Compton Bay

Compton Bay is a bay located on the southwest section of the Isle of Wight, England. Its north western edge is defined by the distinctive white chalk cliff of Freshwater Cliff, named after adjacent Freshwater Bay, which forms a small cove with the village of Freshwater situated just behind. Its north eastern edge is formed from the soft red and orange cretaceous rocks of Brook Bay, which are rapidly eroding.

Due to the lack of grazing on the cliffs above the bay, the native chalk ecosystem has thrived. Atop the cliffs, the Island's county flower, the pyramidal orchid, can be found, while the rare Glanville fritillary butterfly also lives in large numbers supported by the native flowers. There are also other hardy plants, such as common gorse bushes and wild cabbage.

The bay is popular with wave and kite surfers due to the waves that form when the prevailing south-westerly wind is blowing onshore. The beach is gently shelving and consists mostly of sand, with a few lengths of submerged rock, although at high tide the sea covers the beach almost completely. The car park and its public facilities are owned by the National Trust, as is the coastal strip of land. The Isle of Wight Coastal Path runs along the cliff around the bay.

There are dinosaur footprints visible in Compton Bay when the tide is low, and this is one of the best areas to see the dinosaurs of the Isle of Wight. Fossil hunters can often be seen searching for smaller fossils on the beach.

Compton Bay is located in Isle of Wight
Compton Bay
Compton Bay
Compton Bay on the Isle of Wight
Compton Bay, Isle of Wight, UK
The beach at Compton Bay, looking west
Compton Bay2
Compton Bay looking to the south east

Afton Down Obelisk

Atop Afton Down, roughly halfway between Brook and Freshwater Bay, a small obelisk can be found overlooking the bay. It is inscribed with a memorial to a resident of one of the nearby villages who fell from the cliff to his death in 1846. This obelisk was Grade II listed in 1994.

"E.L.M. Aged 15
He cometh forth like a flower and is cut down.
He fleeth also as a shadow and continueth not.
Erected in remembrance of a most dear and only child who was suddenly removed into eternity by a fall from the adjacent cliff on the rocks below.
28th August 1846.

Each side of the obelisk is inscribed with biblical passages in relation to the afterlife.

Compton Bay

Compton Bay looking north west to Tennyson Down

Near hanover point isle of wight

Shore at the southern end of Compton Bay

Low tide at hanover point isle of wight

Low tide at Hanover Point

Surfing

Compton Bay is the Isle of wight's most famous surf spot.[1] With a choice of a rocky reef break or a slightly tamer but heavier sandbar break to choose from, the Bay is the island surfers' spot of choice,[2] and has proved a valuable playground to some of the island's best surfers such as Johnny Fryer,[3] Joe Trueman,[4] Dave Gray,[5] Ray Hutchings, Alan Reed, Dylan Gray[6] and Zoe Sheath [7]

Coordinates: 50°39′43″N 1°29′24″W / 50.662°N 1.49°W

References

  1. ^ "Isle of Wight - Compton Surf Report, Surf Forecast and Live Surf Webcams". magicseaweed.com. Retrieved 2 August 2016.
  2. ^ "Search for "compton" - Wight Surf HistoryWight Surf History". wightsurfhistory.co.uk. Retrieved 2 August 2016.
  3. ^ "Johnny Fryer — Official website of the UK Pro Surfer". Archived from the original on 19 September 2010. Retrieved 2 August 2016.
  4. ^ "Search for "joe truman" - Wight Surf HistoryWight Surf History". wightsurfhistory.co.uk. Retrieved 2 August 2016.
  5. ^ "Search for "Dave Gray" - Wight Surf HistoryWight Surf History". wightsurfhistory.co.uk. Retrieved 2 August 2016.
  6. ^ "Search for "Dylan Gray" - Wight Surf HistoryWight Surf History". wightsurfhistory.co.uk. Retrieved 2 August 2016.
  7. ^ "Search for "Zoe Sheath" - Wight Surf HistoryWight Surf History". wightsurfhistory.co.uk. Retrieved 2 August 2016.
Afton Down

Afton Down is a chalk down near the village of Freshwater on the Isle of Wight. Afton Down faces Compton Bay directly to the west, while Freshwater is approximately one mile north.

It was the site of the Isle of Wight Festival 1970, where the Guinness Book of Records estimates 600,000 to 700,000, and possibly 800,000 people, flocked to see the musical talents of Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Free, The Who, The Doors, Ten Years After and Jimi Hendrix.In keeping with the native flora of Compton Bay, a variety of hardy plants grow on the down. Large European gorse bushes grow on the cliff, with the shelter they provide allowing other plants such as wild cabbage and bird's foot trefoil to thrive. Due to the strong prevailing wind from the English channel to the west, no large trees are able to grow on the down, allowing shrubs and grasses to thrive. The Isle of Wight's county flower, the pyramidal orchid, also grows here, along with Plantago lanceolata, the main food plant for the rare Glanville fritillary.

A car park is situated near the highest point of the Military Road's route over the down, and allows for walkers to travel along a footpath downhill towards Freshwater Bay.

There is an obelisk on Afton Down near the cliff edge. It is inscribed with a memorial to 15 year-old Edward Lewis Miller of Goudhurst in Kent who died after falling from the cliff in 1846. This obelisk was Grade II listed in 1994.

E.L.M. Aged 15 He cometh forth like a flower and is cut down. He fleeth also as a shadow and continueth not. Erected in remembrance of a most dear and only child who was suddenly removed into eternity by a fall from the adjacent cliff on the rocks below. 28th August 1846.

Each side of the obelisk is inscribed with biblical passages in relation to the afterlife.

In the 17th century it was common for local people to descend the cliffs to collect seabirds and pick samphire. The birds were killed and plucked and their feathers sold, and the carcasses were sold to local fisherman to bait crab pots. The samphire was pickled and sent to London in barrels.Freshwater Bay Golf Course is located on Afton Down.On the downs are a group of 24 barrows comprising, a long barrow 34.7 m long, 0.9 m high and oriented east-west, 17 bowl barrows, 4 bell barrows and 2 disc barrows (One of which is where the golf course is located). One barrow has been the subject of archaeological interest, and is thought to be from the Bronze Age. The site was excavated in 1817 revealing nothing of significance in the long barrow, but several cremations in the round barrows.

Back of the Wight

Back of the Wight is an area on the Isle of Wight in England. The area has a distinct historical and social background and geographically isolated by the chalk hills immediately to the North and until recently, poor transport infrastructure. Primarily agricultural, the Back of the Wight is made up of small villages spread out along the coast, including Brighstone, Shorwell and Mottistone.

Brook Bay

Brook Bay is a bay on the south western coast of the Isle of Wight, England. It lies to the west of the village of Brook. It faces south west out into the English Channel. It stretches about 2km from Hanover Point in the east to Sudmoor Point to the west. Much of the surrounding land, including the hamlet of Brookgreen is owned by the National Trust.

The beach is predominantly sand. The seabed is rocky to the west as it consists of the hazardous Brook Ledges but is rock-free near the concrete slipway.

The bay is best accessed from the nearby car park and the slipway down to the beach.

Both Brook Chine and Churchill Chine empty into Brook Bay.

The Isle of Wight Coastal Path runs along the cliff edge for the entire extent of the bay

Compton Chine

Compton Chine is a geological feature on the south west coast of the Isle of Wight, England. It lies between the village of Brook to the east and Freshwater Bay to the west. It is a small sandy coastal gully, one of a number of such chines on the island created by stream erosion of soft Cretaceous rocks. It leads from the 50 foot high clifftop to the beach of Compton Bay.

The Chine drains water off the slopes of Compton Down, to the north, into the sea.

The Isle of Wight Coastal Path crosses the top of the chine via a small footbridge.

Culture of the Isle of Wight

As an island, the Isle of Wight maintains a culture close to, but distinct from, that of the south of England. A high proportion of the population are now 'overners' rather than locally born, and so with a few notable exceptions it has more often formed the backdrop for cultural events of wider rather than island-specific significance.

The Island has inspired many creative works. Local people often seek to defend their real or perceived culture, and local politics is often dictated by a desire to preserve the traditions and habits of the Island.

The first creative flowering occurred during the reign of Queen Victoria, under whose patronage the island became a fashionable destination for the gentry.

Dinosaurs of the Isle of Wight

The Isle of Wight is one of the richest dinosaur localities in Europe, with over 20 species of dinosaur having been recognised from the early Cretaceous Period (in particular between 132 and 110 million years ago), some of which were first identified on the island, as well as the contemporary non-dinosaurian species of crocodile, turtle and pterosaur.

Compton Bay, near Freshwater features dinosaur footprints which are visible at low tide.

Freshwater, Isle of Wight

Freshwater is a large village and civil parish at the western end of the Isle of Wight, England. Freshwater Bay is a small cove on the south coast of the Island which also gives its name to the nearby part of Freshwater.

Freshwater sits at the western end of the region known as the Back of the Wight or the West Wight which is a popular tourist area.Freshwater is close to steep chalk cliffs. It was the birthplace of physicist Robert Hooke and was the home of Poet Laureate Alfred Lord Tennyson.

Freshwater Redoubt

Freshwater Redoubt, also known as Fort Redoubt (map reference SZ345856) is an old Palmerston fort built in Freshwater Bay on the western end of the Isle of Wight. Construction work for the fort began in 1855 and was completed in 1856. It was finally sold in 1928 and has now been converted into a private residence.

Geology of the Isle of Wight

The geology of the Isle of Wight is dominated by sedimentary rocks of Cretaceous and Paleogene age. This sequence was affected by the late stages of the Alpine Orogeny, forming the Isle of Wight monocline, the cause of the steeply-dipping outcrops of the Chalk Group and overlying Paleogene strata seen at The Needles, Alum Bay and Whitecliff Bay.

Isle of Wight

The Isle of Wight (; also referred to informally as The Island or abbreviated to IoW) is a county and the largest and second-most populous island in England. It is in the English Channel, between 2 and 5 miles off the coast of Hampshire, separated by the Solent. The island has resorts that have been holiday destinations since Victorian times, and is known for its mild climate, coastal scenery, and verdant landscape of fields, downland and chines. The island is designated a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve.

The island has been home to the poets Swinburne and Tennyson and to Queen Victoria, who built her much-loved summer residence and final home Osborne House at East Cowes. It has a maritime and industrial tradition including boat-building, sail-making, the manufacture of flying boats, the hovercraft, and Britain's space rockets. The island hosts annual music festivals including the Isle of Wight Festival, which in 1970 was the largest rock music event ever held. It has well-conserved wildlife and some of the richest cliffs and quarries for dinosaur fossils in Europe.

The isle was owned by a Norman family until 1293 and was earlier a kingdom in its own right. In common with the Crown dependencies, the British Crown was then represented on the island by the Governor of the Isle of Wight until 1995. The island has played an important part in the defence of the ports of Southampton and Portsmouth, and been near the front-line of conflicts through the ages, including the Spanish Armada and the Battle of Britain. Rural for most of its history, its Victorian fashionability and the growing affordability of holidays led to significant urban development during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Historically part of Hampshire, the island became a separate administrative county in 1890. It continued to share the Lord Lieutenant of Hampshire until 1974, when it was made its own ceremonial county. Apart from a shared police force, there is now no administrative link with Hampshire, although a combined local authority with Portsmouth and Southampton was considered, this is now unlikely to proceed.The quickest public transport link to the mainland is the hovercraft from Ryde to Southsea; three vehicle ferry and two catamaran services cross the Solent to Southampton, Lymington and Portsmouth.

KIPP (organization)

The Knowledge is Power Program, commonly known as KIPP, is a nationwide network of free open-enrollment college-preparatory schools in low income communities throughout the United States. KIPP is America's largest network of charter schools. The head offices are in San Francisco, Chicago, New York City, and Washington, D.C..KIPP was founded in 1994 by Mike Feinberg and Dave Levin, two Teach For America corps members, influenced by Harriett Ball. In 1995, they opened two KIPP middle schools, one in Houston and one in New York City. Both schools were among the highest-performing schools in their communities by 1999. KIPP was one of the charter school organizations to help produce the Relay Graduate School of Education for teacher training.

KIPP began in 1994 after co-founders Dave Levin and Mike Feinberg completed their two-year commitment to Teach For America. A year later, they launched a program for fifth graders in a public school in inner-city Houston, Texas. Feinberg developed KIPP Academy Houston into a charter school, while Levin went on to establish KIPP Academy New York in the South Bronx. The original KIPP Academies have a sustained record of high student achievement.

List of National Trust land in England

This is a list of National Trust land in England. This is land that is looked after by the National Trust and includes coast, countryside and heritage landscapes. This does not include NT properties, unless they contain significant estate land.

The list is subdivided using the National Trust's own system which divides England into nine regions. These are not the same as the official Regions of England.

The counties of England are divided up as follows:

Devon & Cornwall

East of England

Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, part of Hertfordshire, Norfolk, Suffolk

East Midlands

Derbyshire, Leicestershire, S Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire, Nottinghamshire, Rutland

North West

Cheshire, Cumbria, Greater Manchester, Lancashire, Merseyside

South East

East Sussex, Kent, Surrey, West Sussex

Thames & Solent

Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Hampshire, Isle of Wight, Greater London, Oxfordshire

West Midlands

Birmingham, Herefordshire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, Warwickshire, Worcestershire

Wessex

Bristol / Bath, Dorset, Gloucestershire, Somerset, Wiltshire

Yorkshire & North East

County Durham, N Lincolnshire, Newcastle & Tyneside, Northumberland, Teesside, Yorkshire

List of bays of the British Isles

This is a list of bays of the British Isles, geographically by island. They are listed by island, in clockwise order, from the stated starting point.

List of shipwrecks in November 1838

The list of shipwrecks in November 1838 includes ships sunk, foundered, grounded, or otherwise lost during November 1838.

List of shipwrecks in the 14th century

The list of shipwrecks in the 14th century includes some ships sunk, wrecked or otherwise lost between (and including) the years 1301 to 1400.

Newbury railway station

Newbury railway station is located in the centre of Newbury, Berkshire, England, 53 miles 6 chains (85.42 km) from London Paddington. It is served by stopping services operated by Great Western Railway between Reading and Newbury and Bedwyn, and by many of its services between London Paddington and Exeter St Davids and other parts of Devon and Cornwall

The station was once a junction with the now-defunct north-south Didcot, Newbury and Southampton Railway. It was also the junction for the also defunct Lambourn Valley Railway.

Shippards Chine

Shippards Chine is a geological feature on the south west coast of the Isle of Wight, England. It is west of the village of Brook and just north of Hanover Point.

It was a small sandy coastal gully; however, it has been redirected through an culvert down to beach level to reduce its effect on erosion to the cliff. A set of steps have been attached to the culvert to provide access to the beach of Compton Bay.

The Chine/culvert carries water from a lake about 200m to the east, just across the nearby Military Road and also from small brooks that run down the hillside to the north.

The Isle of Wight Coastal Path crosses the top of the chine via a small footbridge. The surrounding land is owned and managed by the National Trust and is accessible from a nearby car park.

Shorwell

Shorwell (pronounced Shorrel by some locals and Islanders) is a village and civil parish on the Isle of Wight, United Kingdom. It is 4 1⁄2 miles (7.2 km) from Newport in the southwest of the island. Shorwell was one of Queen Victoria's favourite places to visit on the Isle of Wight.

Wessex Formation

The Wessex Formation is a fossil-rich English geological formation that dates from the Berriasian to Barremian stages (about 145–125 million years ago) of the Early Cretaceous. It forms part of the Wealden Group and underlies the younger Vectis Formation and overlies the Durlston Formation. The dominant lithology of this unit is mudstone with some interbedded sandstones.

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