Colonial Revival architecture

Colonial Revival (also Neocolonial, Georgian Revival or Neo-Georgian) architecture was and is a nationalistic design movement in the United States and Canada. Part of a broader Colonial Revival Movement embracing Georgian and Neoclassical styles, it seeks to revive elements of architectural style, garden design, and interior design of American colonial architecture.

The Centennial Exhibition of 1876 reawakened Americans to their colonial past. This movement gained momentum in the 1890s and was accelerated by the early 20th century due to the invention of the automobile, which expanded the ability of ordinary Americans to visit sites connected with their heritage.

Auburn City Hall Auburn
Memorial City Hall, Auburn, New York, built in 1929–1930 in the Colonial Revival style

History

Successive waves of revivals of British colonial architecture have swept the United States since 1876. In the 19th century, Colonial Revival took a formal style. Public interest in the Colonial Revival style in the early 20th century helped popularize books and atmospheric photographs of Wallace Nutting showing scenes of New England. Historical attractions such as Colonial Williamsburg helped broaden exposure in the 1930s.

In the post-World War II era, Colonial design elements were merged with the then popular ranch-style house design. In the early part of the 21st century, certain regions of the United States embraced aspects of Anglo-Caribbean and British Empire styles.

Defining characteristics

Colonial Revival sought to follow American colonial architecture of the period around the Revolutionary War, which drew strongly from Georgian architecture of Great Britain.

Structures are typically two stories with the ridge pole running parallel to the street, have a symmetrical front facade with an accented doorway, and evenly spaced windows on either side of it.

Features borrowed from colonial period houses of the early 19th century include elaborate front doors, often with decorative crown pediments, fanlights, and sidelights, symmetrical windows flanking the front entrance, often in pairs or threes, and columned porches.

Robinson Hall at LA Tech IMG 3763

Historic Robinson Hall on the Louisiana Tech University campus in Ruston, Louisiana, is named for the second president of the institution, William Claiborne Robinson

Hyattsville PO Nov 08

Colonial Revival post office in Hyattsville, Maryland

Henry M. Jackson's Home-1

Colonial Revival home of Henry M. Jackson in Everett, Washington

UD North Green

Brown and Sypherd Residence Halls, University of Delaware. Much of the central campus is built in Colonial Revival style.

See also

Further reading

  • Alan Axelrod, ed. The Colonial Revival in America. New York: W.W. Norton, 1985.
  • William Butler, Another City Upon a Hill: Litchfield, Connecticut, and the Colonial Revival
  • Karal Ann Marling, George Washington Slept Here: Colonial Revivals and American Culture, 1876–1986, 1988.
  • Richard Guy Wilson and Noah Sheldon, The Colonial Revival House, 2004.
  • Richard Guy Wilson, Shaun Eyring and Kenny Marotta, Re-creating the American Past: Essays on the Colonial Revival, 2006.

External links

American Telephone and Telegraph Company Building (Denmark, South Carolina)

The American Telephone & Telegraph Company Building, located in Denmark, a city in Bamberg County, South Carolina was built in 1922.The Georgian Revival building offers a number of impressive architectural features. It is a noteworthy example of the important role that telecommunications played in the early 20th century development of the South Carolina Lowcountry. The site was listed in the National Register July 8, 1999.

Benjamin Holt House

The Benjamin Holt House is a private home in Stockton, California. Built in 1869, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.

Burke–Berryman House

The Burke–Berryman House, at 418 Cheney St. in Reno, Nevada, is a historic house with elements of Queen Anne and Colonial Revival architecture. It was built c.1909-10 as a rental house in the "Burke's Addition" area of Reno, developed by Charles H. Burke.An early occupant was Samuel W. Goodale, a Chief Surveyor with the U.S. Survey Office, who lived there up to c.1917. It was sold to James J. Berryman in 1919 and he and his wife lived there from 1919 to 1934. It is one of relatively few houses of its era surviving in its neighborhood. It is now owned and maintained by the mental health company Zephyr Wellness.It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004. It was deemed significant "its role in Reno's community planning and development history" and "as an excellent local example of simplified residential Queen Anne/Colonial Revival architecture."

Cedar Grove Christian Academy

Cedar Grove Christian Academy is a private Christian school located in the Lawndale neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It is located in the former Lawndale School building. The school was built in 1903–1904, and is a two-story, three-bay, stone-faced brick building in the Colonial Revival style. Two two-story wings designed by Irwin T. Catharine were added in the 1920s. It features heavy stone sills and lintels and a crenellated parapet.The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

Dutch Colonial Revival architecture

Dutch Colonial is a style of domestic architecture, primarily characterized by gambrel roofs having curved eaves along the length of the house. Modern versions built in the early 20th century are more accurately referred to as "Dutch Colonial Revival", a subtype of the Colonial Revival style.

F. Amadee Bregy School

F. Amadee Bregy School is a historic school located in the Marconi Plaza neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It is part of the School District of Philadelphia. The building was designed by Irwin T. Catharine and built in 1923–1924. It is a three-story, nine bay, brick building on a raised basement in the Colonial Revival-style. It features large stone arched surrounds, double stone cornice, projecting entrance pavilion, and a brick parapet.It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

Lincolnshire Historic District

Lincolnshire Historic District is a national historic district located at Evansville, Indiana. The district developed after 1923, and encompasses 95 contributing buildings in a predominantly residential section of Evansville. The district's homes have a mixture of Tudor Revival and Old and new World revival designs, including Colonial Revival. St. Benedict Cathedral and Bosse High School are two landmark buildings from the 1920s and 1930s.It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1989.

Mary Disston School

Mary Disston School is a historic school building located in the Tacony neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was built in 1900–1901, and is a two-story, three-bay, "U"-shaped stone building in the Colonial Revival style. A rear addition was built in 1967. It features a recessed central entrance with columnaded porch, arched openings, and a balcony; a central Palladian window; and hipped roof.It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. For a time the building was home to St. Josaphat's Ukrainian Catholic Church.

McCarthy–Platt House

The McCarthy–Platt House, at 1000 Plumas St. in Reno, Nevada, is a historic house that was originally built in 1900 and was redesigned in 1925 by architect Frederic J. DeLongchamps. It includes Colonial Revival architecture elements.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984. It was deemed significant for association with its architect Frederic J. DeLongchamps, for its associations with Reno developer Charles McCarthy and Nevada attorney/politician Samuel Platt, and "as a noteworthy example" of Colonial Revival architecture in Nevada.

Monterey Colonial architecture

Monterey Colonial is an architectural style developed in Alta California (today's state of California when under Mexican rule). The style is characterized by two stories, continuous surrounding porches on both levels, a hip roof, and adobe walls. The first known example of the style was the Alpheus Thompson house in Santa Barbara, California, built in 1834 and demolished in 1913. The second (and oldest surviving) example is the Larkin House in Monterey, California, built by Thomas O. Larkin in 1835. The largest example of the style is the Rancho Petaluma Adobe, begun by Mariano Vallejo in Petaluma, California in 1836.

Revivals of the style have been popular in the 20th century, substituting wood framing or brick for adobe. Other common variations use gable-end roofs and second-story-only covered porches. Monterey Colonial is one of the "non-Hispanic" historical styles recognized (though not encouraged for new construction) by the architectural design guidelines of Santa Barbara, California.

Overbrook Elementary School

Overbrook Elementary School is a historic elementary school in the Overbrook neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It is part of the School District of Philadelphia. The building was built in 1905–1907, and is a two-story, nine-bay brick building faced with granite in the Colonial Revival-style. It sits on a raised basement. An eight-bay addition designed by Henry deCourcy Richards was built in 1913–1914. It features a slightly projecting front gable.The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

Philadelphia Charter School for Arts and Sciences

Philadelphia Charter School for Arts and Sciences at H.R. Edmunds is a charter school located in the Northwood neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It is located in the former Henry R. Edmunds School building. The building was designed by Irwin T. Catharine and built in 1923–1924. It is a three-story, nine-bay, brick building on a raised basement in the Colonial Revival style. It features a projecting entrance pavilion, stone cornice, and brick parapet.It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

Politz Hebrew Academy

Politz Hebrew Academy, formerly known as William C. Jacobs School and Fayette School, is a historic school located in the Bustleton neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The building consists of an original section designed by Samuel Sloan in 1855, and the main building built in 1915. The original building is a two-story, stone building sheathed in stucco. The 1915 building is a 2 1/2-story, three-bay, rectangular brick building in the Colonial Revival style. It features a hipped roof and gable dormers.The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

Spanish Colonial Revival architecture

The Spanish Colonial Revival Style (Spanish: Arquitectura neocolonial española) is an architectural stylistic movement arising in the early 20th century based on the Spanish Colonial architecture of the Spanish colonization of the Americas.The Panama-California Exposition of 1915 in San Diego, highlighting the work of architect Bertram Goodhue, is credited with giving the style national exposure. Embraced principally in California and Florida, the Spanish Colonial Revival movement enjoyed its greatest popularity between 1915 and 1931.

Thomas Dunlap School

Thomas Dunlap School is a historic former school building located in the Haddington neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was built in 1906, and is a three-story, nine bay by two bay, ashlar stone building in the Colonial Revival-style. It features a projecting, center cross gable bay, paired pilasters flanking the main entrance, and a modillioned copper cornice.The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1986. It is currently in use as apartments.

Thomas Meehan School

Thomas Meehan School is a historic former school building located in the Germantown neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was built in 1901–1902, and is a two-story, five bay, stone building in the Colonial Revival-style. It features a portico with Doric order columns, arched openings, and a modillioned cornice. It was used for industrial purposes in the mid-20th century, and now is home to the Pentecostal Faith Assembly Church.The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988.

Voorhees Chapel (Rutgers)

Voorhees Chapel is one of two chapels on the campus of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey in New Brunswick, New Jersey in the United States. Built in 1925 with a donation from Elizabeth Rodman Voorhees, wife of Rutgers trustee Ralph Voorhees, the chapel once served the community of Douglass College. Douglass, founded the New Jersey College for Women (founded in 1918), was the women's residential college at Rutgers.

The chapel is an example of Georgian period Colonial Revival architecture in the tradition of English architect Sir Christopher Wren.

The chapel houses a large mechanical-action pipe organ built by Karl Schuke Berliner Orgelbauwerkstatt. The instrument has 3-manuals & pedals, 41 independent registers, 41 speaking stops, and 65 ranks.

West Vernor–Lawndale Historic District

The West Vernor–Lawndale Historic District is a two-block commercial historic district located along West Vernor Highway between Cabot and Ferris Streets in Detroit, Michigan. The district includes 30 acres (120,000 m2) and 10 buildings. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002.

William W. Axe School

William W. Axe School is a historic school building located in the Frankford neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was designed by Lloyd Titus and built in 1903–1904. It is a two-story, three-bay, stone building on a raised basement in the Colonial Revival style. It has a one-story, rear brick addition. It features stone lintels and sashes and a projecting center section with gable.It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. It is currently home to the Northeast Frankford site of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Philadelphia.

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