Community boards of Brooklyn

Community boards of Brooklyn are New York City community boards in the borough of Brooklyn, which are the appointed advisory groups of the community districts that advise on land use and zoning, participate in the city budget process, and address service delivery in their district.[1]

Community boards are each composed of up to 50 volunteer members appointed by the local borough president, half from nominations by City Council members representing the community district (i.e., whose council districts cover part of the community district).[2][3] Additionally, all City Council members representing the community district are non-voting, ex officio board members.[3]

New York City community districts
Map of community districts in the City of New York

Community boards

CB 1

Brooklyn Community Board 1 encompasses Flushing Avenue, Williamsburg, Greenpoint, Northside, and Southside. It is delimited by the Newtown Creek and Queens Borough line on the east, Flushing and Kent Avenue on the south, as well as by the East River on the west.

CB 2

Brooklyn Community Board 2 includes Brooklyn Heights, DUMBO, Vinegar Hill, Fulton Mall, Boerum Hill, Fort Greene, Brooklyn Navy Yard, Fulton Ferry, and Clinton Hill. It is delimited by East River on the west and the north, by Kent and Classon Avenues on the east, as well as by Atlantic Avenue, Pacific Street, 4th Avenue, Warren and Court Streets on the south.

CB 3

Brooklyn Community Board 3 includes Bedford-Stuyvesant, Stuyvesant Heights, and Ocean Hill. It is delimited by Classon Avenue on the west, Flushing Avenue, Broadway and Saratoga Avenue on the north, by Kent and Classon Avenues on the east, as well as by Atlantic Avenue on the south.

CB 4

Brooklyn Community Board 4 includes Bushwick and Ridgewood. It is delimited by Broadway on the west, Flushing Avenue on the north, the Queens Borough line and Vermont Avenue on the east, as well as by Highland Avenue on the south.

CB 5

Brooklyn Community Board 5 includes East New York, Cypress Hills, Highland Park, New Lots, City Line, and Starrett City. It is delimited by Van Sinderen Avenue on the west, the Queens Borough line on the north and on the east, as well as by the Gateway National Recreation Area, Louisiana and Stanley Avenue on the south.

CB 6

Brooklyn Community Board 6 includes Red Hook, Carroll Gardens, Park Slope, Gowanus, and Cobble Hill. It is delimited by Upper New York Bay and East River on the west, Atlantic Avenue, Court Street, 4th Avenue, Warren and Pacific Street on the north, Prospect Park on the east, as well as by the 15th Street and the Gowanus Canal on the south.

CB 7

Brooklyn Community Board 7 includes Sunset Park and Windsor Terrace. It is delimited by Gowanus Bay on the west, 15th Street and Prospect Park South West on the north, Caton Avenue, Fort Hamilton Parkway, 37th Street and 8th Avenue on the east, as well as by the Long Island Rail Road and Bay Ridge R.R. Yards on the south.

CB 8

Brooklyn Community Board 8 includes Crown Heights, Prospect Heights, and Weeksville. It is delimited by Flatbush Avenue on the west, Atlantic Avenue on the north, Ralph Avenue on the east, as well as by New York Avenue, Rochester Avenue and Eastern Parkway on the south.

CB 9

Brooklyn Community Board 9 includes Crown Heights, Prospect Lefferts Gardens, and Wingate. It is delimited by Ocean Avenue and Flatbush Avenue on the west, Eastern Parkway on the north, Rochester, East New York and Utica Avenues on the east, as well as by Clarkson Avenue on the south.

CB 10

Brooklyn Community Board 10 includes Bay Ridge, Dyker Heights, and Fort Hamilton. It is delimited by Upper New York Bay on the west, Bay Ridge R.R. Yards and Long Island Rail Road on the north, 14th Avenue and Bay 8th Avenue on the east, as well as by Lower New York Bay on the south.

CB 11

Brooklyn Community Board 11 includes Bath Beach, Gravesend, Mapleton, and Bensonhurst. It is delimited by Bay 8th Street and 14th Avenue on the west, 61st Street on the north, McDonald Avenue on the east, as well as by Avenue U and Gravesend Bay on the south.

CB 12

Brooklyn Community Board 12 includes Borough Park, Kensington, Ocean Parkway, and Midwood. It is delimited by 61st Street on the west, 8th Avenue, 37th Street and Caton Avenue on the north, Coney Island Avenue, 18th Avenue, McDonald Avenue and Long Island Rail Road on the east, as well as by Avenue P on the south.

CB 13

Brooklyn Community Board 13 includes Coney Island, Brighton Beach, Bensonhurst, Gravesend, and Seagate. It is delimited by Gravesend Bay on the west, 26th Avenue, 86th Street, Avenue Y on the north, Coney Island Avenue and Corbin Place on the east, as well as by Lower New York Bay on the south.

CB 14

Brooklyn Community Board 14 includes Flatbush, Midwood, Kensington, and Ocean Parkway. It is delimited by Coney Island Avenue, the Long Island Rail Road, McDonald Avenue, Avenue F and 18th Avenue on the west, Parkside Avenue on the north, Bedford Avenue, Foster Avenue and Nostrand Avenue on the east, as well as by Kings Highway and Avenue P on the south.

CB 15

Brooklyn Community Board 15 includes Sheepshead Bay, Manhattan Beach, Kings Bay, Gerritsen Beach, Kings Highway, East Gravesend, Madison, Homecrest, and Plum Beach. It is delimited by Corbin Place, Coney Island Avenue, Avenue Y, 86th street, Avenue U and McDonald Avenue, Avenue P and Kings Highway on the north, Nostrand avenue and Marine Park on the east, as well as by the Atlantic Ocean on the south.

CB 16

Brooklyn Community Board 16 includes Brownsville Ocean Hill, and a portion of Bedford-Stuyvesant. It is delimited by East 98th street, East New York Avenue, Ralph Avenue, Atlantic Avenue and Saratoga Avenue on the west, Broadway on the north, Van Sinderen Avenue on the east, as well as by the Long Island Rail Road on the south.

CB 17

Brooklyn Community Board 17 includes East Flatbush, Remsen Village, Farragut, Rugby, Erasmus and Ditmas Village. It is delimited by East 32nd street, Glenwood Road, Nostrand Avenue, Foster Avenue and Bedford Avenue on the west, Clarkson Avenue, Utica Avenue and East New York Avenue on the north, East 98th street on the east, as well as by the Long Island Rail Road on the south.

CB 18

Brooklyn Community Board 18 includes Canarsie, Bergen Beach, Mill Basin, Flatlands, Marine Park, Georgetown, and Mill Island. It is delimited by Nostrand Avenue on the west, the Long Island Rail Road on the north, Van Sinderen Avenue and Louisiana Avenue on the east, as well as by Shore Parkway on the south.

Other areas

Within the borough of Brooklyn there are two Joint Interest Areas (JIA), which are outside of the jurisdiction of individual community districts, and have their own district number.[4][5] The two JIAs in Kings county are:

See also

References

  1. ^ Berg, Bruce (2007). New York City Politics: Governing Gotham. Rutgers University Press. p. 277.
  2. ^ "About Community Boards". NYC Mayor's Community Affairs Unit. Retrieved 26 November 2016.
  3. ^ a b New York City Charter § 2800(a)
  4. ^ NYC Department of City Planning. "Joint Interest Areas and Sources & Disclaimer". www1.nyc.gov. Retrieved 21 March 2018.
  5. ^ "2010 Census Table G-1: 2010 Community District Geography Notes" (PDF). Retrieved 11 April 2018.
Brooklyn Community Board 1

Brooklyn Community Board 1 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Williamsburg and Greenpoint. It is delimited by the Newtown Creek and Queens Borough line on the east, Flushing and Kent Avenue on the south, and by the East River on the west.Its current chairman is Dealice Fuller, and its district manager is Gerald A. Esposito.

As of the United States Census, 2000, the Community Board had a population of 160,338, up from 155,972 in 1990 and 142,942 in 1980. Of them (as of 2000), 77,040 (48.0%) were White non-Hispanic, 8,808 (5.5%) were African-American, 5,730 (3.57%) were Asian or Pacific Islander, 192 (0.1%) were American Indian or Native Alaskan, 3,635 (2.3%) were of some other race, 4,488 (2.8%) were of two or more races, and 60,445 (37.7%) were Hispanic.

46.7% of the population benefit from public assistance as of 2004, up from 32.9% in 2000.

The land area is 3,167.6 acres (12.819 km2).

Brooklyn Community Board 10

Brooklyn Community Board 10 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Bay Ridge, Dyker Heights, and Fort Hamilton. It is delimited by Upper New York Bay on the west, Bay Ridge R.R. Yards and Long Island Rail Road on the north, 14th Avenue and Bay 8th Street on the east, as well as by Lower New York Bay on the south.

Its current chairman (2009) is Dean Rasinya, Vice Chair Mary Ann Walsh, Secretary Ron Gross, Treasurer Brian Kieran and its district manager Josephine Beckmann.

As of the United States Census, 2000, the Community Board has a population of 122,542, up from 110,612 in 1990 and 118,188 in 1980.

Of them (as of 2000), 84,120 (68.6%) are White non Hispanic, 1,402 (1.1%) are African-American, 17,546 (14.3%) Asian or Pacific Islander, 115 (0.1%) American Indian or Native Alaskan, 352 (0.3%) of some other race, 5,611 (4.6%) of two or more race, 13,396 (10.9%) of Hispanic origins.

22.7% of the population benefit from public assistance as of 2004, up from 10.9% in 2000.

The land area is 2,609.5 acres (10.560 km2).

Brooklyn Community Board 11

Brooklyn Community Board 11 is New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Bath Beach, Gravesend, Mapleton, and Bensonhurst. It is delimited by Bay 8th Street and 14th Avenue on the west, 61st Street on the north, McDonald Avenue on the east, as well as by Avenue U and Gravesend Bay on the south.

Its current chairman is William Guarinello, and its district manager Marnee Elias-Pavia.As of the 2010 United States Census, the Community Board has a population of 182,000 up from 172,129 in 2000. As of 2010 the population formed of, (44.2 %) White Non-Hispanic, (0.9 %) Black, (39.1 %) Asian, (1.5 %) Other Race, and (14.4 %) of Hispanic origin. With over 55.5% of the residents being foreign born.

During the previous census, the United States Census, 2000, the Community Board had a population of 172,129, up from 149,994 in 1990 and 155,073 in 1980.

Of them (as of 2000), 111,651 (64.9%) are White non Hispanic, 675 (0.4%) are African-American, 39,590 (23%) Asian or Pacific Islander, 125 (0.1%) American Indian or Native Alaskan, 282 (0.2%) of some other race, 1.362 (2.8%) of two or more race, 4,475 (8.8%) of Hispanic origins.

31.0% of the population benefit from public assistance as of 2004, up from 16.6% in 2000.

The land area is 2,517.4 acres (10.188 km2).

Brooklyn Community Board 12

Brooklyn Community Board 12 is New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Borough Park, Kensington, Ocean Parkway, and Midwood.

Brooklyn Community Board 13

Brooklyn Community Board 13 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Coney Island, Brighton Beach, Bensonhurst, Gravesend, and Seagate. It is delimited by Gravesend Bay on the west, 26th Avenue, 86th Street, Avenue Y on the north, Coney Island Avenue and Corbin Place on the east, as well as by Lower New York Bay on the south.

Its current chair is Joann Weiss, and its district manager is Eddie Mark.

As of the United States Census, 2000, the Community Board has a population of 106,120, up from 102,596 in 1990 and 100,030 in 1980.

Of them (as of 2000), 58,684 (55.3%) are White non Hispanic, 16,654 (15.7%) are African-American, 10,079 (9.5%) Asian or Pacific Islander, 191 (0.2%) American Indian or Native Alaskan, 304 (0.3%) of some other race, 2.955 (2.8%) of two or more race, 17,253 (16.3%) of Hispanic origins.

41.0% of the population benefit from public assistance as of 2004, up from 30.0% in 2000.

The land area is 2,198.0 acres (8.895 km2).

Brooklyn Community Board 14

Brooklyn Community Board 14 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Flatbush, Midwood, Kensington, and Ocean Parkway. It is delimited by Coney Island Avenue, the Long Island Rail Road, McDonald Avenue, Avenue F and 18th Avenue on the west, Parkside Avenue on the north, Bedford Avenue, Foster Avenue and Nostrand Avenue on the east, and Kings Highway and Avenue P on the south.

Its current chairman is Alvin M. Berk, and its district manager is Shawn Campbell.

As of the United States Census, 2000, the Community Board has a population of 168,806, up from 159,825 in 1990 and 143,859 in 1980. Of them (as of 2000), 60,268 (35.7%) are White non Hispanic, 66,211 (39.2%) are African-American, 13,155 (7.8%) Asian or Pacific Islander, 268 (0.2%) American Indian or Native Alaskan, 893 (0.5%) of some other race, 5,769 (3.4%) of two or more race, 22,242 (13.2%) of Hispanic origins. 36.8% of the population benefit from public assistance as of 2004, up from 21.6% in 2000.

The land area is 1,880.1 acres (7.608 km2).

Brooklyn Community Board 15

Brooklyn Community Board 15 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Gravesend, Sheepshead Bay, Manhattan Beach, Gerritsen Beach, Madison, Homecrest, and Plum Beach. It is delimited by Corbin Place, Coney Island Avenue, Avenue Y, 86th street, Avenue U and McDonald Avenue, Avenue P and Kings Highway on the north, Nostrand avenue and Marine Park on the east, as well as by the Atlantic Ocean on the south.

Its current chairman is Theresa Scavo. As of the United States Census, 2000, the Community Board has a population of 160,319, up from 143,477 in 1990 and 149,570 in 1980. Of them (as of 2000), 121,052 (75.5%) are White non Hispanic, 4,823 (3.0%) are African-American, 20,229 (12.6%) Asian or Pacific Islander, 123 (0.1%) American Indian or Native Alaskan, 340 (0.2%) of some other race, 3,506 (2.2%) of two or more race, 10,246 (6.4%) of Hispanic origins.

26.6% of the population benefit from public assistance as of 2004, up from 16.1% in 2000. The land area is 3,166.9 acres (12.816 km2).

Brooklyn Community Board 16

Brooklyn Community Board 16 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Brownsville and Ocean Hill. It is delimited by East 98th street, East New York Avenue, Ralph Avenue, Atlantic Avenue and Saratoga Avenue on the west, Broadway on the north, Van Sinderen Avenue on the east, as well as by the Long Island Rail Road on the south.

Its current Chairperson is Genese Morgan, and its District Manager Viola D. Greene-Walker. The Community Board #16's Office is located at 444 Thomas S. Boyland Street.

On a daily basis, the District Office staff monitors all complaints from community residents and works with the Mayor's Office, Borough President's Office, and City agencies to resolve local complaints; i.e., potholes, street light outages, water leaks, refuse collection, housing, heat and hot water complaints, demolition and seal-up of abandoned buildings, pest control, lot cleaning, human resources, and youth programs. The staff also follows-up on the business of the Board and its committees.

The District Manager convenes a District Service Cabinet composed of all local service agency chiefs within the confines of Community District #16. The Cabinet members interface with each other on specific projects in the district and follow up on individual complaints of the community. The Cabinet members provide invaluable assistance to the District Manager as it relates to the delivery of City services to the residents of Community District #16.

As of the United States Census, 2010, the Community Board has a population of 86,468, up from 85,343 in 2000 and 84,923 in 1990.

Of them (as of 2010), 858 (1.0%) are White non Hispanic, 65,930 (76.2%) are African-American, 620 (0.7%) Asian or Pacific Islander, 287 (0.3%) American Indian or Native Alaskan, 280 (0.3%) of some other race, 1,124 (1.3%) of two or more race, 17,369 (20.1%) of Hispanic origins. 55.2% of the population benefited from public assistance in 2012, including 31.9% who receive Medicaid only.

The land area is 1,230.6 acres (4.980 km2).

Brooklyn Community Board 17

Brooklyn Community Board 17 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of East Flatbush, Remsen Village, Farragut, Rugby, Erasmus and Ditmas Village. The District is delimited by East 32nd Street, Glenwood Road, Nostrand Avenue, Foster Avenue and Bedford Avenue on the west, Clarkson Avenue, Utica Avenue and East New York Avenue on the north, East 98th Street on the east, as well as by the Long Island Rail Road on the south.

The Board's current Chairman is Lloyd Mills, and the District Manager is Sherif Fraser.

As of the United States Census, 2000, District 17 has a population of 165,753, up from 161,261 in 1990 and 154,596 in 1980.

Of them (as of 2000), 2,577 (1.6%) are White non Hispanic, 146,506 (88.4%) are African-American, 1,709 (1.0%) Asian or Pacific Islander, 304 (0.2%) American Indian or Native Alaskan, 779 (0.5%) of some other race, 4,614 (2.8%) of two or more race, 9,264 (5.6%) of Hispanic origins.

32.6% of the population benefit from public assistance as of 2004, up from 17.6% in 2000.

The land area is 21,508.0 acres (87.040 km2).

Brooklyn Community Board 18

Brooklyn Community Board 18 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Canarsie, Bergen Beach, Mill Basin, Flatlands, Marine Park, Georgetown, and Mill Island. It is delimited by Nostrand Avenue on the west, the Long Island Rail Road on the north, Van Sinderen Avenue and Louisiana Avenue on the east, as well as by Shore Parkway on the south.

Its current chairman is Saul Needle, and its district manager Dorothy Turano.

As of the United States Census, 2000, the Community Board has a population of 194,653 up from 162,428 in 1990 and 169,093 in 1980.

Of them (as of 2000), 67,303 (34.6%) are White non Hispanic, 98,714 (50.7%) are African-American, 7,203 (3.7%) Asian or Pacific Islander, 254 (0.1%) American Indian or Native Alaskan, 854 (0.4%) of some other race, 4,469 (2.3%) of two or more race, 15,886 (8.2%) of Hispanic origins.

21.6% of the population benefit from public assistance as of 2004, up from 10.9% in 2000.The land area is 6,100.5 acres (24.688 km2).

Brooklyn Community Board 2

Brooklyn Community Board 2 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Downtown Brooklyn, Brooklyn Heights, DUMBO, Vinegar Hill, Fulton Mall, Boerum Hill, Fort Greene, Brooklyn Navy Yard, Fulton Ferry, and Clinton Hill. It is delimited by East River on the west and the north, by Kent and Classon Avenues on the east, and by Atlantic Avenue, Pacific Street, Fourth Avenue, Warren and Court Streets on the south.

As of the United States Census, 2000, the Community Board had a population of 98,620, up from 94,534 in 1990 and 92,732 in 1980. 39,916 (40.5%) residents were African-American, 33,931 (34.4%) were White non-Hispanic, 4,629 (4.7%) were Asian or Pacific Islander, 213 (0.2%) were American Indian or Native Alaskan, 473 (0.5%) were of some other race, 2,923 (3%) were of two or more races, and 16,535 (16.8%) were of Hispanic origins.

In 2004, 17.4% of the population benefited from public assistance, down from 22.5% in 2000.

The land area is 1,910.1 acres (7.730 km2).

Its current chair is Shirley McRae, and its district manager is Robert Perris.

Brooklyn Community Board 3

Brooklyn Community Board 3 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Bedford-Stuyvesant, Stuyvesant Heights and Ocean Hill. It is delimited by Classon Avenue on the west, Flushing Avenue and Broadway on the north, and Saratoga Avenue on the east, as well as by Atlantic Avenue on the south.

Its current chairman is Richard Flateau, and its district manager is Henry Butler.

As of the United States Census, 2000, the Community Board has a population of 143,387, up from 138,696 in 1990 and 133,377 in 1980.

Of them (as of 2000), 2,056 (1.4%) are White non-Hispanic, 110,431 (76.8%) are African-American, 1,457 (1.0%) Asian or Pacific Islander, 432(0.3%) American Indian or Native Alaskan, 473 (0.3%) of some other race, 2,998 (2.1%) of two or more race, 26,020 (18.1%) of Hispanic origins.

44.9% of the population benefit from public assistance as of 2004, up from 32.7% in 2000.

The land area is 1,894.4 acres (7.666 km2).

Brooklyn Community Board 4

Brooklyn Community Board 4 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhood of Bushwick. It is delimited by Broadway on the west, Flushing Avenue on the north, the Queens Borough line and Vermont Avenue on the east, as well as by Highland Avenue on the south.

Its current Chairperson is Mr. Robert Camacho, and the District Manager is Ms. Celeste Leon. Born and raised in the Bushwick Community Mr. Robert Camacho has been an advocate in the Bushwick Community for almost 30 years. As of the United States Census, 2000, the Community Board has a population of 104,358, up from 102,572 in 1990 and 92,497 in 1980.

Of them (as of 2000), 3,026 (2.9%) are White non Hispanic, 24,838 (23.8%) are African-American, 3,245 (3.1%) Asian or Pacific Islander, 300 (0.3%) American Indian or Native Alaskan, 787 (0.8%) of some other race, 2,020 (1.9%) of two or more race, 70,142 (67.2%) of Hispanic origins.

51.9% of the population benefit from public assistance as of 2004, up from 36.6% in 2000.

The land area is 1,311.2 acres (5.306 km2).

Brooklyn Community Board 5

Brooklyn Community Board 5 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of East New York, Cypress Hills, Highland Park, New Lots, City Line, Spring Creek, and Starrett City. It is delimited by Van Sinderen Avenue on the west, the Queens Borough line on the north and on the east, as well as by the Gateway National Recreation Area, Louisiana and Stanley Avenue on the south.

Its current chairman is Nathan Bradley, and its district manager is Walter Campbell.

As of the United States Census, 2000, the Community Board has a population of 173,198, up from 161,350 in 1990 and 154,932 in 1980.

Of them (as of 2000), 8,785 (5.1%) are White non Hispanic, 84,838 (49.0%) are African-American, 6,007 (3.5%) Asian or Pacific Islander, 733 (0.4%) American Indian or Native Alaskan, 2,251 (1.3%) of some other race, 5,272 (3.0%) of two or more race, 65,312 (37.7%) of Hispanic origins.

46.6% of the population benefit from public assistance as of 2004, up from 32.2% in 2000.

The land area is 3,612.7 acres (14.620 km2).

Brooklyn Community Board 6

Brooklyn Community Board 6 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Red Hook, Carroll Gardens, Park Slope, Gowanus, and Cobble Hill. It is delimited by Upper New York Bay and East River on the west, Atlantic Avenue, Court Street, Fourth Avenue, Warren and Pacific Streets on the north, Prospect Park on the east, as well as by the 15th Street, Hamilton Avenue and the Gowanus Canal on the south. It approximates the 19th century district of South Brooklyn.

Its current chairman is Peter D. Fleming and the District Manager is Michael Racioppo.

As of the United States Census, 2000, the Community Board has a population of 104,054, up from 102,724 in 1990 but down from 110,225 in 1980.

Of them (as of 2000), 57,106 (54.9%) are White non Hispanic, 14,034 (13.5%) are African-American, 4,622 (4.4%) Asian or Pacific Islander, 173 (0.2%) American Indian or Native Alaskan, 493(0.5%) of some other race, 3,274 (3.1%) of two or more race, 24,352 (23.4%) of Hispanic origins.

18.8% of the population benefit from public assistance as of 2004, up from 14.4% in 2000.

The land area is 2,226.4 acres (9.010 km2).

Brooklyn Community Board 7

Brooklyn Community Board 7 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Sunset Park, Windsor Terrace, Greenwood Heights and South Park Slope. It is delimited by Gowanus Bay on the west; by 15th Street and Prospect Park South West on the north; and by Caton Avenue, Fort Hamilton Parkway, 37th Street and 8th Avenue on the east, as well as by the Long Island Rail Road and Bay Ridge R.R. Yards on the south.

Its current chairman is Cesar Zuniga and its district manager is Jeremy Laufer.As of the United States Census, 2000, the Community Board has a population of 120,063, up from 102,553 in 1990 and 98,564 in 1980. Of them (as of 2000), 27,369 (22.8%) are White non Hispanic, 4,203 (3.5%) are African-American, 20,911 (17.4%) Asian or Pacific Islander, 258 (0.2%) American Indian or Native Alaskan, 668(0.6%) of some other race, 3,322 (2.8%) of two or more race, 63,332 (52.7%) of Hispanic origins. 40.7% of the population benefit from public assistance as of 2004, up from 23.0% in 2000. The land area is 2,709.3 acres (10.964 km2).

Brooklyn Community Board 8

Brooklyn Community Board 8 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Crown Heights, Prospect Heights, and Weeksville. It is delimited by Flatbush Avenue on the west, Atlantic Avenue on the north, Ralph Avenue on the east, and Eastern Parkway on the south.

Its current chairwoman is Nizjoni Granville, Robert Matthews is Chair Emeritus, and its district manager Michelle George.

Brooklyn Community Board 9

Brooklyn Community Board 9 is a New York City community board that encompasses the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Crown Heights, Prospect Lefferts Gardens, and Wingate. It is delimited by Ocean Avenue and Flatbush Avenue on the west, Eastern Parkway on the north, Rochester, East New York and Utica Avenues on the east, as well as by Clarkson Avenue on the south.

Its former acting chairperson Laura Imperiale, and district manager Pearl R. Miles. Miles were accused of "doing things without involving the community," per another community leader.As of the 2000 US Census, the Community Board oversaw a population of 104,014, down from 110,715 in 1990 but up from 96,667 in 1980.

Of them (as of 2000), 79,466 (76.4%) are African-American, 11,733 (11.3%) are White non Hispanic, 8,581 (8.2%) of Hispanic origins, 2,416 (2.3%) of two or more race, 819 (0.8%) Asian or Pacific Islander, 816 (0.8%) of some other race, and 183 (0.2%) American Indian or Native Alaskan,.

36.4% of the population benefit from public assistance as of 2004, up from 20.8% in 2000.

The land area is 1,002.7 acres (4.058 km2).

Community boards of New York City

The community boards of the New York City government are the appointed advisory groups of the community districts of the five boroughs. There are currently 59 community districts: twelve in Manhattan, twelve in the Bronx, eighteen in Brooklyn, fourteen in Queens, and three in Staten Island:

Community boards of Manhattan

Community boards of the Bronx

Community boards of Brooklyn

Community boards of Queens

Community boards of Staten IslandThey advise on land use and zoning, participate in the city budget process, and address service delivery in their district. Regarding land use they are only advisory and mostly serve as mobilizing institutions for communities opposed to specific projects. The City Charter also allows boards to submit their own plans for the development, growth, and improvement of their communities.Community boards are each composed of up to 50 volunteer members appointed by the local borough president, half from nominations by City Council members representing the community district (i.e., whose council districts cover part of the community district). Each community board is led by a district manager, with an office and staff, whose primary purpose is to coordinate the delivery of services to the community. Non-board members may also join or work on board committees. Each borough also has a borough board, composed of the borough president, council members from the borough, and the chairperson of each community board in the borough.

Manhattan
The Bronx
Brooklyn
Queens
Staten Island

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