Composite rules shinty–hurling

Composite rules shinty–hurling (Irish: Rialacha chomhréiteach sinteag-iomáint)—sometimes known simply as shinty–hurling—is a hybrid sport which was developed to facilitate international matches between shinty players and hurling players.

Shinty–hurling is one of few team sports in the world without any dedicated clubs or leagues. It is currently played by both men's and women's teams only in tournaments or once-off internationals. The women's form of the game is called shinty/camogie.

Ireland are the leading team in the sport, having won sixteen of the thirty international series against Scotland to date.

Composite rules shinty–hurling
Highest governing body
First played19th century
Clubsnone
Characteristics
ContactYes
Team members15
Mixed genderYes, though women's form known as shinty/camogie
TypeHybrid sport, team sport
Equipment
VenueAnywhere
Presence
Country or regionWorldwide

Rules

The rules of the composite sport are designed to allow for neither side to gain an advantage, eliminating or imposing certain restrictions. The goals are those used in hurling, with 3 points for a goal (in the net under the crossbar) and 1 point for a shot over the crossbar. A stationary ball taken straight from the ground and shot over the crossbar scores 2 points. For the 2012 International Series, a goal became worth 5 points in an effort to increase the number of goals. This rule was abandoned for the 2013 series, in favour of the traditional model of 3 points for a goal.

Players may not catch the ball unless they are the goalkeeper (or a defender on the line for a penalty) and this must be released within three steps. Players may not kick the ball, but can drag the ball with their foot.

Although there is a statutory size for the ball to be used in the games, there is often a custom of using a sliotar in one half and a shinty ball in the other. Each half lasts 35 minutes.

History

The first games played were challenge matches between London Camanachd and London GAA in 1896 and Glasgow Cowal and Dublin Celtic in 1897 and 1898, with the first game played at Celtic Park.[1] However, there was then a hiatus until Scottish representative teams and Irish sides took place in the 1920s. Following intermittent international games between Scotland and an all-Ireland team before the Second World War, controversy arose as the British Government put pressure upon the Camanachd Association to cease from co-operating with the Gaelic Athletic Association, disapproving of their perceived anti-British viewpoint[2][3]

However, universities in both countries kept the link going after the war and this led to a resumption of international fixtures between the two codes in the 1970s.

After a long run of Irish successes, Scotland won four fixtures in a row from 2005 until Ireland reclaimed the title in 2009. Scotland's successes have been marred by a lack of interest from an Irish perspective. Unlike the international rules football tests between Australia and Ireland, few players from the top flight counties participate in the event—though in recent times this trend has bucked and more higher ranked Irish players have represented their nation.

2007 also saw the use of compromise rules as a way of developing the Gaelic languages in Ireland and Scotland by the Columba Initiative. A team called Alba, made up of Scottish Gaelic speakers, played Míchael Breathnach CLG, from Inverin, Galway. The project was repeated in 2008.[4] The Gaelic speakers international was played for a third time in 2010 in Portree in the Isle of Skye on 13 February 2010.

There are also Scottish/Irish women's and under-21s sides which have competed against one another.

In 2009, the first full shinty/hurling match in the United States took place between Skye Camanachd and the San Francisco Rovers.

In 2010, the fixture was played at Croke Park before the international rules football game and then a return leg was played at the Bught Park two weeks later.

On 28 April 2012 the inaugural match between the teams of Irish Defence Forces and the British Army was played at Bught Park in aid of PoppyScotland.[5]

International series

An international series for men, women and under 21s is played annually, with test matches rotating between venues in Scotland and Ireland. Ireland are the leading team in the series, having won 9 of 16 senior men's test matches. Camogie-Shinty is the women's version of the game.

See also

References

  1. ^ "The first combined shinty/hurling match 1897". BBC.
  2. ^ MacKenzie, Fraser (8 October 2000). "Celtic festival sees codes come together". The Sunday Herald.
  3. ^ "Hurling himself into the battle". Scotland on Sunday.
  4. ^ "Gaelic team to represent Scotland in Galway". Camanachd Association. Retrieved 8 October 2008.
  5. ^ "Irish and British forces in historic sports meeting". The Scotsman.

External links

An Aird

An Aird is both an area of Fort William, Scotland, and also the largest dedicated shinty park in the town and is situated on the east bank of Loch Linnhe, near the centre of the town. It is located next to the Nevis Centre. An Aird regularly hosts both the Camanachd Cup Final and the Composite Rules Shinty/Hurling Internationals and is considered one of the finest parks in shinty. It is home to Fort William Shinty Club's various squads who have played there since moving from Claggan Park in the 1980s.

The capacity of the stadium is 5000, comprising a small stand which seats 400 and standing. It also has Fort William's clubhouse on the premises.

Despite shinty's profile in the town, efforts are afoot to evict Fort William Shinty Club from An Aird, in order to build a supermarket. The local authority, Highland Council, have come under fire for their care of the park, especially after the playing surface was stripped bare by rabbits. The company behind the planned development of a new supermarket were unequivocal in stating in April 2007 that there would be no development upon the An Aird pitch. [1]. In March 2008, Highland Council again came under fire for their negligence of the An Aird surface, which almost resulted in the loss of An Aird's prestigious status as a Camanachd Cup Final host stadium. [2] In February 2009 the stadium was attacked by vandals causing thousands of pounds of damage.

The shinty club will be forced to move to the Black Park in Fort William in season 2010 in order for renovation work to be done on the pitch at An Aird.[3]

The area was again marked for development in late 2010 with plans being made by an Edinburgh-based company to develop the site for a supermarket. This would involve moving the shinty club to a new location within the town.[4] Uncertainty over the availability of An Aird led to it losing the 2011 Camanachd Cup Final.[5] The club used Black Parks, near Inverlochy, for most of 2012.

Brian Campion (hurler)

Brian Campion (born 1984) is an Irish hurler who played as a goalkeeper, corner-back, full-back, wing-back and centre-back for the Laois senior team.

Born in Rathdowney, County Laois, Campion first played competitive hurling during his schooling at St. Fergal's College. He arrived on the inter-county scene as a member of the minor team before later joining the under-21 side. He made his senior debut during the 2005 championship. Campion immediately became a regular member of the starting fifteen and won one National League (Division 2) medal.

At international level Campion played for the composite rules shinty-hurling team at under-21 level in 2005. He was a member of the Leinster inter-provincial team on a number of occasions, however, he never won a Railway Cup medal. At club level Campion is a three-time championship medallist with Rathdowney-Errill.

Throughout his career Campion made 28 championship appearances. He announced his retirement from inter-county hurling on 12 January 2015.

Bught Park

Bught Park (Gaelic: Pàirc nam Bochd ) is the largest park in the city of Inverness, Scotland, and is situated on the western bank of the River Ness. It is home to the Inverness Highland Games and a small scale outdoor music festival. It is located next to the city's sports centre, swimming pool and BMX track. The Bught Park is also the name for the sports stadium situated within the confines of the park which regularly hosts both the Camanachd Cup Final and the Composite Rules Shinty/Hurling Internationals and is considered one of the finest parks in shinty. It is also home to Inverness Shinty Club who have played there since the 1920s. The park is situated on land that was formerly the Bught House estate. An 18th century stately home on the site was demolished for the creation of the Ice Centre in the 1960s.

The capacity of the stadium is 5000, comprising standing and the wooden grandstand. The stadium was the centre of controversy in June 2009 when Highland Council, having evicted Inverness City from the Northern Meeting Park offered the use of the facility to the football team without consulting with the shinty club.

Columba Project

The Columba Project (Gaelic: Iomairt Cholm Cille), formerly known as the Columba Initiative is a program for Gaelic speakers in Scotland and Ireland to meet each other more often, and in so doing to learn more of the language, heritage and lifestyles of one another. It was named after Colm Cille (St Columba, 521–597 AD), whose monasteries shaped and spanned the Gaelic world of Ireland and Scotland.

Conor Lehane

Conor Lehane (born 30 July 1992) is an Irish hurler who currently plays as a centre-forward for the Cork senior team.Born in Midleton, County Cork, Lehane first played competitive hurling at Midleton CBS Secondary School. Here he won Rice Cup and Cork Colleges medals before later featuring on the Harty Cup team. As a student at University College Cork, Lehane won a Fitzgibbon Cup medal in 2013.

Lehane first appeared for the Midleton club at underage levels, winning a county minor championship medal in 2010 before claiming county under-21 championship medals in 2011 and 2013. As a member of the Midleton senior team he also won a county senior championship medal in 2013.

Having played for Cork at under-15 and under-17 levels, Lehane was just sixteen when he was selected for the Cork minor team. He played for two championship seasons with the minor team. Lehane subsequently enjoyed a three-year stint with the Cork under-21 team. By this stage he had also joined the Cork senior team, making his debut during the 2011 Waterford Crystal Cup. Since then Lehane has become a regular member of the starting fifteen. An All-Ireland runner-up in 2013, he won Munster medals in 2014 and 2017.

At international level Lehane won championship honours as a member of the composite rules shinty–hurling team in 2014.

Craig Doyle (hurler)

Craig Doyle (born 1988) is an Irish hurler who plays as a full-forward for the Carlow senior team.

Born in Bagenalstown, County Carlow, Doyle first played competitive hurling whilst at school in the Presentation De La Salle College. He arrived on the inter-county scene at the age of sixteen when he first linked up with the Carlow minor team, before later lining out with the under-21 side. He made his senior debut in the 2007 Christy Ring Cup. Doyle has been a regular fixture on team since that initial appearance, and has won two Christy Ring Cup medals and one National League (Division 2A) medal.

Doyle represented the Ireland national hurling team on a number of occasions, winning his sole Composite rules shinty–hurling medal in 2011. At club level he is a Leinster medallist in the junior grade with Erin's Own.

Derek Lyng

Derek Lyng (born 4 July 1978) is an Irish retired hurler who played as a midfielder for the Kilkenny senior team.Born in Urlingford, County Kilkenny, Lyng attended St. Kieran's College but failed to make the college hurling team. He arrived on the inter-county scene at the age of twenty-one when he joined the Kilkenny under-21 team. He joined the senior team for the 2001 championship. Lyng went on to play a key part for Kilkenny for over almost a decade, and won six All-Ireland medals, eight Leinster medals and four National Hurling League medals. He was an All-Ireland runner-up on two occasions.

At international level Lyng has played for the composite rules shinty-hurling team. As a member of the Leinster inter-provincial team on a number of occasions, he won two Railway Cup medals. At club level Lyng was a one-time championship medallist in the junior grade with Emeralds.

Throughout his career Lyng made 39 championship appearances. His announced his retirement from inter-county hurling on 1 December 2010.In retirement from playing Lyng became involved in team management and coaching. He was a selector with the successful Leinster inter-provincial team in 2012. In September 2013 Lyng was appointed as a selector to the Kilkenny senior team.

Eoin Kelly (Tipperary hurler)

Eoin Kelly (born 6 January 1982) is an Irish hurler who played as a right corner-forward for the Tipperary senior team.

Born in Mullinahone, County Tipperary, Kelly first played competitive hurling whilst at school in St. Kieran's College. He arrived on the inter-county scene at the age of fifteen when he first linked up with the Tipperary minor team as a goalkeeper, before later joining the under-21 side. He made his senior debut during the 2000 championship. Kelly went on to enjoy a lengthy career, and won two All-Ireland medals, five Munster medals and two National Hurling League medals. He was an All-Ireland runner-up on three occasions.

At international level Kelly has played for the composite rules shinty-hurling team. As a member of the Munster inter-provincial team on a number of occasions, he won two Railway Cup medals. At club level Kelly is a one-time championship medallist with Mullinahone.

His brother, Paul Kelly, is also an All-Ireland medallist with Tipperary, while his first cousins, Niall and Ollie Moran enjoyed lengthy careers with Limerick.

Kelly's career tally of 21 goals and 368 points ranks him as the third highest championship scorer of all-time. He remains Tipperary's all-time top scorer.

Throughout his career Kelly made 63 championship appearances. His announced his retirement from inter-county hurling on 1 December 2014.Kelly is widely regarded as one of the greatest hurlers of the modern era. During his playing days he won six All-Star awards. He has often been voted onto teams made up of the sport's greats, including at right corner-forward on a special Munster team of the quarter century in 2009.

Iomain

Iomain was a hybrid sport formed from shinty and hurling created in 2013.

Iomain is a Gaelic word, meaning "driving", and is one of the words traditionally used in Scotland to refer to Shinty and Irish dialect to Hurling.

It was argued that it might replace composite rules shinty–hurling in Scotland-Ireland internationals. Unlike composite rules, it was to use a single type of stick for both sides, and also one goal design.

The stick was made in the traditional shinty style with a much large club face as in hurling but a longer shinty shaft. The goals used were shinty goals. It was designed also to be similar to the ground hurling that was once prevalent in Ireland, but has been superseded by the aerial variety.

Iomain was played at Croke Park in October 2013 in a demonstration game. The match finished 5-0. [1] However, there has never been a repeat of the initial trial at Croke Park.

Ireland national hurling team

The Ireland national hurling team, consisting solely of hurlers, is a representative team for Ireland (both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland) in the sport of composite rules shinty–hurling.

The team is usually made up of a mixture of high-profile hurlers who compete in the All-Ireland Senior Hurling Championship as well as lesser-known players who play for smaller counties which traditionally compete in the Christy Ring and Nicky Rackard Cups.At present the only team it plays is the Scotland national shinty team, on an annual basis in the Shinty/Hurling International Series. Ireland have won 7 of 12 series played at men's senior level. The current managers of the senior men's team are Jeffrey Lynskey and Gregory O'Kane, who took over the role from Michael Walshe at the end of 2014. A former captain of the team was Tommy Walsh.

A women's side and men's under 21 side also compete against Scottish opponents in separate series each year.

James Toher

James Toher (born 1993) is an Irish hurler who plays as a right wing-forward for the Meath senior team.

Born in Trim, County Meath, Toher first arrived on the inter-county scene at the age of sixteen when he first linked up with the Meath minor team before later joining the under-21 side. He made his senior debut during the 2012 league. Toher quickly became a regular member of the starting fifteen and has since won one Christy Ring Cup medal (2016). He captained his side to this historic win, lifting the cup twice in a single month after a controversial score line deemed correct by the referee was overturned by the CCC and replay awarded.At international level Toher has played for the composite rules shinty-hurling team, captaining the U21s in 2013 and 2014 and made his senior debut in 2015.. At club level he plays with Trim. Now he is known as Mr. Toher in Ratoath College https://www.ratoathcollege.ie where he teaches Geography and C.S.P.E.

John Griffin (hurler)

John Griffin (born 1983 )is an Irish hurler who plays as a midfielder for the Kerry senior team.

Born in Lixnaw, County Kerry, Griffin first played competitive hurling in his youth. He arrive don the inter-county scene at the age of seventeen when he first linked up with the Kerry minor team before later joining the under-21 side. He made his senior debut during the 2006 league. Griffin quickly became a regular member of the starting fifteen and has won two Christy Ring Cup medals and two National Hurling League medals in the lower divisions. He has been a Christy Ring runner-up on three occasions.

At international level Griffin has played for the composite rules shinty-hurling team, winning a championship medal in 2009. At club level he is a three-time championship medallist with Lixnaw. As a Gaelic footballer Griffin is a one-time All-Ireland medallist with Finuge in the junior grade. He has also won three Munster medals and three championship medals in the intermediate and junior grades.

John Shaw (hurler)

John Shaw (born 1982 in Raharney, County Westmeath, Ireland) is an Irish sportsperson. He plays hurling with his local club Raharney and has been a member of the Westmeath senior inter-county team since 2000.

Michael Rice (hurler)

Michael Rice (born 27 January 1984) is an Irish hurler who played as a midfielder for the Kilkenny senior team.Born in Carrickshock, County Kilkenny, Rice first played competitive hurling during his schooling at St. Kieran's College. He arrived on the inter-county scene at the age of seventeen when he first linked up with the Kilkenny minor team captaining them to an allireland final, before later joining the under-21 side. He joined the senior panel during the 2005 championship. Rice subsequently became a regular member of the starting fifteen and has since won two All-Ireland medals, six Leinster medals and two National Hurling League medals on the field of play. He has been an All-Ireland runner-up on one occasion.

At international level Rice has played for the composite rules shinty-hurling team, captaining his country to the title in 2011. As a member of the Leinster inter-provincial team on a number of occasions, he has won three Railway Cup medals. At club level Rice is a one-time Leinster medallist in the intermediate grade with Carrickshock. In addition to this he has also won one championship medal.

Peter Huban

Peter Huban (born 5 July 1976) is an Irish retired hurler who played as a full-back for the Galway senior team.Born in Kinvara, County Galway, Huban first played competitive hurling during his schooling at Our Lady's College in Gort. He arrived on the inter-county scene at the age of seventeen when he first linked up with the Galway minor team, before later joining the under-21 side. He made his senior debut during the 1999 championship. Huban enjoyed a brief career with Galway and ended his career without silverware.

At international level Huban has played for the composite rules shinty-hurling team at under-21 level, captaining his country to the title in 1996. At club level he enjoyed a lengthy career with Kinvara.

Throughout his inter-county career Huban made 1 championship appearances for Galway . His retirement came following the conclusion of the 1999 championship.

Scotland national shinty team

The Scotland national shinty team is the team selected to represent Scotland and the sport of shinty in the annual composite rules Shinty/Hurling International Series against the Ireland national hurling team. The team is selected by the Camanachd Association.

As well as the men's senior team currently headed by coach Ronald Ross, a men's under-21 team and women's team also competes against equivalent Irish sides each year.

Sean Power (hurler)

Sean Power is a former intercounty hurler for Dublin, a Commercials hurling club captain and a former player with St. Mary's GFC in Saggart.

Power made his debut for Dublin against Galway in the 1992 National Hurling League, with his Championship debut following against Wexford in 1993. His final game for Dublin was a 2001 Leinster Senior Hurling Championship match. He started his Dublin career as a half-back but reverted to full-back for the majority of his intercounty career. He was also captain during the 1999 and 2000 seasons.

Power won a Division 2 National League medal with Dublin in 1997, played with Leinster 96, 97 and 98 winning a Railway Cup medal in 1998. With Commercials he won Under 21, Intermediate and Senior B Championships and a Junior football championship with St Marys. He also represented Ireland against Scotland in the composite rules shinty-hurling games in 1995 and 1998.

Shinty in Russia

Shinty is a very small minority sport in Russia, played primarily in Krasnodar but with some enthusiasts in Moscow.

Tommy Walsh (Tullaroan hurler)

Thomas "Tommy" Walsh (born 27 May 1983) is an Irish hurler who played as a right wing-back for the Kilkenny senior team.

Born in Tullaroan, County Kilkenny, Walsh first played competitive hurling during his schooling at St. Kieran's College. He arrived on the inter-county scene at the age of seventeen when he first linked up with the Kilkenny minor team, before later joining the under-21 side. He joined the senior panel during the 2002 championship. Walsh became a regular member of the starting fifteen the following year, and won nine All-Ireland medals (two as a non-playing substitute), ten Leinster medals and seven National League medals. He was an All-Ireland runner-up on two occasions.

At international level Walsh has played for the composite rules shinty-hurling team, captaining his country to the title in 2009. As a member of the Leinster inter-provincial team on a number of occasions, he won five Railway Cup medals. At club level Walsh continues to play with Tullaroan.Walsh's grandfather, Paddy Grace, as well as his brother, Pádraig, have also enjoyed All-Ireland success with Kilkenny. His sister, Grace, is a key member of the Kilkenny senior camogie team.Throughout his career Walsh made 56 championship appearances. He announced his retirement from inter-county hurling on 20 November 2014.Walsh is one of the most successful players of all-time. During his playing days he won nine consecutive All-Star awards, while he was later chosen as one of the 125 greatest hurlers of all-time in a 2009 poll. That same year Walsh made a clean sweep of all the top individual awards, winning the All-Star, Texaco and GPA Hurler of the Year awards, while he was chosen on the Leinster team of the past twenty-five years.

Equipment
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Variations
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Women's shinty
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Basket sports
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