Comedy-drama

Comedy-drama or dramedy (a portmanteau of drama and comedy), is a genre in film and in television works in which plot elements are a combination of comedy and drama.[1][2] It is a subgenre of contemporary tragicomedy.[3][4] Comedy-drama is especially found in television programs and is considered a "hybrid genre".[5][6]

Nuvola 2.0+ Drama
Comedy and Drama
When the two are combined, a comedy-drama is created.

History

The advent of radio drama, cinema and in particular, television created greater pressure in marketing to clearly define a product as either comedy or drama. While in live theatre the difference became less and less significant, in mass media comedy and drama were clearly divided. Comedies were expected to keep a consistently light tone and not challenge the viewer by introducing more serious content.

By the early 1960s, television companies commonly presented half-hour-long "comedy" series or hour-long "dramas". Half-hour series were mostly restricted to situation comedy (sitcoms) or family comedy and were usually aired with either a live or overdubbed laugh track. One-hour dramas included such shows as police and detective series, westerns, science fiction, and serialized prime time soap operas.

Arguably, one of the first American television shows to successfully blend elements of comedy and drama together was Jackie Cooper's military-themed series, Hennesey. Although the show featured a laugh track, it also contains many elements of character drama that occurred amongst the re-occurring characters and the guest stars. The laugh track was not extensively used in each episode; by the third season, it was eliminated completely from the series.

While sitcoms would occasionally balance their humor with more dramatic and humanistic moments, these remained the exception to the rule as the 1960s progressed. Beginning around 1969 in the US, there was a brief spate of half-hour shows that purposely alternated between comedy and drama and aired without a laugh track, as well as some hour-long shows such as CHiPs in the late 1970s to early 1980s. These were known as "comedy-dramas".

A notable early (1969-1974) example of this genre was the award-winning Room 222, one of the first fully racially integrated television series. The episodes blended comedy with weighty subjects such as race relations, integrity, student smoking and mortality as well as topical issues such as the Vietnam War and the plight of returning war veterans.

The sitcom formula pioneered by Norman Lear in the 1970s in which a half-hour multi-camera situation comedy addressed serious issues in a dramatic format on videotape before a live studio audience is considered another type of comedy-drama hybrid. Examples of this genre include All in the Family, M*A*S*H, and One Day at a Time.[7]

Another example was The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd, which aired from 1987 to 1991.[8] In fact, the term "dramedy" was coined to describe the late 1980s wave of shows, including Hooperman,[9] Doogie Howser, M.D., and Frank's Place.[10]

These early shows influenced how general TV comedies and series (especially family themed sitcoms) were developed. They often included brief dramatic interludes and more serious subject matter. An example of a successful comedy-drama series that distinguished this genre in television was the series Moonlighting. It generated critical acclaim and was a highly rated series worldwide. Another example of a successful comedy-drama was the television series Eight Is Enough. The show was distinct, because it was not a comedy-drama in the traditional sense. It was an hour-long series that used a laugh track, which was very unusual, but is considered a comedy-drama for the fact that it alternated between drama and comedy.[11]

In the United Kingdom, the format first appeared successfully in 1979 with the long-running series Minder, along with other notable comedy-dramas such as Auf Wiedersehen, Pet and Big Deal.

In addition, comedy-drama series have been associated with the single-camera production format.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Dramedy". Cambridge Dictionary. Cambridge University Press. Retrieved 30 May 2018.
  2. ^ "Dramedy". Oxford Dictionary. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 30 May 2018.
  3. ^ Joel D. Chaston (January 2001). "Baum, Bakhtin, and Broadway: A Centennial Look at the Carnival of Oz". The Lion and the Unicorn. 25 (1): 128–149. doi:10.1353/uni.2001.0002.
  4. ^ J. L. Styan (1968). The Dark Comedy: The Development of Modern Comic Tragedy. ISBN 0-521-09529-8. Retrieved 2012-07-30.
  5. ^ O'Donnell, Victoria (2017). "5. Television Genres". Television Criticism (3rd ed.). SAGE Publications. pp. 101–102. ISBN 978-1483377681. Retrieved 30 May 2018.
  6. ^ Kopcow, Chris (October 23, 2014). "Is the Future of Comedy the Comedy/Drama Hybrid?". Vulture. Retrieved 30 May 2018.
  7. ^ O'Dell, Cary (October 25, 2013). "One Day at a Time". Encyclopedia of Television. Museum of Broadcast Communications. Retrieved December 10, 2017.
  8. ^ Brinkmoeller, Tom (September 3, 2010). "Classic "Molly Dodd" Series Remains Locked Up, Awaiting 'Bail'". TV Worth Watching. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  9. ^ Kelley, Bill (September 23, 1987). "The Best And The Brightest Abc`s Hooperman -- The Hands-down Winner Of The Best New Show Of The Year -- Introduces A New Format, ``dramedy,`` While Slap Maxwell Reintroduces Dabney Coleman". Sun Sentinel. Retrieved September 24, 2017.
  10. ^ Hill, Michael (August 6, 1989). "Bochco gives dramedy another go with 'Doogie Howser, M.D.'". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  11. ^ "Eight is Enough". Fifties Web. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
A League of Their Own

A League of Their Own is a 1992 American sports comedy-drama film that tells a fictionalized account of the real-life All-American Girls Professional Baseball League (AAGPBL). Directed by Penny Marshall, the film stars Geena Davis, Tom Hanks, Madonna, Rosie O'Donnell, and Lori Petty. The screenplay was written by Lowell Ganz and Babaloo Mandel from a story by Kelly Candaele and Kim Wilson.

In 2012, A League of Their Own was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

Anna Kendrick

Anna Cooke Kendrick (born August 9, 1985) is an American actress and singer. She began her career as a child actress in theater productions. Her first starring role was in the 1998 Broadway musical High Society. She later made her feature film debut in the musical comedy Camp (2003).

Kendrick rose to prominence for her supporting role as Jessica Stanley in The Twilight Saga (2008–2012). Her starring role in Jason Reitman's comedy-drama film Up in the Air, which was released in 2009, received praise from critics and a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. She achieved further recognition for starring as Beca Mitchell in the Pitch Perfect film series (2012–2017).

Kendrick also had starring roles in the comedy-drama 50/50 (2011), the crime-drama End of Watch (2012), the musical-fantasy Into the Woods (2014), the drama Cake (2014), the adult comedy Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates (2016), the animated comedy Trolls (2016), and the mystery-thriller comedy A Simple Favor (2018). Kendrick published a memoir in 2016, titled Scrappy Little Nobody.

Babe (film)

Babe is a 1995 Australian-American comedy-drama film directed by Chris Noonan, produced by George Miller, and written by both. It is an adaptation of Dick King-Smith's 1983 novel The Sheep-Pig, also known as Babe: The Gallant Pig in the US, which tells the story of a pig raised as livestock who wants to do the work of a sheepdog. The main animal characters are played by a combination of real and animatronic pigs and Border Collies.After seven years of development, Babe was filmed in Robertson, New South Wales, Australia. The talking-animal visual effects were done by Rhythm & Hues Studios and Jim Henson's Creature Shop. The film was both a box office and critical success. It earned seven Academy Awards nominations, including Best Picture. In 1998, Miller went on to direct a sequel, Babe: Pig in the City.

Dog Day Afternoon

Dog Day Afternoon is a 1975 American crime comedy drama film directed by Sidney Lumet, written by Frank Pierson, and produced by Martin Bregman and Martin Elfand. The film stars Al Pacino, John Cazale, Charles Durning, Chris Sarandon, Penelope Allen, James Broderick, Lance Henriksen, and Carol Kane. The title refers to the sultry "dog days" of summer.

The film was inspired by P. F. Kluge's article "The Boys in the Bank" in LIFE magazine, about a similar robbery of a Brooklyn bank by John Wojtowicz and Salvatore Naturale on August 22, 1972.

The film received critical acclaim upon its September 1975 release by Warner Bros., some of which referred to its anti-establishment tone. Dog Day Afternoon was nominated for several Academy Awards and Golden Globe awards, and won the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay. In 2009, the film was deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" by the Library of Congress and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry.

Fleabag

Fleabag is a British comedy-drama television series set in London. It was originally produced by Two Brothers Pictures for digital channel BBC Three in a co-production agreement with Amazon Studios. The show premiered on 21 July 2016. Show creator Phoebe Waller-Bridge writes and stars as the protagonist, Fleabag, an angry, confused, sex-addicted young woman living in London. The programme is particularly known for "breaking the fourth wall" when the main protagonist talks to the camera. The second series began broadcasting on 4 March 2019, adding Kristin Scott Thomas, Fiona Shaw and Andrew Scott to the cast. Sian Clifford, who plays Fleabag’s sister Claire has suggested that the series will end with the second series as she believes that the story is complete.

Hung (TV series)

Hung is a comedy-drama television series which ran on HBO from June 28, 2009 to December 4, 2011. It was created by Colette Burson and Dmitry Lipkin and stars Thomas Jane as Ray Drecker, a struggling suburban Detroit high-school basketball and baseball coach who resorts to male prostitution. The second season premiered on June 27, 2010, and concluded its 10-episode run on September 12, 2010. The third and final season premiered on October 2, 2011, and concluded its 10-episode run on December 4, 2011.

Lady Bird (film)

Lady Bird is a 2017 American comedy-drama film written and directed by Greta Gerwig and starring Saoirse Ronan, Laurie Metcalf, Tracy Letts, Lucas Hedges, Timothée Chalamet, Beanie Feldstein, Stephen McKinley Henderson, and Lois Smith. Set in Sacramento, California, in 2002, it is a coming-of-age story of a high-school senior and her turbulent relationship with her mother.

The film premiered at the Telluride Film Festival on September 1, 2017, and was released in the United States on November 3, 2017, by A24. Critics praised the film's screenplay, direction, and Ronan and Metcalf's performances. Lady Bird was chosen by the National Board of Review, the American Film Institute, and Time magazine as one of the ten best films of the year. At the 90th Academy Awards, it earned five nominations: Best Picture, Best Actress (for Ronan), Best Supporting Actress (for Metcalf), Best Original Screenplay, and Best Director. At the 75th Golden Globe Awards, the film won two awards—Best Motion Picture (Musical or Comedy) and Best Actress (Motion-Picture Musical or Comedy) (for Ronan)—and was nominated for two others. It was also nominated for three British Academy Film Awards.

List of British television programmes

This is a list of British television programmes. It does not include foreign-made imports.

Lists of comedy films

Lists of comedy films are divided into the lists below.

Love, Simon

Love, Simon is a 2018 American romantic teen comedy-drama film directed by Greg Berlanti, written by Isaac Aptaker and Elizabeth Berger, and based on the novel Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda by Becky Albertalli. The film stars Nick Robinson, Josh Duhamel, and Jennifer Garner. It centers on Simon Spier, a closeted gay high school boy who is forced to balance his friends, his family, and the blackmailer threatening to out him to the entire school, while simultaneously attempting to discover the identity of the anonymous classmate with whom he has fallen in love online.

Love, Simon premiered at the Mardi Gras Film Festival on February 27, 2018, and was released in the United States on March 16, 2018, by 20th Century Fox. Critics praised the film for its "big heart, diverse and talented cast, and revolutionary normalcy", describing it as "tender, sweet, and affecting" and a "hugely charming crowd-pleaser" that is "funny, warm-hearted and life-affirming", with reviews comparing it to the romantic comedy-drama films of John Hughes. Notable as the first film by a major Hollywood studio to focus on a gay teenage romance, it grossed $66 million worldwide.

Molly (1999 film)

Molly is a 1999 romantic comedy-drama film about a 28-year-old woman with autism who comes into the custody of her neurotic executive brother. The film was directed by John Duigan and written by Dick Christie of Small Wonder-fame, and stars Elisabeth Shue as the titular character, Aaron Eckhart as her older brother, and Jill Hennessy.

Mrs. Doubtfire

Mrs. Doubtfire is a 1993 American comedy-drama film, directed by Chris Columbus and written for the screen by Randi Mayem Singer and Leslie Dixon, based on the novel Alias Madame Doubtfire by Anne Fine. It stars Robin Williams (who also served as a co-producer), Sally Field, Pierce Brosnan, Harvey Fierstein, and Robert Prosky. It follows a recently divorced actor who dresses up as a female housekeeper to be able to interact with his children. The film addresses themes of divorce, separation, and the effect they have on a family.

The film was released in the United States on November 24, 1993. It won the Academy Award for Best Makeup and the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy. Robin Williams was awarded the Golden Globe for Best Actor.

It grossed $441.3 million on a $25 million budget, becoming the second-highest-grossing film of 1993 worldwide. Though the film received mixed reviews; the film placed 67th in the American Film Institute's "AFI's 100 Years...100 Laughs" list and 40th on Bravo's "100 Funniest Movies of All Time." The original music score was composed by Howard Shore.

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood (stylized as Once Upon a Time in… Hollywood) is an upcoming crime thriller film written and directed by Quentin Tarantino and starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Brad Pitt and Margot Robbie. Set in Los Angeles, the film tells the story of television actor Rick Dalton and his stunt double Cliff Booth as they make their way through a changing film industry.

First announced in July 2017, the film will be the first of Tarantino's not to be associated with Harvey Weinstein, after Tarantino cut ties with The Weinstein Company following sexual abuse allegations against Weinstein later that October. Sony Pictures won the distribution rights, having met several of Tarantino's demands including final cut privilege. Pitt, DiCaprio and Robbie, as well as several Tarantino regulars such as Tim Roth, Kurt Russell and Michael Madsen, joined the cast between January and June 2018. Principal photography lasted from that June through November around Los Angeles. It is the last film to feature Luke Perry, who died in March 2019.

The film is an American and British venture, produced by Columbia Pictures, Heyday Films and Bona Film Group, and scheduled to be released in the United States on July 26, 2019.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (film)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a 1975 American comedy-drama film directed by Miloš Forman, based on the 1962 novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey. The film stars Jack Nicholson as Randle McMurphy, a new patient at a mental institution, and features a supporting cast of Louise Fletcher, William Redfield, Will Sampson, Sydney Lassick, Brad Dourif, and Christopher Lloyd in his film debut.

Filming began in January 1975 and lasted three months, taking place on location in Salem, Oregon, and the surrounding area, as well as on the Oregon coast. The producers decided to shoot the film in the Oregon State Hospital, an actual mental hospital, as this was also the setting of the novel.

Considered by some to be one of the greatest films ever made, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is No. 33 on the American Film Institute's 100 Years... 100 Movies list. The film was the second to win all five major Academy Awards (Best Picture, Actor in Lead Role, Actress in Lead Role, Director and Screenplay) following It Happened One Night in 1934, an accomplishment not repeated until 1991 with The Silence of the Lambs. It also won numerous Golden Globe and BAFTA Awards. In 1993, the film was deemed "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" by the United States Library of Congress, and selected for preservation in the National Film Registry.

The Favourite

The Favourite is a 2018 period black comedy film directed by Yorgos Lanthimos and written by Deborah Davis and Tony McNamara. It is a co-production by producers in the United Kingdom, Ireland and the United States. Set in early 18th-century England, the story examines the relationship between two cousins, Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough (played by Rachel Weisz), and Abigail Masham, Baroness Masham (Emma Stone), vying to be court favourites of Queen Anne (Olivia Colman); it is loosely based on historical events. Filming took place at Hatfield House in Hertfordshire, and at Hampton Court Palace in Hampton Court, Surrey, between March and May 2017.

The film premiered at the 75th Venice International Film Festival on 30 August 2018, where it won the Grand Jury Prize and the Volpi Cup for Best Actress (for Colman). It was released in the United States on 23 November 2018 by Fox Searchlight Pictures, and in the United Kingdom and Ireland on 1 January 2019. It became a box-office success, grossing over $95 million on a $15 million budget.

The Favourite received critical acclaim, with accolades for its screenplay, direction, acting, cinematography, music, costume design, and production values. It received numerous awards and nominations. Both Roma and The Favourite each received ten Academy Award nominations, with both films being at the top of the list for most highly nominated films for the 91st Academy Awards. The Favourite also won a leading seven BAFTA Awards (including Best British Film and Best Actress in a Supporting Role for Weisz) and ten British Independent Film Awards. Colman won Best Actress at the Academy Awards, the Golden Globes, and the BAFTAs.

The Grand Budapest Hotel

The Grand Budapest Hotel is a 2014 comedy film written and directed by Wes Anderson, from a story by Anderson and Hugo Guinness, inspired by the writings of Stefan Zweig, to whom Anderson wrote the film as a tribute.

Set at the fictional war-torn European country Zubrowka in the 1930s, The Grand Budapest Hotel tells the story of two people: Monsieur Gustave H. (Ralph Fiennes), a concierge, one of his employees, the lobby boy Zero (Tony Revolori), and the friendship they form as they team up for several misadventures while trying to prove Gustave's innocence after he was framed for murder.

The film is an American-German co-production that was financed by German financial companies and film-funding organizations and filmed in Germany. The Grand Budapest Hotel released to widespread critical acclaim and was financially successful, grossing about $175 million worldwide on a $25 million budget, and was included in several critics' year-end top-10 lists.The film won the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy and garnered three more Golden Globe Award nominations, including Best Director for Anderson. It was nominated for nine Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director for Anderson, and won four Oscars for Best Costume Design, Best Makeup and Hairstyling, Best Production Design and Best Original Score. In a 2016 BBC poll, several critics voted the film the 21st greatest film of the 21st century since 2000.

The Love Boat

The Love Boat is an American comedy/drama television series set on luxury passenger cruise ship S.S. Pacific Princess, which aired on the ABC television network from May 5, 1977 until May 24, 1986; plus, four three-hour long specials aired in 1986, 1987, and 1990. The series revolves around the ship's captain Merrill Stubing (played by Gavin MacLeod) and a handful of its crew, with several passengers—played by various guest star actors for each episode—having romantic and humorous adventures. It was part of ABC's popular Saturday-night lineup of the time, which also included Fantasy Island until that series ended two years earlier in 1984.

The original 1976 made-for-TV movie on which the show was based (also titled The Love Boat) was itself based on the nonfiction book Love Boats by Jeraldine Saunders, a real-life cruise director on a passenger cruise ship line. It was followed by two more TV-made-for movies (titled The Love Boat II and The New Love Boat), all before the series began its first season in September 1977.The executive producer for the series was Aaron Spelling, who produced several TV series for Four Star Television, and American Broadcasting Company (ABC) from the 1960s into the 1980s.

In 1997, the episode with segment titles "Hidden Treasure", "Picture from the Past", and "Ace's Salary" (season 9, episode 3) was ranked No. 82 on TV Guide's 100 Greatest Episodes of All Time from TV Guide magazine. The Love Boat ran for nine seasons plus four specials. Another made-for-TV movie, titled The Love Boat: A Valentine Voyage, starring four of the original cast members, aired finally on February 12, 1990.

The Parent Trap (1998 film)

The Parent Trap is a 1998 American romantic comedy-drama film co-written and directed by Nancy Meyers, and produced and co-written by Charles Shyer. It is a remake of the 1961 film of the same name and an adaptation of Erich Kästner's German novel Lottie and Lisa (Das doppelte Lottchen).

Dennis Quaid and Natasha Richardson star as a divorced couple who separated shortly after their identical twin daughters' birth; Lindsay Lohan stars (in her film debut) as both twins, Hallie Parker and Annie James, who are fortuitously reunited at summer camp after being separated at birth. David Swift wrote the screenplay for the original 1961 film based on Lottie and Lisa. The story is comparable to that of the 1936 Deanna Durbin film Three Smart Girls. Swift is credited along with Meyers and Shyer as co-writers of the 1998 version.

Vicky Cristina Barcelona

Vicky Cristina Barcelona is a 2008 romantic comedy-drama film written and directed by Woody Allen. The plot centers on two American women, Vicky and Cristina, who spend a summer in Barcelona, where they meet an artist, Juan Antonio, who is attracted to both of them while still enamored of his mentally and emotionally unstable ex-wife María Elena. The film was shot in Spain in Barcelona, Avilés and Oviedo, and was Allen's fourth consecutive film shot outside the United States.

The film premiered at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival, then received a rolling worldwide general release that started on August 15, 2008, in the United States, and continued in various countries until its June 2009 release in Japan. The film was nominated for four Golden Globe Awards, including nominations for Bardem, Hall and Cruz for Best Actor, Best Actress, and Best Supporting Actress, respectively, and won the award for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy. Cruz won both the Academy Award and BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Supporting Role. Altogether, the film won 25 out of 56 nominations.

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