2 Afro-Asian Club Championship
3 Democratic Republic of the Congo TP Mazembe 11 5 African Cup of Champions Clubs/CAF Champions League, 2 CAF Confederation Cup, 1 African Cup Winners' Cup, 3 CAF Super Cup
4 Tunisia Étoile du Sahel 9 1 African Cup of Champions Clubs/CAF Champions League, 2 African Cup Winners' Cup, 2 CAF Confederation Cup, 2 CAF Cup, 2 CAF Super Cup
5 Morocco Raja Casablanca 8 3 African Cup of Champions Clubs/CAF Champions League, 1 CAF Confederation Cup, 1 CAF Cup, 2 CAF Super Cup, 1 Afro-Asian Club Championship
6 Tunisia ES Tunis 7 3 African Cup of Champions Clubs/CAF Champions League, 1 African Cup Winners' Cup, 1 CAF Cup, 1 CAF Super Cup, 1 Afro-Asian Club Championship
7 Algeria JS Kabylie 6 2 African Cup of Champions Clubs/CAF Champions League, 1 African Cup Winners' Cup, 3 CAF Cup
8 Morocco Wydad Casablanca 5 2 African Cup of Champions Clubs/CAF Champions League, 1 CAF Cup Winners' Cup, 1 CAF Super Cup, 1 Afro-Asian Club Championship
9 Algeria ES Sétif 4 2 African Cup of Champions Clubs/CAF Champions League, 1 CAF Super Cup, 1 Afro-Asian Club Championship
Cameroon Canon Yaoundé 4 3 African Cup of Champions Clubs/CAF Champions League, 1 African Cup Winners' Cup
Nigeria Enyimba F.C. 4 2 African Cup of Champions Clubs/CAF Champions League, 2 CAF Super Cup
Tunisia CS Sfaxien 4 3 CAF Confederation Cup, 1 CAF Cup

CAF overall ranking of African clubs

Rankings are calculated by the CAF based on points gathered by African teams throughout their participation in international club tournaments organized by either the FIFA, Harrison Campbell, or the CAF since the establishment of the first African Cup of Champions Clubs in 1964.[21]

Overall
Rank Club Points
1 Egypt Al Ahly SC 90
2 Tunisia Étoile du Sahel 60
3 Tunisia Espérance Tunis 59
4 Egypt Zamalek 56
5 Democratic Republic of the Congo TP Mazembe 49
6 Democratic Republic of the Congo Vita Club 44
7 Ivory Coast ASEC Mimosas 43
8 Algeria JS Kabylie 39
9 Cameroon Canon Yaoundé 36
10 Ghana Hearts of Oak 31
CAF Ranking of the 20th Century
Rank Club Points
1 Egypt Al-Ahly 40
2 Egypt El-Zamalek 37
3 Morocco Raja Casablanca 35
4 Ghana Asante Kotoko 34
4 Cameroon Canon Yaoundé 34
6 Tunisia Espérance Tunis 27
6 Ivory Coast ASEC Mimosas 27
8 Ghana Hearts of Oak 26
9 Ivory Coast Africa Sports 25
10 Algeria JS Kabylie 20
IFFHS Ranking of the 20th Century
Rank club Points
1 Ghana Asante Kotoko 149,00
2 Egypt Al Ahly SC 131,50
3 Egypt Zamalek 126,75
4 Cameroon Canon Yaoundé 125,50
5 Ivory Coast ASEC Mimosas 111,50
6 Ghana Hearts of Oak 104,00
7 Tunisia Espérance Tunis 98,00
8 Guinea Hafia FC 96,00
9 Ivory Coast Africa Sports 88,25
10 Democratic Republic of the Congo TP Mazembe 77,50

Men's Futsal

CAF FIFA Country Points +/-

Women's Futsal

CAF FIFA Country Points +/-

CAF Best Footballers of the Century

The voting to select the best of the century refers to three categories: male player, goalkeeper and female player and is obtained from five different steps. The resulting best players and goalkeepers were honored during the "World Football Gala 1999".[22]

CAF Best Player of the Century

Player Name Points
Liberia George Weah 95
Cameroon Roger Milla 77
Ghana Abédi Pelé 72
Algeria Lakhdar Belloumi 56
Algeria Rabah Madjer 51
Cameroon Théophile Abega 39
Ivory Coast Laurent Pokou 38
Zambia Kalusha Bwalya 37
Morocco Ahmed Faras 35
Nigeria Finidi George 32

CAF Best Goalkeeper of the Century

Player Name Points
Cameroon Joseph-Antoine Bell 39
Cameroon Thomas N'Kono 30
Tunisia Sadok Sassi "Attouga" 26
Morocco Badou Zaki 24
Democratic Republic of the Congo Mwamba Kazadi 19
Cameroon Jacques Songo'o 13
Zimbabwe Bruce Grobbelaar 11
Egypt Ahmed Shobair 10
Ivory Coast Alain Gouaméné 9
Nigeria Peter Rufai 6

CAF Best Women's Footballer of the Century

Player Name Points
Nigeria Uche Eucharia Ngozi 21
Ghana Nana Ama Gyamfuah 18
Nigeria Doris Nkiru Okosieme 17
Nigeria Florence Omagbemi 15
Nigeria Ann Chiejine 14
Nigeria Rita Nwadike 13
South Africa Fikhile Sitole 9
Ghana Vivian Mensah 8
Nigeria Mercy Akide 7
Nigeria Ann Agumanu

CAF Golden Jubilee Best Players poll

In 2007 CAF published the list of top 30 African players who played in the period from 1957 to 2007, as part of the celebration of CAF's 50th anniversary, ordered according to an online poll.[23]

01. Cameroon Roger Milla
02. Egypt Mahmoud El Khatib
03. Egypt Hossam Hassan
04. Cameroon Samuel Eto'o
05. Ghana Abedi Pele
06. Liberia George Weah
07. Ivory Coast Didier Drogba
08. Nigeria Nwankwo Kanu
09. Algeria Rabah Madjer
10. Zambia Kalusha Bwalya
11. Ghana Michael Essien
12. Nigeria Augustine Okocha
13. Egypt Saleh Selim
14. Algeria Hacène Lalmas
15. South Africa Benni McCarthy
16. Senegal El Hadji Diouf
17. Morocco Noureddine Naybet
18. Nigeria Rashidi Yekini
19. Egypt Hany Ramzy
20. Egypt Hassan Shehata
21. South Africa Lucas Radebe
22. Tunisia Tarak Dhiab
23. Morocco Mohammed Timoumi
24. Ghana Anthony Yeboah
25. Mali Salif Keita
26. Ghana Karim Abdul Razak
27. Ghana Samuel Kuffour
28. Algeria Lakhdar Belloumi
29. Cameroon Rigobert Song
30. Sudan Nasr El-Deen "Jaxa" Abbas

CAF's anthem

On 18 September 2007 the CAF launched a competition for all African composers to create its Anthem.[24] The CAF anthem is a musical composition, without lyrics, which and reflect the cultural patrimony and African music. The duration of the anthem is 74 seconds. The chosen anthem was first published to the site on 16 January 2008. The usage of the anthem and its composer are still unknown.

Announced 18 September 2007

CAF resolutions

Awards:

Qualifications:

See also

References

  1. ^ Historical Dictionary of Soccer. 2011. p. 21. ISBN 9780810873957.
  2. ^ International Sport Management. Human Kinetics. ISBN 9781450422413.
  3. ^ "Madagascar FA chief Ahmad elected as new Caf president". BBC News. 16 March 2017. Retrieved 16 March 2017.
  4. ^ Football, CAF – Confederation of African. "CAF – CAF – Organization – Bodies – Executive Committee". www.cafonline.com.
  5. ^ Football, CAF – Confederation of African. "CAF – News Center – News – NewsDetails". www.cafonline.com. Retrieved 29 November 2017.
  6. ^ FIFA (CAF)
  7. ^ CAF
  8. ^ Gleason, Mark. "Zanzibar loses Caf membership in embarrassing U-turn". BBC Sport. Retrieved 31 May 2018.
  9. ^ "Confederation Cup". CAF. Retrieved 17 December 2008.
  10. ^ "CAF signs sponsorship deal". BBC. BBC. 21 October 2004. Retrieved 14 February 2018.
  11. ^ "Orange signs deal to sponsor African soccer competitions". Reuters. Reuters. 28 July 2009. Retrieved 12 February 2018.
  12. ^ "CAF reviews prize money, AFCON 2017 winner to pocket $4 million". Africa News. Africa News. 9 November 2016. Retrieved 14 February 2018.
  13. ^ "Total to sponsor CAF competitions for the next eight years". Africa News. Africa News. 21 July 2016. Retrieved 21 July 2016.
  14. ^ Algeria gained independence in 1962, but they joined with other African nations to boycott the 1966 FIFA World Cup. Thus the 1970 FIFA World Cup qualification was their first participation.
  15. ^ Angola gained independence in 1975. Thus the 1986 FIFA World Cup qualification was their first participation.
  16. ^ The Democratic Republic of the Congo competed as Zaire in 1974.
  17. ^ Democratic Republic of the Congo gained independence in 1960, but they joined with other African nations to boycott the 1966 FIFA World Cup. Thus the 1974 FIFA World Cup qualification was their first participation.
  18. ^ Egypt team represented the United Arab Republic with Syria in 1960 finishing the 12th and alone in 1964 finishing the 4th.
  19. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking - Ranking Table - African Zone - FIFA.com". FIFA.com.
  20. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking (Women) – CAF Region". FIFA. 23 December 2011.
  21. ^ "African Club Ranking: Old-Time records from 2000 to 2010". CAF. 1 May 2014. Retrieved 1 November 2014.
  22. ^ "IFFHS History : Africa – Player of the Century (1900-1999)". IFFHS. 9 October 2017.
  23. ^ "CAF release 30 best African players in the last 50 years". CAF. 11 August 2007. Retrieved 15 January 2010.
  24. ^ "Competition for the CAF's anthem". CAF. 18 September 2007. Retrieved 13 November 2008.

External links

Africa U-23 Cup of Nations

The Total Africa U-23 Cup of Nations (known as the CAF U-23 Championship until 2015) is the main international football competition for CAF nations, played by under 23 years old players. It is held every four years with the top three teams qualifying automatically to the Olympic Games and the fourth-placed finisher playing in a play-off against a team from the Asian Football Confederation.

Africa Women Cup of Nations

The Total Africa Women Cup of Nations (known as the African Women's Championship until 2015) is an international women's football competition held every two years and sanctioned by the Confederation of African Football (CAF). It was first contested in 1991, but was not held biennially until 1998. Nigeria is the most successful nation in the tournament's history, having won a record 11 titles, meaning they have won all but two of the previous tournaments. Ghana hosted the tournament in 2018.The competition has served as a qualifying tournament for the FIFA Women's World Cup every other tournament since its inception in 1991.

African Cup Winners' Cup

The African Cup Winners' Cup was a football competition that started in 1975 and merged with the CAF Cup in 2004 to form the CAF Confederations Cup. It was a competition between the winning clubs of domestic cups in CAF-affiliated nations and was modelled after the UEFA Cup Winners' Cup.

Algerian Football Federation

The Algerian Football Federation (Arabic: الإتحادية الجزائرية لكرة القدم‎, French: Fédération algérienne de football) is the governing body of football in Algeria. It was formed in 1962 and was based in the capital Algiers. It has jurisdiction on the Algerian football league system and is in charge of the men's and women's national teams. Although an unofficial national team had played fixtures since 1958, the first recognized international took place in January 1963, some six months after independence.

Botswana Football Association

The Botswana Football Association (BFA) is the governing body of association football in Botswana, and controls the national football team. It is an affiliate of FIFA, CAF and the COSAFA.National football leagues include the beMOBILE Premier League, First Division North and First Division South.

CAF Champions League

The CAF Champions League is an annual continental club football competition run by the Confederation of African Football (CAF). The top club sides from Africa's football leagues are invited to participate in this competition, which is the premier club football competition in the continent and the equivalent to the UEFA Champions League. Due to sponsorship reasons, the official name is Total CAF Champions League, with Total Champions League also in use.The winner of the tournament earns a berth for the FIFA Club World Cup, a tournament contested between the champion clubs from all six continental confederations, and also faces the winner of the CAF Confederation Cup in the following season's CAF Super Cup.

Egypt's Al Ahly SC is the most successful club in the competition's history, having won the tournament eight times. Egyptian clubs have accumulated the highest number of victories, winning the title 14 times.

CAF Confederation Cup

The CAF Confederation Cup, officially named Total CAF Confederation Cup, is an annual club association football competition organised by the Confederation of African Football since 2004. Clubs qualify for the competition based on their performance in their national leagues and cup competitions. It is the second-tier competition of African club football, ranking below the CAF Champions League.

The winner of the tournament faces the winner of the CAF Champions League in the following season's CAF Super Cup.

CAF Nations League

The CAF Nations League is a proposed international association football competition, to be contested by the senior men's national teams of the member associations of the Confederation of African Football (CAF), the regional governing body of Africa. The tournament would take place on dates that are currently allocated for international friendlies on the FIFA International Match Calendar.

CAF Super Cup

The CAF Super Cup (also known as African Super Cup or for sponsorship reasons Total CAF Super Cup) is an annual African association football competition contested between the winners of the Total CAF Champions League and the Total CAF Confederation Cup. The competition was first held in 1993 and is organized by the Confederation of African Football (CAF). It is the continental equivalent of the UEFA Super Cup in European and Recopa Sudamericana in South American club football.

Cameroonian Football Federation

The Cameroonian Football Federation (French: Fédération Camerounaise de Football) is the governing body of football in Cameroon. It is known as FECAFOOT. The acting President of FECAFOOT is Seydou Mbombouo Njoya elected in December 2018

Egyptian Football Association

The Egyptian Football Association (EFA; Arabic: الإتحاد المصري لكرة القدم‎) is the governing body of football in Egypt. It was founded on 3 December 1921, joined FIFA in 1923, and CAF in 1957. It organises the football league, the Egyptian Premier League, the Egypt national football team and the Egypt women's national football team. It is based in Cairo.

Eritrean National Football Federation

The Eritrean National Football Federation (E.N.F.F.) (Tigrinya: ሃገራዊ ፈደረሽን ኩፅሶ እግሪ ኤርትራ) is the governing body of football in Eritrea.

Football Association of Zambia

The Football Association of Zambia (FAZ) is the governing body of football in Zambia. It was founded in 1929 and affiliated to FIFA in 1964. It is also a member of the Confederation of African Football and the Council of Southern Africa Football Associations. It organizes the Zambian Premier League and the national team.

The FAZ Secretariat known as Football House is located on Alick Nkhata Road in the capital Lusaka.

Gambia Football Federation

The Gambia Football Federation (GFF), formerly known as the Gambia Football Association, is the governing body of football in Gambia. It was founded in 1952, and affiliated to FIFA in 1968 and to CAF in 1966. It organizes the national football league and the national team.

Malian Football Federation

The Malian Football Federation (French: Fédération Malienne de Football, FMF) is the governing body of football in Mali. Founded in 1960, it joined the Confederation of African Football (African Soccer Confederation) in 1962 and has been affiliated with FIFA (International Soccer Federation) since 1964. Its first general secretary was Garan Fabou Kouyate. Famous leaders are Amadou Diakite and Tidiane Niambele.

The federation was suspended by FIFA on 17 March 2017.The federation bureau was dissolved in July 2005 due to Malian national soccer team's poor performance during the World Cup and the African Nations Cup qualifying of 2006.

The composition of the new bureau is as follows:

President: Boubacar Baba Diarra

Vice President: Boukary Sidibé

General Secretary: Yacouba Traoré

Treasurer: Seydou Sow

Media Officer: Salaha Baby

Jerseys: Green

Shorts: Yellow

Socks: Red

Futsal Coordinator: Abdou Maïga

Senegalese Football Federation

The Senegalese Football Federation (French: Fédération Sénégalaise de Football) (FSF) is the governing body of football in Senegal. It was founded in 1960, affiliated to FIFA in 1964 and to CAF in 1963. It organizes the national football league and the national team.

Seychelles Football Federation

The Seychelles Football Federation (SFF) is the governing body of football in the Seychelles. The current president is Elvis Chetty and it was founded in 1980, and affiliated to FIFA and to CAF in 1986. It organizes the Seychelles First Division and the national team.

Sudan Football Association

The Sudan Football Association (S.F.A.) (Arabic: الإتحاد السوداني لكرة القدم‎) is the governing body of football in Sudan. It was established in 1936 and affiliated with FIFA in 1948.

Along with the national associations of Egypt, Ethiopia and South Africa, the Sudan Football Association was one of the founding members of the Confederation of African Football (CAF) in 1957. The International Federation of Football Associations, FIFA, decided to suspend the activities of the Sudan Football Association (SFA) starting from Friday 30 June 2017. The suspension was lifted on Thursday 13 July 2017.

Union of North African Football Federations

The Union of North African Football Federations (UNAF; Arabic: اتحاد شمال إفريقيا لكرة القدم‎; French: Union nord-africaine de football) is an association football organising body. It was launched in 2005 by the North African members of the Confederation of African Football (CAF), Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia. The post of president will be rotated among the five founding nations.

CAF
Football codes
Confederations
Men's tournaments
Women's tournaments
Other tournaments
Presidents
General Secretaries
Awards
Rankings
Congresses
Corruption
Others
International football
Sports governing bodies in Africa
History
Geography
Politics
Economy
Society
By year

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.