Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy

The Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy (Russian: Главнокомандующего ВМФ) is the chief commanding authority of the Russian Navy. He is appointed by the President of Russia. The position dates to the period of the Russian Empire. The current Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy is Admiral Nikolai Yevmenov.

Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy
Главнокомандующего ВМФ
Flag of Russia's Commander-in-Chief of the Navy
Flag of the Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy
Nikolaj Evmenov, 2016
Incumbent
Nikolai Yevmenov

since May 2019
 Russian Navy
Member ofGeneral Staff of the Armed Forces
Reports toChief of the General Staff
AppointerPresident of Russia
Formation8 September 1802 (historical)
19 August 1992 (current form)
WebsiteOfficial website
Navies of Russia

Tsardom of Russia

Russian Empire

Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

Russian Federation

List of Commanders

Ministers of Sea Forces (1802–1815)

Minister Took office Left office Time in office
1
Nikolay Mordvinov
Count
Nikolay Mordvinov
(1754–1845)
8 September 180228 December 1802111 days
2
Pavel Chichagov
Pavel Chichagov
(1767–1849)
31 December 180228 November 18118 years, 332 days
3
Ivan de Traverse
Ivan de Traverse
(1754–1831)
28 November 181117 December 18154 years, 19 days

Ministers of the Navy (1815–1917)

On 17 December 1815 the Ministry of Sea Forces was renamed, becoming the Ministry of the Navy.

Minister of the Navy Took office Left office Time in office
1
Ivan de Traverse
Ivan de Traverse
(1754–1831)
17 December 181524 March 182812 years, 98 days
2
Anton Otto von Möller [ru]
Admiral
Anton Otto von Möller
(1764–1848)
24 March 18285 February 18367 years, 318 days
3
Prince Alexander Menshikov
Admiral
Prince Alexander Menshikov
(1787–1869)
5 February 183623 February 185519 years, 18 days
4
Baron Ferdinand von Wrangel
Admiral
Baron Ferdinand von Wrangel
(1797–1870)
18 May 185527 July 18572 years, 70 days
5
Nikolay Metlin [ru]
Admiral
Nikolay Metlin
(1804–1884)
27 July 185718 September 18603 years, 53 days
6
Nikolay Karlovich Krabbe
Admiral
Nikolay Karlovich Krabbe
(1814–1876)
19 September 18603 January 1876 †15 years, 106 days
7
Stepan Lesovskiy [ru]
Admiral
Stepan Lesovskiy
(1817–1884)
12 January 187623 June 18804 years, 163 days
8
Aleksey Peschurov [ru]
Vice admiral
Aleksey Peschurov
(1834–1891)
23 June 188011 January 18821 year, 202 days
9
Ivan Shestakov
Admiral
Ivan Shestakov
(1820–1888)
11 January 188221 November 18886 years, 315 days
10
Nikolai Tchikhatchev [ru]
Admiral
Nikolai Tchikhatchev
(1830–1917)
28 November 188813 July 18967 years, 228 days
11
Pavel Petrovitch Tyrtov [ru]
Admiral
Pavel Petrovitch Tyrtov
(1836–1903)
13 July 18964 March 1903 †6 years, 234 days
12
Theodor Avellan
Admiral
Theodor Avellan
(1839–1916)
10 March 190329 June 19052 years, 117 days
13
Aleksei Birilev
Admiral
Aleksei Birilev
(1844–1915)
29 June 190511 January 19071 year, 196 days
14
Ivan Mikhaïlovitch Dikov [ru]
Admiral
Ivan Mikhaïlovitch Dikov
(1833–1914)
11 January 19078 January 19091 year, 363 days
15
Stepan Voevodskiy [ru]
Admiral
Stepan Voevodskiy
(1859–1937)
8 January 190918 March 19112 years, 69 days
16
Ivan Grigorovich
Admiral
Ivan Grigorovich
(1853–1930)
19 March 191128 February 19175 years, 346 days
17
Alexander Guchkov
Alexander Guchkov
(1862–1936)
1 March 191730 April 191760 days

Commanders of Naval Forces of the RSFSR (1918–1921)

Commander Took office Left office Time in office
1
Vasiliy Altfater
Vasiliy Altfater
(1883–1919)
[a]
15 October 191822 April 1919189 days
2
Yevgeny Berens
Yevgeny Berens
(1876–1928)
24 April 19195 February 1920287 days
3
Aleksandr Nemits
Aleksandr Nemits
(1879–1967)
5 February 192022 November 19211 year, 290 days

Commanders of the White Movement Fleet (1917–1924)

Commander Took office Left office Time in office
1
Pyotr Wrangel
Pyotr Wrangel
(1878–1928)
???
2
Mikhail Alexandrovich Kedrov
Rear Admiral
Mikhail Alexandrovich Kedrov
(1878–1945)
?November 1920?
3
Mikhail Berens
Rear Admiral
Mikhail Berens
(1879–1943)
November 192029 October 19243 years, 11 months

Commander-in-Chief's Assistant for Naval Affairs (1921–1924)

Commander-in-Chief Took office Left office Time in office
1
Eduard Pantserzhanskiy
Eduard Pantserzhanskiy
(1887–1937)
22 November 19219 December 19243 years, 17 days

Commanders-in-Chief of the Naval Forces of the USSR (1924–1937)

Commander-in-Chief Took office Left office Time in office
1
Vyacheslav Zof
Vyacheslav Zof
(1889–1937)
9 December 192423 August 19261 year, 257 days
2
Romuald Muklevich
Romuald Muklevich
(1890–1938)
23 August 192611 June 19314 years, 292 days
3
Vladimir Mitrofanovich Orlov
Fleet Flag-officer 1st Rank
Vladimir Mitrofanovich Orlov
(1895–1938)
11 June 193115 August 19376 years, 65 days
-
Lev Galler
Fleet Flag-officer 2nd Rank
Lev Galler
(1883–1950)
Acting
10 July 193715 August 193736 days
4
Mikhail Viktorov
Fleet Flag-officer 1st Rank
Mikhail Viktorov
(1893–1938)
15 August 193730 December 1937137 days

People's Commissars for the USSR Navy (1937–1939)

People's Commissar Took office Left office Time in office
1
Pyotr Smirnov
Army Commissar 1st Rank
Pyotr Smirnov
(1897–1939)
30 December 19375 November 1938310 days
2
Mikhail Frinovskiy
Army Commander 1st Rank
Mikhail Frinovskiy
(1898–1940)
5 November 193820 March 1939135 days
3
Nikolai Gerasimovich Kuznetsov
Fleet Flag-officer 2nd Rank
Nikolai Gerasimovich Kuznetsov
(1904–1974)
27 April 193924 July 193988 days

Commanders-in-Chief of the Soviet Navy (1939–1991)

Commander-in-Chief Took office Left office Time in office
1
Nikolai Gerasimovich Kuznetsov
Admiral of the Fleet
Nikolai Gerasimovich Kuznetsov
(1904–1974)
24 July 193917 January 19477 years, 177 days
2
Ivan Stepanovich Yumashev
Admiral
Ivan Stepanovich Yumashev
(1895–1972)
17 January 194720 July 19514 years, 184 days
(1)
Nikolai Gerasimovich Kuznetsov
Fleet Admiral of the Soviet Union
Nikolai Gerasimovich Kuznetsov
(1904–1974)
20 July 19515 January 19564 years, 169 days
3
Sergey Georgyevich Gorshkov
Fleet Admiral of the Soviet Union
Sergey Georgyevich Gorshkov
(1910–1988)
5 January 19568 December 198529 years, 337 days
4
Vladimir Chernavin
Fleet admiral
Vladimir Chernavin
(born 1928)
8 December 198525 December 19916 years, 18 days

Commander-in-Chief of the Commonwealth of Independent States Navy (1991–1992)

Commander-in-Chief Took office Left office Time in office
1
Vladimir Chernavin
Fleet admiral
Vladimir Chernavin
(born 1928)
25 December 199119 August 1992237 days

Commanders-in-Chief of the Russian Navy (1992–present)

Commander-in-Chief Took office Left office Time in office
1
Feliks Gromov
Fleet admiral
Feliks Gromov
(born 1937)
19 August 19927 November 19975 years, 80 days
2
Vladimir Kuroyedov
Fleet admiral
Vladimir Kuroyedov
(born 1944)
7 November 19974 September 20057 years, 301 days
3
Vladimir Masorin
Fleet admiral
Vladimir Masorin
(born 1947)
4 September 200527 August 20071 year, 357 days
4
Vladimir Vysotsky
Admiral
Vladimir Vysotsky
(born 1954)
27 August 20076 May 20124 years, 253 days
5
Viktor Chirkov
Admiral
Viktor Chirkov
(born 1959)
6 May 201226 February 20163 years, 296 days
6
Vladimir Korolyov
Admiral
Vladimir Korolyov
(born 1955)
18 April 20163 May 20193 years, 46 days
7
Nikolai Yevmenov
Admiral
Nikolai Yevmenov
(born 1962)
3 May 2019Incumbent108 days

Notes

  1. ^ Military ranks were abolished in 1918–1935.

External links

Admiral Gorshkov-class frigate

The Admiral Gorshkov-class, Russian designation Project 22350, is the newest class of frigates being built by the Severnaya Verf in Saint Petersburg for the Russian Navy. The class was designed by the Severnoye Design Bureau and incorporates use of stealth technology. So far, six vessels of the class have been ordered and scheduled for delivery by 2025. The lead ship of the class, Admiral Gorshkov, was commissioned on 28 July 2018.

Aleksandr Alekseyevich Moiseyev

Aleksandr Alekseyevich Moiseyev (Russian: Александр Алексеевич Моисеев; born 16 April 1962) is an officer of the Russian Navy. He currently holds the rank of vice admiral, and is commander in chief of the Northern Fleet.

After initially training in film repair, Moiseyev underwent military service, before studying at the navy's technical institute. From there he joined the Northern Fleet as a submariner. After starting in the engineering branch, he moved into specialising in combat and warfare control. Commended for his service and promoted, he took command of his own boat, from which he performed the first commercial space launch in the navy's history, as well as the first commercial payload that had ever been sent into orbit from a submarine. He undertook further study at the Naval Academy and the Military Academy of the General Staff, interspersed with the command of submarine squadrons. He received plaudits for his supervisory roles, and was awarded the title of Hero of the Russian Federation in 2011.

In 2018 he took command of the Black Sea Fleet, and oversaw a period of expansion within the fleet. He has also courted controversy with regards to relations with Ukraine following the Russian military intervention in Ukraine from 2014 onwards, and the Kerch Strait incident in November 2018. In May 2019 he was appointed commander of the Northern Fleet.

Feliks

Feliks is a given name which may refer to:

Feliks Gromov (born 1937), former Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy

Feliks Kibbermann, Estonian chess master

Feliks Kon (1864–1941), Polish communist activist

Feliks Konarski (1907–1991), Polish poet, songwriter and cabaret performer

Feliks Kazimierz Potocki (1630–1702), Polish noble, magnate and military leader

Feliks Stamm (1901–1976), Polish boxing coach

Feliks Topolski (1907–1989), Polish-born British expressionist painter

Feliks Zamoyski (died 1535), Polish nobleman

Feliks Zemdegs, Australian Rubik's Cube speedcuber

Feliks Gromov

Fleet Admiral Feliks Nikolayevich Gromov (Russian: Феликс Николаевич Громов; born August 29, 1937, Vladivostok) is a former Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy. Gromov is married and has a daughter and a son[1].

Gromov was born in Vladivostok and joined the navy in 1955. He completed the S.O. Makarov Pacific Higher Naval School in 1959. He served as an officer on a destroyer and in 1961 served in the strategic missile troops on an exchange programme. Gromov returned to the navy in 1962 and served on the Sverdlov class cruiser Admiral Senyavin and the Kotlin class destroyer Vdokhnovennyy. He subsequently commanded the cruisers Senyavin and the Dmitriy Pozharsky.

In 1977 Gromov became commander of a squadron of surface ships in the Baltic Fleet and was transferred to the Soviet Northern Fleet in 1982. In 1984 he became deputy commander of the Soviet Northern Fleet and was promoted to its commander in 1988.

In 1992 Gromov was given command of the Russian Navy following the dissolution of the Soviet Union. He was promoted to Admiral of the Fleet by Boris Yeltsin in 1996 and retired in 1997 at age 60, the mandated retirement age for Admirals and Fleet Admirals.

The Jamestown Foundation speculated that Gromov was dismissed because of a Russian Pacific Fleet ammunition explosion which seems to have attracted wide attention.

List of Russian admirals

This list of Russian admirals includes the admirals of all ranks, serving in the Russian Imperial Navy, the Soviet Navy and the modern Russian Navy.

See also the categories Category:Imperial Russian Navy admirals and Category:Soviet admirals.

Navy Day (Russia)

Day of the Russian Navy (Russian: День Военно-Морского Флота) is national holiday in the Russian Federation and a senior holiday in the Russian Armed Forces. The day honors the sailors in units of the Russian Navy and its specialized arms (Naval Aviation and the Coastal Troops consisting of the Naval Infantry and the Coastal Missile and Artillery Troops). It is celebrated annually, on the last Sunday of July.

Nikolai Yevmenov

Nikolai Anatolyevich Yevmenov (Russian: Николай Анатольевич Евменов) (born 2 April 1962) is an officer of the Russian Navy. He holds the rank of admiral, and is the current commander in chief of the Navy.

Order of Naval Merit (Russia)

The Order "For Naval Merit" (Russian: Орден «За морские заслуги») is a state decoration of the Russian Federation bestowed for excellence in military or economic maritime endeavours. It was established on February 27, 2002 by Decree of the President of the Russian Federation № 245. Its statute was amended by presidential decree № 1099 of September 7, 2010.

Russian Navy

The Russian Navy (Russian: Военно-морской флот Российской Федерации (ВМФ России), lit. Military-Maritime Fleet of the Russian Federation) is the naval arm of the Russian Armed Forces. It has existed in various forms since 1696, the present iteration of which was formed in January 1992 when it succeeded the Navy of the Commonwealth of Independent States (which had itself succeeded the Soviet Navy following the dissolution of the Soviet Union in late December 1991).

The first iteration of the Russian Navy was established by Peter the Great (Peter I) in October 1696. Ascribed to him is the oft quoted statement: "A ruler that has but an army has one hand, but he who has a navy has both." The symbols of the Russian Navy, the St. Andrew's ensign (seen to the right), and most of its traditions were established personally by Peter I.

Neither Jane's Fighting Ships nor the International Institute for Strategic Studies list any standard ship prefixes for the vessels of the Russian Navy. The U.S. government sometimes uses the exonymous prefix "RFS" (for "Russian Federation Ship"). However, the Russian Navy itself does not use this convention.

The Russian Navy possesses the vast majority of the former Soviet naval forces, and currently comprises the Northern Fleet, the Russian Pacific Fleet, the Russian Black Sea Fleet, the Russian Baltic Fleet, the Russian Caspian Flotilla, Naval Aviation, and the Coastal Troops (consisting of the naval infantry and the Coastal Missile and Artillery Troops).

A rearmament program approved in 2007 placed the development of the navy on an equal footing with the strategic nuclear forces for the first time in Soviet and Russian history. This program, covering the period until 2015, expected to see the replacement of 45 percent of the inventory of the Russian Navy. Out of 4.9 trillion rubles ($192.16 billion) allocated for military rearmament, 25 percent will go into building new ships. "We are already building practically as many ships as we did in Soviet times," First Deputy Prime Minister Sergei Ivanov said during a visit to Severodvinsk in July 2007, "The problem now is not lack of money, but how to optimize production so that the navy can get new ships three, not five, years after laying them down."The Russian Navy suffered severely since the dissolution of the Soviet Union due to insufficient maintenance, lack of funding and subsequent effects on the training of personnel and timely replacement of equipment. Another setback is attributed to Russia's domestic shipbuilding industry which is reported to have been in decline as to their capabilities of constructing contemporary hardware efficiently. Some analysts even say that because of this Russia's naval capabilities have been facing a slow but certain "irreversible collapse". Some analysts say that the recent rise in gas and oil prices has enabled a sort of renaissance of the Russian Navy due to increased available funds, which may allow Russia to begin "developing the capacity to modernize". In August 2014, Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu said that Russian naval capabilities would be bolstered with new weapons and equipment within the next six years in response to NATO deployments in eastern Europe and recent developments in Ukraine.

Russian aircraft carrier Admiral Kuznetsov

Admiral Flota Sovetskogo Soyuza Kuznetsov (Russian: Адмира́л фло́та Сове́тского Сою́за Кузнецо́в "Admiral of the Fleet of the Soviet Union Kuznetsov") is an aircraft carrier (heavy aircraft cruiser in Russian classification) serving as the flagship of the Russian Navy. It was built by the Black Sea Shipyard, the sole manufacturer of Soviet aircraft carriers, in Nikolayev within the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR). The initial name of the ship was Riga; it was launched as Leonid Brezhnev, embarked on sea trials as Tbilisi, and finally named Admiral Flota Sovetskogo Soyuza Kuznetsov after Admiral of the fleet of the Soviet Union Nikolay Gerasimovich Kuznetsov.It was originally commissioned in the Soviet Navy, and was intended to be the lead ship of the two-ship Kuznetsov class. However, its sister ship Varyag was still incomplete when the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991. The second hull was eventually sold by Ukraine to the People's Republic of China, completed in Dalian and commissioned as Liaoning.

Russian submarine Losharik

Project 210, Project 10831 or AS-31 (Russian: АС-31), nicknamed Losharik (Russian: Лошарик, IPA: [lɐˈʂarʲɪk]), is a Russian deep-diving submarine. On 1 July 2019, a fire broke out on the vessel while it was taking underwater measurements of the sea floor in Russian territorial waters.

"АС" stands for "Атомная Станция" from the Russian naval term "атомная глубоководная станция", "nuclear deepwater station". The submarine is also known as AS-12, but this number is assigned to another ship.

Ukrainian Navy

The Ukrainian Naval Forces (Ukrainian: Військово-Морські Сили України, ВМСУ, Viys’kovo-Mors’ki Syly Ukrayiny, VMSU) is the navy of Ukraine and part of the Armed Forces of Ukraine.

It consists of five branches: surface forces, submarine forces, Navy aviation, coastal rocket-artillery and naval infantry. The Navy numbers 6,500 people. In 2007 and prior to the 2014 Russian annexation of Crimea 15,470 people served the Ukrainian Navy.The headquarters of the Ukrainian Naval Forces was, until the 2014 Crimean crisis, located at Sevastopol in Crimea. The Naval Forces of Ukraine were highly affected by the Crimea Crisis as majority of their units were stationed there. Ships that did not escape or were not deployed at the time lowered their flags and were interned. Russia began a process of returning the vessels but stopped, citing inability of Ukraine to retake possession and continued violence against Russians in the Donbass. The ships that were returned were the older models of the fleet that were deemed obsolete. For example, Russia chose not to return the corvettes Ternopil and Lutsk, both of which are some of the newest ships of the Ukrainian fleet. However, none of the Ukrainian naval units retained were absorbed into the Russian Navy.

Ukraine had been scheduling to rebuild its naval forces since 2005 by building the domestic project 58250, the first Ukrainian designed and built corvette, as well as ordering numerous patrol boats in 2013 from Willard Marine. Ukraine has also restarted the production of its Gryuza River Armed Artillery Boat, which has been previously exported to Uzbekistan.The navy operates in the Black Sea basin (including Sea of Azov and Danube Delta). Distant operations of the Ukrainian Navy are limited to multinational activities, such as Operation Active Endeavour and Operation Atalanta in the Mediterranean and Horn of Africa. It is unknown whether these operations are funded by Ukraine.

Viktor Bursuk

Vice Admiral Viktor Bursuk is the deputy commander-in-chief of the Russian navy.

Viktor Chirkov

Viktor Viktorovich Chirkov (Russian: Виктор Викторович Чирков; born 8 September 1959, in Alma-Ata, Kazakh SSR) is a Russian admiral and the former commander of the Baltic Fleet. On 6 May 2012, he was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy, succeeding Vladimir Vysotsky, who had occupied the post for almost five years. He retired from his position due to health reasons in March 2016.

Vladimir Kasatonov

Vladimir Afanasyevich Kasatonov (Russian: Владимир Афанасьевич Касатонов) (21 July 1910 – 9 June 1989) was a Soviet military leader, fleet admiral, and Hero of the Soviet Union (25 November 1966).

Kasatonov finished the M.V. Frunze Higher Naval School in 1931 and served in the Baltic Fleet as a submariner. During the early part of World War II he was Chief of Staff of the Baltic Fleet's submarine division. Later in the war he joined the Naval General Staff, Operations Division.

In 1949 he was Deputy Commander of the Pacific Fleet, In 1953 he was Commander of the Baltic Fleet and in 1955 he became Commander of the Black Sea Fleet. In 1962 he became Commander of the Northern Fleet. In 1964 he became Deputy Commander-in-Chief of the Soviet Navy.

In 1974 Kasatonov became a member of the Chief Inspectorate of the Ministry of Defense and served in the Supreme Soviet. He died in Moscow and is buried in the Novodevichy Cemetery.

Vladimir Kasatonov was awarded three Orders of Lenin, the Order of the Red Banner, the Order of Nakhimov (2nd Class), the Order of the Patriotic War (1st Class), two Orders of the Red Star, two Orders of the Red Banner of Labour and numerous medals.

Vladimir Kasatonov's son, Igor Vladimirovich Kasatonov followed in his father's footsteps, holding virtually all of his father's positions. He retired as 1st Deputy Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy.

Vladimir Korolyov

Vladimir Ivanovich Korolyov (Russian: Влади́мир Ива́нович Королёв; born 1 February 1955 is a Russian Admiral. He is the former commander in chief of the Russian Navy.

Vladimir Kuroyedov

Fleet Admiral Vladimir Ivanovich Kuroyedov (Russian: Владимир Иванович Куроедов; born 5 September 1944) is a former longest-serving Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy. Earlier he was Chief of Staff/1st Deputy Commander of the Baltic Fleet, Chief of Staff/1st Deputy Commander of the Pacific Fleet since 1993 and Chief of the Main Staff/1st Deputy Commander-in-Chief of the Navy. Kuroyedov graduated from the Pacific S.O. Makarov Higher Naval School, the N.G. Kuznetsov Naval Academy and the General Staff Academy.

Kuroyedov joined the navy in 1962, graduating from the S.O. Makarov Pacific Higher Naval School in 1967. He served aboard frigates in the Pacific Fleet. In 1976–78 he studied at the Grechko (now Kuznetsov) Naval Academy graduating with distinction. From 1979 to 1987 he served in the Pacific Fleet commanding a division of minesweepers and was Chief of Staff of the Sakhalin Flotilla. From 1987 to 1989 he studied at the Voroshilov General Staff Academy graduating with the gold medal and was promoted to Rear Admiral.

In 1993 he became Chief of Staff of the Baltic Fleet and became Commander of the Pacific Fleet in 1994. He became Chief of the Main Navy Staff in 1997 and was promoted to Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy in November 1997. Kuroyedov was promoted to Fleet Admiral in February 2000. Kuroyedov tendered his resignation in the wake of the Kursk submarine disaster but his resignation was refused.

He was retired one day before his 61st birthday in 2005, mandatory retirement age for Russian senior officers being 60 (though the President can extend their service tenure in one year increments until 64).

Conflicting views on Kuroyedov's retirement speculate either that he was fired because he had presided over too many naval embarrassments, including the sinking of Kursk or because the President wished to emphasize the need for greater discipline in the Navy.

Vladimir Masorin

Admiral of the Fleet Vladimir Vasilyevich Masorin (Russian: Владимир Васильевич Масорин) (born August 24, 1947) is a retired Russian admiral who commanded the Caspian Flotilla in 1996–2002 and the Black Sea Fleet in 2002–2005. In September 2005, he was appointed the Commander-in-chief of the Russian Navy.

The newspaper Kommersant speculated that Admiral Masorin was a temporary appointment until the new Chief of the Main Naval Staff, appointed at the same time, took command of the Navy.

Masorin completed the P.S. Nakhimov Black Sea Higher Naval School in 1970. He served as principal warfare officer on the Kashin class destroyer Smyshleny of the Northern Fleet. In 1977 he completed additional officer training and became executive officer of the Kashin class destroyer Ognevoy. In 1980 he became commanding officer of the Sovremennyy class destroyer Otchayannyy and in 1983 Masorin became chief of staff of the Northern Fleet's destroyer squadron. After completing the N. G. Kuznetsov Naval Academy Masorin was promoted to commander of the Northern Fleet's destroyer squadron.

Following completion of the General Staff Academy, Masorin was promoted to commander of the Caspian Flotilla in 1996 and the Black Sea Fleet in 2002. Masorin was promoted to commander-in-chief of the Russian Navy and to the rank of fleet admiral in 2005.

On August 24, 2007, Masorin became the first Russian recipient of the Legion of Merit (Commander) from the United States. His award was conferred by U.S. Navy Chief of Naval Operations Michael Mullen, for meritorious conduct to increase cooperation and interoperability with the U.S. Navy and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization from September 2005 to August 2007. Under his leadership the Russian Federation's navy participated in Active Endeavor, a NATO maritime counter-terrorism operation in the Mediterranean Sea. He consistently advocated continued Russian participation in the joint and combined military exercises including BALTOPS, Northern Eagle FRUKUS and Pacific Eagle.

His visit to Washington, D.C. during which he received the Legion of Merit was first official visit of a Russian Federation Navy Commander-in-Chief in eleven years. His predecessors as Russian Navy Commander-in-Chief previously making official visits to Washington were Fleet Admirals Vladimir Chernavin and Felix Gromov.

Fleet Admiral Masorin retired in late 2007 after reaching his 60th birthday.

Masorin remains as advisor on the staff of the Russian Minister of Defense. He is married with two sons.

Vladimir Vysotskiy (admiral)

Vladimir Sergeyevich Vysotskiy Russian: Владимир Серге́евич Высоцкий, Ukrainian: Володимир Сергійович Висоцький Volodymyr Serhiyovych Vysotskiy; (born 18 August 1954 in Komarno, Lviv Oblast, Ukrainian SSR) is a Russian admiral and former Commander of the Russian Northern Fleet. On 12 September 2007, Vysotskiy was appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy, succeeding Vladimir Masorin who retired at age 60 the same day.Vysotskiy joined the Navy and graduated from the P.S. Nakhimov Black Sea Higher Naval School in Sevastopol in 1976. He was posted to the Russian Pacific Fleet where he served aboard patrol ships, frigates and the Sverdlov class cruiser Admiral Senyavin. In 1982 Vysotskiy completed the Advanced Officers Courses and was made Executive Officer of the Soviet aircraft carrier Minsk.

In 1990 Vysotskiy was a Gold Medal graduate of the N.G. Kuznetsov Naval Academy and posted as commanding officer of the Soviet aircraft carrier Minsk. Subsequently, he commanded a squadron of Pacific Fleet missile ships. In 1999 he was a Gold Medal graduate of the General Staff Academy and appointed Chief of Staff and then Commander of the Russian Northern Fleet combined forces surface flotilla. In 2004 he was appointed Chief of Staff of the Baltic Fleet. In 2005 he was appointed Commander of the Northern Fleet and in 2007 Commander-in-Chief of the Russian Navy. In May 2012 he was succeeded as Commander-in-Chief by Admiral Viktor Chirkov.

Vysotskiy is married with two children.

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