Composite Gazetteer of Antarctica

The Composite Gazetteer of Antarctica (CGA) of the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR) is the authoritative international gazetteer containing all the Antarctic toponyms published in national gazetteers, plus basic information about those names and the relevant geographical features. The Gazetteer includes also parts of the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans (GEBCO) gazetteer for under-sea features situated south of 60° south latitude.

As of September 2018, the overall content of the CGA amounts to 37,834 geographic names for 19,744 features including some 500 features with two or more entirely different names, contributed by the following sources:

Country Names
United States 13,192
United Kingdom 5,040
Russia 4,808
New Zealand 2,597
Australia 2,551
Argentina 2,545
Chile 1,866
Norway 1,706
Bulgaria 1,391
Germany 393
Poland 365
China 359
Japan 345
France 223
GEBCO 182
Belgium 117
Italy 53
Spain 35
South Korea 27
India 21
Ecuador 9
Uruguay 5
South Africa 2
Canada 2
Ross Island Map USGS 250k
Place names from the Composite Antarctic Gazetteer on a topographic map of Ross Island.
Vinson-Map
Place names from the Composite Antarctic Gazetteer on a topographic map of Sentinel Range, Ellsworth Mountains.
Livingston-Island-Map-2010
Place names of diverse national origins from the Composite Antarctic Gazetteer on a topographic map of the South Shetland Islands.

National Authorities for Antarctic place-names

Country / Official authority:

Argentina: Instituto Geográfico Nacional, Servicio de Hidrografía Naval
Australia: Australian Antarctic Division Place Names Committee
Bulgaria: Antarctic Place-names Commission
Canada: Geographical Names Board of Canada
Chile: Instituto Hidrográfíco y Oceanográfico de la Armada de Chile (SHOA) and Instituto Geográfico Militar (IGM)
China: Chinese Place-names Committee
France: Commission de Toponymie des TAAF, Institut Géographique National (Commission of Toponymy of TAAF, National Geographic Institute)
Germany: Ständiger Ausschuß für Geographische Namen (Permanent committee on geographical names)
Italy: Comitato per i nomi geografici antartici (Antarctic geographic names Committee)
Japan: Antarctic Place-names Committee of Japan
New Zealand: Antarctic Place-names Committee of New Zealand
Norway: Antarctic Place-names Committee of Norway, Norsk Polarinstitutt
Poland: Committee of Polar Research of the Polish Academy of Sciences
Russia: Russian Interministerial Commission on Geographical Names
UK: British Antarctic Survey UK Antarctic Place-names Committee
Uruguay: Instituto Antártico Uruguayo
United States: United States Board on Geographic Names
GEBCO: GEBCO Sub-Committee on Undersea Feature Names

External links

Afala Island

Afala Island (Bulgarian: остров Афала, ‘Ostrov Afala’ \'os-trov a-'fa-la\) is the rocky island off the north coast of Nelson Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica extending 360 m in west-southwest to east-northeast direction and 310 m in south-north direction.

The island is “named after the ocean fishing trawler Afala of the Bulgarian company Ocean Fisheries – Burgas that operated in Antarctic waters off South Georgia during its fishing trip under Captain Kosyo Kostov in the 1985/86 season. The Bulgarian fishermen, along with those of the Soviet Union, Poland and East Germany are the pioneers of modern Antarctic fishing industry.”

Akin Island

Akin Island (Bulgarian: остров Акин, ‘Ostrov Akin’ \'os-trov a-'kin\) is the 280 m long in southeast-northwest direction and 100 m wide rocky island lying off the north coast of Nelson Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. It is “named after Akin Point on the Bulgarian Black Sea Coast.”

Alfeus Island

Alfeus Island (Bulgarian: остров Алфеус, ‘Ostrov Alfeus’ \'os-trov al-'fe-us\) is the 310 m long in west-southwest to east-northeast direction and 120 m wide rocky island lying off the north coast of Smith Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica.

The island is “named after the ocean fishing trawler Alfeus of the Bulgarian company Ocean Fisheries – Burgas whose ships operated in the waters of South Georgia, Kerguelen, the South Orkney Islands, South Shetland Islands and Antarctic Peninsula from 1970 to the early 1990s. The Bulgarian fishermen, along with those of the Soviet Union, Poland and East Germany are the pioneers of modern Antarctic fishing industry.”

Aurelia Island

Aurelia Island (Bulgarian: остров Аурелия, ‘Ostrov Aurelia’ \'os-trov au-'re-li-ya\) is the 390 m long in west–east direction and 190 m wide rocky island lying off Limets Peninsula in northern Low Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. Its coastline is highly indented.

The island is “named after the ocean fishing trawler Aurelia of the Bulgarian company Ocean Fisheries – Burgas that operated in Antarctic waters off South Georgia and the South Orkney Islands during its fishing trip under Captain Ivan Presnakov from September 1977 to April 1978. The Bulgarian fishermen, along with those of the Soviet Union, Poland and East Germany are the pioneers of modern Antarctic fishing industry.”

Balsha Island

Balsha Island (Bulgarian: остров Балша, ‘Ostrov Balsha’ \'os-trov 'bal-sha\) is an ice-free island in the Dunbar group off the northwest coast of Varna Peninsula, Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. It is situated 1.5 km (0.93 mi) northwest of Slab Point and 2.8 km (1.7 mi) north of Kotis Point. Extending 600 by 300 m (660 by 330 yd), surface area 17 hectares (42 acres). The area was visited by early 19th century sealers.

The island is named after the settlement of Balsha in western Bulgaria.

Bekas Rock

Bekas Rock (Bulgarian: скала Бекас, ‘Skala Bekas’ \ska-'la be-'kas\) is the 140 m long in southwest-northeast direction and 60 m wide rock lying west of Rugged Island on the west side of Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. The area was visited by early 19th century sealers.

The rock is “named after the ocean fishing trawler Bekas of the Bulgarian company Ocean Fisheries – Burgas whose ships operated in the waters of South Georgia, Kerguelen, the South Orkney Islands, South Shetland Islands and Antarctic Peninsula from 1970 to the early 1990s. The Bulgarian fishermen, along with those of the Soviet Union, Poland and East Germany are the pioneers of modern Antarctic fishing industry.”

Bulgarian toponyms in Antarctica

Bulgarian toponyms in Antarctica are approved by the Antarctic Place-names Commission in compliance with its Toponymic Guidelines, and formally given by the President of the Republic according to the Bulgarian Constitution and the established international and Bulgarian practice. Place naming is confined to nameless geographic features situated in the Antarctic Treaty area, the region south of the parallel 60 degrees south latitude.

Details of the Bulgarian Antarctic toponyms are published by the websites of the Commission and the international Composite Gazetteer of Antarctica maintained by the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research (SCAR).

Alphabetical lists of the relevant place names:

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z

Cervellati Glacier

Cervellati Glacier (78°23′S 85°43′W) is the 5 nmi (9 km; 6 mi) long glacier situated southeast of Patton Glacier and northwest of Ramorino Glacier on the east slope of Sentinel Range in the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica. It flows northeastwards between Tyree Ridge and Epperly Ridge, and enters Crosswell Glacier southeast of Mount Bearskin. The feature was named by US-ACAN in 2006 after Roberto Cervellati, Italian representative to the SCAR Expert Group on Geographic Information, 1992-2006, and director of the SCAR Composite Gazetteer of Antarctica in the same period.

Fregata Island

Fregata Island (Bulgarian: остров Фрегата, ‘Ostrov Fregata’ \'os-trov fre-'ga-ta\) is the 480 m long in southeast-northwest direction and 230 m wide rocky island lying off the north coast of Nelson Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica.

The island is “named after the ocean fishing trawler Fregata of the Bulgarian company Ocean Fisheries – Burgas whose ships operated in the waters of South Georgia, Kerguelen, the South Orkney Islands, South Shetland Islands and Antarctic Peninsula from 1970 to the early 1990s. The Bulgarian fishermen, along with those of the Soviet Union, Poland and East Germany are the pioneers of modern Antarctic fishing industry.”

Galiche Rock

Galiche Rock (Bulgarian: скала Галиче, ‘Skala Galiche’ \ska-'la 'ga-li-che\) is the large rock off Somovit Point on the east coast of Robert Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. It is extending 300 m (328 yd) in northwest-southeast direction and 180 m (197 yd) in northeast-southwest direction, and forming the south side of the entrance to Kruni Cove and the north side of the entrance to Tsepina Cove.The rock is named after the settlement of Galiche in Northwestern Bulgaria.

Kondor Island

Kondor Island (Bulgarian: остров Кондор, ‘Ostrov Kondor’ \'os-trov kon-'dor\) is the 320 m long in west–east direction and 140 m wide rocky island lying off the north coast of Nelson Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica.

The island is “named after the ocean fishing trawler Kondor of the Bulgarian company Ocean Fisheries – Burgas whose ships operated in the waters of South Georgia, Kerguelen, the South Orkney Islands, South Shetland Islands and Antarctic Peninsula from 1970 to the early 1990s. The Bulgarian fishermen, along with those of the Soviet Union, Poland and East Germany are the pioneers of modern Antarctic fishing industry.”

Koshava Island

Koshava Island (Bulgarian: остров Кошава, ‘Ostrov Koshava’ \'os-trov ko-'sha-va\) is the easternmost island in the Zed group off Varna Peninsula, northeastern Livingston Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica. The island is ice-free, extending 340 by 220 m (370 by 240 yd). Situated on the west side of the north entrance to McFarlane Strait, 140 m (150 yd) northeast of Lesidren Island, and 1.9 km (1.2 mi) north of Williams Point on Livingston Island. The area was visited by early 19th century sealers.

The island is named after the settlement of Koshava in northwestern Bulgaria.

Mount King (Antarctica)

Mount King is a large, smooth-crested mountain in the eastern extremity of the Tula Mountains. Part of the Australian Antarctic Gazetteer (Australian Antarctic Gazetteer Id 1581) and the SCAR Composite Gazetteer of Antarctica, it is located in Enderby Land, East Antarctica, which is claimed by Australia as part of the Australian Antarctic Territory. The head of Beaver Glacier is located very close to the base of Mount King.

Mount King was discovered and mapped in December, 1958, by an ANARE (Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions) dog-sledge party led by G.A. Knuckey. Named after Peter W. King, radio officer at Mawson in 1957 and 1958, a member of the dog-sledge party.

Presnakov Island

Presnakov Island (Bulgarian: Преснаков остров, ‘Presnakov Ostrov’ \pre-sna-'kov 'os-trov\) is the 390 m long in southeast-northwest direction and 100 m wide rocky island lying off the west coast of Low Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica.

The island is “named after Captain Ivan Presnakov (1932-2003), commander of the ocean fishing trawler Aurelia of the Bulgarian company Ocean Fisheries – Burgas during its fishing trip to Antarctic waters off South Georgia and the South Orkney Islands from September 1977 to April 1978. The Bulgarian fishermen, along with those of the Soviet Union, Poland and East Germany are the pioneers of modern Antarctic fishing industry.”

Ramorino Glacier

Ramorino Glacier (78°24′S 85°38′W) is the 4.5 nautical miles (8.3 km; 5.2 mi) long glacier situated northwest of upper Crosswell Glacier and southeast of Cervellati Glacier on the east slope of Sentinel Range in the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica. It flows northeastwards between Epperly Ridge and Shinn Ridge, and enters Crosswell Glacier northwest of Mount Segers. The feature was named by US-ACAN in 2006 after Maria Chiara Ramorino, manager of the Italian team that compiled and promulgated the SCAR Composite Gazetteer of Antarctica, 1998-2006.

Robert Glacier

Robert Glacier is the eastern of two glaciers in Kemp Land entering the southern part of Edward VIII Bay . It was seen by Robert Dovers and G. Schwartz in 1954 while carrying out a sledge journey and survey of Edward VIII Bay . The other (western) glacier is Wilma Glacier.

It was named by ANCA for Dovers, who was surveyor and officer in charge at Mawson Station in 1954. It is part of the Australian Antarctic Gazetteer and the SCAR Composite Gazetteer of Antarctica.

Rotalia Island

Rotalia Island (Bulgarian: остров Роталия, ‘Ostrov Rotalia’ \'os-trov ro-'ta-li-ya\) is the rocky island off the north coast of Nelson Island in the South Shetland Islands, Antarctica extending 310 m in southeast-northwest direction and 250 m in southwest-northeast direction.

The island is “named after the ocean fishing trawler Rotalia of the Bulgarian company Ocean Fisheries – Burgas whose ships operated in the waters of South Georgia, Kerguelen, the South Orkney Islands, South Shetland Islands and Antarctic Peninsula from 1970 to the early 1990s. The Bulgarian fishermen, along with those of the Soviet Union, Poland and East Germany are the pioneers of modern Antarctic fishing industry.”

UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee

The UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee (or UK-APC) is a United Kingdom government committee, part of the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, responsible for recommending names of geographical locations within the British Antarctic Territory (BAT) and the South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands (SGSSI). Such names are formally approved by the Commissioners of the BAT and SGSSI respectively, and published in the BAT Gazetteer and the SGSSI Gazetteer maintained by the Committee. The BAT names are also published in the international Composite Gazetteer of Antarctica maintained by SCAR.

The Committee may also consider proposals for new place names for geographical features in areas of Antarctica outside BAT and SGSSI, which are referred to other Antarctic place-naming authorities, or decided by the Committee itself if situated in the unclaimed sector of Antarctica.

Vyatskaya Peak

Vyatskaya Peak (71°57′S 13°32′E) is a peak, 2,455 m, on the north part of Skavlrimen Ridge in the Weyprecht Mountains, Queen Maud Land. Discovered and plotted from air photos by German Antarctic Expedition, 1938-39. Mapped from air photos and surveys by Norwegian Antarctic Expedition, 1956–60; remapped by Soviet Antarctic Expedition, 1960–61, and named presumedly after the Vyatka River. This name originates from United States of America. It is part of the United States Gazetteer and the SCAR Composite Gazetteer of Antarctica. This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Vyatskaya Peak" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

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