Columnist

A columnist is a person who writes for publication in a series, creating an article that usually offers commentary and opinions.

Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and other publications, including blogs. They take the form of a short essay by a specific writer who offers a personal point of view. In some instances, a column has been written by a composite or a team, appearing under a pseudonym, or (in effect) a brand name. Some columnists appear on a daily or weekly basis and later reprint the same material in book collections.

Oonyday
Heading for O. O. McIntyre's columns, collected in his 1935 bestseller, The Big Town

Radio and television

Newspaper columnists of the 1930s and 1940s, such as Franklin Pierce Adams (also known as FPA), Nick Kenny, John Crosby, Jimmie Fidler, Louella Parsons, Drew Pearson, Ed Sullivan and Walter Winchell, achieved a celebrity status and used their syndicated columns as a springboard to move into radio and television. In some cases, such as Winchell and Parsons, their radio programs were quite similar in format to their newspaper columns. Rona Barrett began as a Hollywood gossip columnist in 1957, duplicating her print tactics on television by the mid-1960s. One of the more famous syndicated columnists of the 1920s and 1930s, O. O. McIntyre, declined offers to do a radio series because he felt it would interfere and diminish the quality of writing in his column, "New York Day by Day."

Books

Franklin Pierce Adams and O. O. McIntyre both collected their columns into a series of books, as did other columnists. McIntyre's book, The Big Town: New York Day by Day (1935) was a bestseller. Adams' The Melancholy Lute (1936) is a collection of selections from three decades of his columns. H. Allen Smith's first humor book, Low Man on a Totem Pole (1941), and his two following books, were so popular during World War II that they kept Smith on the New York Herald Tribune's Best Seller List for 100 weeks and prompted a collection of all three in 3 Smiths in the Wind (1946). When Smith's column, The Totem Pole, was syndicated by United Features, he told Time:

Just between you and me, it's tough. A typewriter can be a pretty formidable contraption when you sit down in front of it and say: "All right, now I'm going to be funny."[1]

The writing of French humor columnist Alain Rémond has been collected in books. The Miami Herald promoted humor columnist Dave Barry with this description: "Dave Barry has been at The Miami Herald since 1983. A Pulitzer Prize winner for commentary, he writes about issues ranging from the international economy to exploding toilets." Barry has collected his columns into a series of successful books. He stopped writing his nationally syndicated weekly column in 2005,[2] and the Miami Herald now offers on its website a lengthy selection of past columns by Barry.[3]

In 1950, Editor & Publisher looked back at the newspaper columnists of the 1920s:

"Feature service of various sorts is new," Hallam Walker Davis wrote in a book, The Column, which was published in 1926. "It has had the advantage of high-powered promotion. It is still riding on the crest of the first big wave its own splash sent out." But Mr. Davis did think that in a decade or two the newspapers might be promoting their columns along with their comic strips. The World had started the ball rolling with billboard advertising of Heywood Broun's "It Seems to Me." The McNaught Syndicate was sitting pretty with O. O. McIntyre, Will Rogers and Irvin S. Cobb on its list. The New York Herald Tribune offered Don Marquis and Franklin P. Adams rhymed satirically in "The Conning Tower" for the New York World Syndicate. "A Line o' Type or Two", Bert Leston Taylor's verse column in the Chicago Tribune, was now being done by Richard Henry Little. Other offerings: humorous sketches by Damon Runyon; O. Henry stories; editorials by Arthur Brisbane; Ring Lardner letter; "Rippling Rhymes", by Walt Mason; literary articles by H. L. Mencken.[4]

Newspaper and magazine

In at least one situation, a column expanded to become an entire successful magazine. When Cyrus Curtis founded the Tribune and Farmer in 1879, it was a four-page weekly with an annual subscription rate of 50 cents. He introduced a women's column by his wife, Louise Knapp Curtis, and it proved so popular that in 1883, he decided to publish it as a separate monthly supplement, Ladies Journal and Practical Housekeeper, edited by Louise Curtis. With 25,000 subscribers by the end of its first year, it was such a success that Curtis sold Tribune and Farmer to put his energy into the new publication, which became the Ladies' Home Journal.

Types

See also

References

  1. ^ "Totem Column". Time. November 10, 1941. Retrieved September 7, 2017. (Subscription required (help)). Cite uses deprecated parameter |subscription= (help)
  2. ^ Curtis, Bryan (January 12, 2005). "Dave Barry: Elegy for the Humorist". Slate. Retrieved September 7, 2017.
  3. ^ "Dave Barry Living Columns & Blogs". Miami Herald. Retrieved September 7, 2017.
  4. ^ McMaster, Jane (July 29, 1950). "News of Yore 1950: News of Yore 1924: A Glance Back to 1924 in First E&P Directory". Editor & Publisher. Retrieved September 7, 2017 – via Stripper's Guide.

External links

Advice column

An advice column is a column traditionally presented in a magazine or newspaper, though it can also be delivered through other news media, such as the internet and broadcast news media. The advice column format is question and answer: a (usually anonymous) reader writes to the media outlet with a problem in the form of a question, and the media outlet provides an answer or response. The responses are written by an advice columnist (colloquially known in British English as an agony aunt, or agony uncle if the columnist is male). The image presented was originally of an older woman dispensing comforting advice and maternal wisdom, hence the name "aunt". An advice columnist can also be someone who gives advice to people who send in problems to the newspaper.

Sometimes the author is in fact a composite or a team: Marjorie Proops's name appeared (with photo) long after she retired. The nominal writer may be a pseudonym, or in effect a brand name; the accompanying picture may bear little resemblance to the actual author.

The term is beginning to fall into disuse, as the scope of personal advice has broadened to include sexual matters—pioneered by the likes of Dr. Ruth—as well as general lifestyle issues. The Athenian Mercury contained the first known advice column in 1690.

Boston Herald

The Boston Herald is an American daily newspaper whose primary market is Boston, Massachusetts and its surrounding area. It was founded in 1846 and is one of the oldest daily newspapers in the United States. It has been awarded eight Pulitzer Prizes in its history, including four for editorial writing and three for photography before it was converted to tabloid format in 1981. The Herald was named one of the "10 Newspapers That 'Do It Right'" in 2012 by Editor & Publisher.In December 2017, the Herald filed for bankruptcy. On February 14, 2018, Digital First Media successfully bid $11.9 million to purchase the company in a bankruptcy auction; the acquisition was completed on March 19, 2018. As of August 2018, the paper employs approximately 110 total employees now, compared to about 225 before the sale.

Chicago Sun-Times

The Chicago Sun-Times is a daily newspaper published in Chicago, Illinois, United States. It is the flagship paper of the Sun-Times Media Group, with the 2nd biggest circulation in Chicago.

Corriere della Sera

The Corriere della Sera (Italian pronunciation: [korˈrjɛːre ˈdella ˈseːra]; English: Evening Courier) is an Italian daily newspaper published in Milan with an average daily circulation of 410,242 copies in December 2015.First published on 5 March 1876, Corriere della Sera is one of Italy's oldest newspapers and is Italy's most read newspaper. Its masthead has remained unchanged since its first edition in 1876. It reached a circulation of over 1 million under editor and co-owner Luigi Albertini, 1900-1925. He was a strong opponent of Socialism, of clericalism, and of Prime Minister Giovanni Giolitti who was willing to compromise with those forces. Albertini's opposition to the Fascist regime forced the other co-owners to oust him 1925.Today its main competitors are Rome's la Repubblica and Turin's La Stampa.

Dallas Observer

The Dallas Observer is a free digital and print publication based in Dallas, Texas. The Observer publishes daily online coverage of local news, restaurants, music and arts, as well as longform narrative journalism. A weekly print issue circulates every Thursday. The Observer has been owned by Voice Media Group since January 2013.

The Observer is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies. It has won dozens of national and regional awards for its journalism, including two first places for longtime columnist Jim Schutze in the 2017 AAN Awards. In 1995, the H.L. Mencken Writing Award went to columnist Laura Miller, who, who, after leaving the Observer, went on to become mayor of Dallas. In 2007, two Observer reporters, Jesse Hyde and Megan Feldman, were both named finalists in the prestigious Livingston Awards for Young Journalists.

Fifth column

A fifth column is any group of people who undermine a larger group from within, usually in favour of an enemy group or nation. The activities of a fifth column can be overt or clandestine. Forces gathered in secret can mobilize openly to assist an external attack. This term is also extended to organised actions by military personnel. Clandestine fifth column activities can involve acts of sabotage, disinformation, or espionage executed within defense lines by secret sympathizers with an external force.

Gossip columnist

A gossip columnist is someone who writes a gossip column in a newspaper or magazine, especially a gossip magazine. Gossip columns are material written in a light, informal style, which relates the gossip columnist's opinions about the personal lives or conduct of celebrities from show business (motion picture movie stars, theater, and television actors), politicians, professional sports stars, and other wealthy people or public figures. Some gossip columnists broadcast segments on radio and television.

The columns mix factual material on arrests, divorces, marriages and pregnancies, obtained from official records, with more speculative gossip stories, rumors, and innuendo about romantic relationships, affairs, and purported personal problems.

Gossip columnists have a reciprocal relationship with the celebrities whose private lives are splashed about in the gossip column's pages. While gossip columnists sometimes engage in (borderline) defamatory conduct, spreading innuendo about alleged immoral or illegal conduct that can injure celebrities' reputations, they also are an important part of the "Star System" publicity machine that turns movie actors and musicians into celebrities and superstars that are the objects of the public's obsessive attention and interest. The publicity agents of celebrities often provide or "leak" information or rumors to gossip columnists to publicize the celebrity or their projects, or to counteract "bad press" that has recently surfaced about their conduct.

Jim Hunt (columnist)

Jim "Shaky" Hunt (9 November 1926 – 9 March 2006) was a Canadian sports columnist who spent over 50 years as a journalist and covered the biggest events in sports including the Stanley Cup, the Super Bowl, the Olympics, all of golf's majors and the 1972 Canada-Russia Summit Series. Hunt was known as "Shaky" thanks to his intramural goaltending career at the University of Western Ontario, where he was part of the school's first journalism graduating class, in 1948. Jim Hunt was inducted into the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame in 2004.Hunt died aged 79 after suffering a heart attack. and is remembered as a "character who had a loud and distinctive voice and loved telling good stories". Hunt left Caroline, his wife of 54 years, daughters Kathryn, and Cally, and sons Rod and Andrew. He also left two brothers, Don and Jack, and six grandchildren, Ben, Billy, Cally, Katie, Aiden and Ella.

La Stampa

La Stampa (meaning The Press in English) is an Italian daily newspaper published in Turin, Italy. It is distributed in Italy and other European nations. It is one of the oldest newspapers in Italy.

Los Angeles Times

The Los Angeles Times (sometimes abbreviated as LA Times or L.A. Times) is a daily newspaper which has been published in Los Angeles, California, since 1881. It has the fourth-largest circulation among United States newspapers, and is the largest U.S. newspaper not headquartered on the East Coast. The paper is known for its coverage of issues particularly salient to the U.S. West Coast, such as immigration trends and natural disasters. It has won more than 40 Pulitzer Prizes for its coverage of these and other issues. As of June 18, 2018, ownership of the paper is controlled by Patrick Soon-Shiong, and the executive editor is Norman Pearlstine.In the nineteenth century, the paper was known for its civic boosterism and opposition to unions, the latter of which led to the bombing of its headquarters in 1910. The paper's profile grew substantially in the 1960s under publisher Otis Chandler, who adopted a more national focus. In recent decades, the paper's readership has declined and it has been beset by a series of ownership changes, staff reductions, and other controversies. In January 2018, the paper's staff voted to unionize, and in July 2018 the paper moved out of its historic downtown headquarters to a facility near Los Angeles International Airport.

Master list of Nixon's political opponents

A master list of Nixon political opponents was compiled to supplement the original Nixon's Enemies List of 20 key people considered opponents of President Richard Nixon. The master list was compiled by Charles Colson's office and sent in memorandum form to John Dean. Dean later provided to the Senate Watergate Committee this updated "master list" of political opponents. The original list split out "Black Congressmen", listing "all of the Black congressmen [and congresswomen]".

Mike Royko

Michael Royko Jr. (September 19, 1932 – April 29, 1997) was an American newspaper columnist from Chicago. Over his 30-year career, he wrote over 7,500 daily columns for three newspapers, the Chicago Daily News, the Chicago Sun-Times, and the Chicago Tribune. Originally a humorist focused on life in Chicago, he authored Boss, a scathing negative biography of Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley in 1971. He was the winner of the 1972 Pulitzer Prize for commentary.

Peter Vecsey (sports columnist)

Peter Vecsey (born 1943) is an American sports columnist and analyst, specializing in basketball. In his childhood, he attended academic and athletic powerhouse Archbishop Molloy High School, in Queens, NY, and graduated in 1961. Vecsey currently writes a column on the NBA for the New York Post. He was formerly an analyst for TBS and NBC and is currently an analyst for NBA TV. His writing style has been described as vicious, combative and containing cruel wit. In the 1960s, he served in the United States Army Special Forces.After five years in retirement, Vecsey returned to covering the NBA in July 2017. His columns are available at: patreon.com/petervecsey

Vecsey's column in the New York Post frequently detailed behind the scenes trade maneuvers as well as spotlighting many rumors in the NBA.

Vecsey is also known for his open criticism of players. Common players he has criticized include Charles Barkley, Danny Fortson, Danny Ainge, Byron Scott, the New Jersey Nets, Larry Brown, Alonzo Mourning, the Los Angeles Clippers the New York Knicks, the Cleveland Cavaliers, Vin Baker (his alcohol problems), Shawn Kemp for fathering many children out of wedlock, and former Nets star Jayson Williams. He gave number one draft pick Joe Barry Carroll his infamous nickname 'Joe Barely Cares', as well as dubbing former 1980s Knicks player Larry Demic 'EpiDemic' after he failed to live up to expectations. Source

Peter is the younger brother of The New York Times sports columnist George Vecsey and the uncle of former Baltimore Sun sports columnist Laura Vecsey. He is the father to Taylor K. Vecsey, a journalist and editor for East Hampton Patch who had written for The East Hampton Star, where she was a senior writer, and The New York Post, and Joseph Vecsey, former street ball player, journalist, stand up comedian, male model and screenwriter.

He received the Basketball Hall Of Fame's Curt Gowdy Media Award in 2009.

Philadelphia Daily News

The Philadelphia Daily News is a tabloid newspaper that serves Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. The newspaper is owned by Philadelphia Media Network, which also owns Philadelphia's other major newspaper The Philadelphia Inquirer.

The Daily News began publishing on March 31, 1925, under founding editor Lee Ellmaker. By 1930, the newspaper's circulation exceeded 200,000, but by the 1950s the news paper was losing money. In 1954, the newspaper was sold to Matthew McCloskey and then sold again in 1957 to publisher Walter Annenberg.

In 1969, Annenberg sold the Daily News to Knight Ridder. In 2006 Knight Ridder sold the paper to a group of local investors. The Daily News has won the Pulitzer Prize three times.

Salon (website)

Salon is an American news and opinion website, created by David Talbot in 1995 and currently owned by the Salon Media Group (OTCQB: SLNM). It publishes articles on U.S. politics, culture, and current events and has a politically progressive, liberal editorial stance. Since 2007, the company has been funded by John Warnock and William Hambrecht, through cash injections.Salon's headquarters is located at 870 Market Street San Francisco, California.

Sports journalism

Sports journalism is a form of writing that reports on sporting topics and competitions.

Sports journalism is the essential element of many news media organizations. While the sports department (along with entertainment news) within some newspapers has been mockingly called the toy department, because sports journalists do not concern themselves with the 'serious' topics covered by the news desk, sports coverage has grown in importance as sport has grown in wealth, power, and influence.

Also, some media organizations are devoted entirely to sports reporting — newspapers and magazines such as L'Equipe in France, La Gazzetta dello Sport in Italy, Marca in Spain, the defunct Sporting Life in Britain, and American Sports Illustrated and Sporting News; television networks such as Eurosport, Fox Sports, ESPN; sports radio stations such as BBC Radio 5 Live, ESPN Radio, Fox Sports Radio and TSN Radio; and The Sports Network (TSN); and websites such as ESPN.com, Foxsports.com, and Yahoo! Sports.

The Washington Times

The Washington Times is an American daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C., that covers general interest topics with a particular emphasis on national politics. Its broadsheet daily edition is distributed throughout the District of Columbia and in parts of Maryland and Virginia. A weekly tabloid edition aimed at a national audience is also published.The Washington Times was founded on May 17, 1982, by Unification movement leader Sun Myung Moon and owned until 2010 by News World Communications, an international media conglomerate founded by Moon. It is currently owned by Operations Holdings, which is owned by the Unification movement.Throughout its history, The Washington Times has been known for its conservative political stance. It has drawn controversy for publishing racist content, including commentary and conspiracy theories about United States president Barack Obama and support for neo-Confederatism. It has published material promoting Islamophobia. It has published many columns which reject the scientific consensus on climate change, as well as ozone depletion and second-hand smoke.

Toronto Sun

The Toronto Sun is an English-language daily newspaper published in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

William Safire

William Lewis Safir (December 17, 1929 – September 27, 2009), better known as William Safire (), was an American author, columnist, journalist, and presidential speechwriter.

He was a long-time syndicated political columnist for The New York Times and wrote the "On Language" column in The New York Times Magazine about popular etymology, new or unusual usages, and other language-related topics.

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