Commander British Forces in Hong Kong

The Commander British Forces in Hong Kong (CBF) was a senior British Army officer who acted as Military Advisor to the Governor of Hong Kong and was in charge of the Hong Kong British Forces. The officeholder of this post concurrently assumed the office of the Lieutenant Governor of Hong Kong before the abolishment of the position.

Structure

The Governor of Hong Kong, being a representative of the British sovereign, was the Commander-in-Chief of the British Forces and Vice Admiral in the Crown colony (then British Dependent Territories).

The Governor was advised by the Commander British Forces in Hong Kong (CBF) on all military actions. During the 1980s and 1990s, the CBF was normally a career Major General or Lieutenant General from the British Army. Until 1966, the CBF was an ex officio member of the Legislative Council.[1]

Commanders

Commanders have included:[2][3]
Commander British Forces in Hong Kong

Commander British Troops in China and Hong Kong

Commander British Troops in China, Hong Kong, and the Straits Settlements

Commander British Troops in China and Hong Kong

Commander British Troops in South China

Commander British Troops in North China

  • 1900–1901 Major-General Sir Alfred Gaselee
  • 1901–1903 Major-General O'Moore Creagh
  • 1901–1906 Brigadier-General Francis Ventris[4] (major-general from October 1903[5])
  • 1906–1910 Brigadier-General Wallscourt Waters[6]
  • 1910–1914 Brigadier-General Edward Cooper[7]
  • 1914–1915 Brigadier-General Nathaniel Barnardiston[8] (major-general from February 1915[9])

Commander British Forces in China

Commander British Troops in South China

Commander British Troops in North China

Commander British Troops in China

Note from 1941 to 1945 Hong Kong was under Japanese control

Commander British Forces in Hong Kong

Residences

See also

References

  1. ^ Legislative Council
  2. ^ British and Indian armies on the China coast 1785–1985 by Harfield, A G, Published by A and J Partnership, 1990, Pages 483–484 ISBN 0-9516065-0-6
  3. ^ Army Commands Archived July 5, 2015, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "No. 27586". The London Gazette. 11 August 1903. p. 5074.
  5. ^ "No. 27627". The London Gazette. 18 December 1903. p. 8338.
  6. ^ "No. 27946". The London Gazette. 4 September 1906. p. 6015.
  7. ^ "No. 28392". The London Gazette. 5 July 1910. p. 4777.
  8. ^ "No. 28831". The London Gazette. 15 May 1914. p. 3927.
  9. ^ "No. 29074". The London Gazette (4th supplement). 18 February 1915. p. 1685.
Battle of Hong Kong

The Battle of Hong Kong (8–25 December 1941), also known as the Defence of Hong Kong and the Fall of Hong Kong, was one of the first battles of the Pacific War in World War II. On the same morning as the attack on Pearl Harbor, forces of the Empire of Japan attacked the British Crown colony of Hong Kong. The attack was in violation of international law as Japan had not declared war against the British Empire. The Hong Kong garrison consisted of British, Indian and Canadian units besides Chinese soldiers and conscripts from both within and outside Hong Kong.

Locations which played an important role in setting the pace of military operations during December 1941 include TaiPo Road, the Shing Mun Redoubt trench and tunnel complex in the Gin Drinkers' Line, Devil's Peak, Ma Lau Tong, Lyemun (also spelt as Lye Moon or Lei Yue Mun), North Point, Aldrich Bay (Quarry Bay), Shaukiwan, Saiwan Hill, Wong Nei Chong Gap (Wong Nai Chung Gap), Tytam (Tai Tam Gap & Reservoirs), Shouson Hill and Stanley Fort. Coastal defence batteries including those at Stonecutters Island, Pak Sha Wan, Lyemun fort, Saiwan, Mount Collinson, Mount Parker, Belchers, Mount Davis, Jubilee Hill, Bokara, and Stanley provided artillery support for ground operations till they were put out of action or surrendered.Within a week the defenders abandoned the mainland and less than two weeks later, with their position on the island untenable, the colony had raised the white flag of surrender.

Brian Reynolds (RAF officer)

Air Marshal Sir Brian Vernon Reynolds, (4 June 1902 – 6 December 1965) was a Royal Air Force officer who became Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief at RAF Coastal Command.

British Forces Overseas Hong Kong

British Forces Overseas Hong Kong comprised the elements of the British Army, Royal Navy (including Royal Marines) and Royal Air Force. The Governor of Hong Kong also assumed the position of the Commander-in-chief of the forces and the Commander British Forces in Hong Kong took charge of the daily deployment of the troops. Much of the British military left Hong Kong prior to the handover in 1997. The present article focuses mainly on the British garrison in Hong Kong in the post Second World War era. For more information concerning the British garrison during the Second World War see the Battle of Hong Kong.

Derek Bazalgette

Rear Admiral Derek Willoughby Bazalgette CB (22 July 1924 – 22 July 2007) was a Royal Navy officer who became President of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich.

Edwin Bramall

Field Marshal Edwin Noel Westby Bramall, Baron Bramall, (born 18 December 1923) is a retired senior British Army officer. He served as Chief of the General Staff, the professional head of the British Army, between 1979 and 1982, and as Chief of the Defence Staff, professional head of the British Armed Forces, from 1982 to 1985. He developed the concept of the "Fifth Pillar" pulling together the activities of defence attachés to form a structure for intervention in smaller countries.

Geoffrey Charles Evans

Lieutenant General Sir Geoffrey Charles Evans & Two Bars (13 January 1901 – 27 January 1987) was a senior British Army officer during World War II and the post-war era. He was highly regarded as both a staff and field officer and had the distinction of being awarded the Distinguished Service Order (DSO) on three separate occasions.

Governor of Hong Kong

The Governor of Hong Kong was the representative in Hong Kong of the British Crown from 1843 to 1997. In this capacity, the governor was president of the Executive Council and Commander-in-Chief of the British Forces Overseas Hong Kong. The governor's roles were defined in the Hong Kong Letters Patent and Royal Instructions. Upon the end of British rule and the transfer of Hong Kong to the People's Republic of China in 1997, most of the civil functions of this office went to the Chief Executive of Hong Kong, and military functions went to the Commander of the People's Liberation Army Hong Kong Garrison.

Headquarters House (Hong Kong)

The Headquarters House, located at 11 Barker Road in Hong Kong was the residence of the Commander British Forces in Hong Kong from 1978 to 1997. It had replaced the old Headquarter House or Flagstaff House.

A private road from Barker Road was used to access the home for those who had the required security clearance. Today the Commander of the People's Liberation Army Hong Kong Garrison resides there. Nearby are two other official residences, namely the one for the Chief Secretary for Administration at 15 Barker Road, and the one for Secretary for Justice at 19 Severn Road.

Hong Kong order of precedence

The Hong Kong order of precedence is a nominal and symbolic hierarchy of important positions within the Government of Hong Kong. Administered by the government's Protocol Division, the hierarchy does not determine the order of succession for the office of Chief Executive, which is instead specified by the Basic Law of Hong Kong.

As a special administrative region of the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong maintains autonomy on all affairs other than defence and foreign relations. Reflecting that status, the order of precedence does not include state and party leaders of the Central People's Government. Government officials from mainland China are generally treated as special guests when attending Hong Kong government functions.

John Chapple (British Army officer)

Field Marshal Sir John Lyon Chapple, (born 27 May 1931) was a career British Army officer in the second half of the 20th century. He served as Chief of the General Staff, the professional head of the British Army, from 1988 to 1992. Early in his early military career he saw action during the Malayan Emergency and again during the Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation and later in his career he provided advice to the British Government during the Gulf War.

Lieutenant Governor of Hong Kong

The Lieutenant Governor of Hong Kong (Chinese: 香港副總督) held the second-highest position during the British colonial rule in Hong Kong from 1843 to 1902.

Talavera Vernon Anson

Admiral Talavera Vernon Anson (26 November 1809 – 8 September 1895) was a Royal Navy officer who took part in the Greek War of Independence and the First Opium War.

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