College World Series

The College World Series (CWS) is an annual June baseball tournament held in Omaha, Nebraska. The CWS is the culmination of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Baseball Championship tournament—featuring 64 teams in the first round—which determines the NCAA Division I college baseball champion. The eight participating teams are split into two, four-team, double-elimination brackets, with the winners of each bracket playing in a best-of-three championship series.

College World Series
Cws logo new ncaa2016
First played1947
Most recently played2018
Current championsOregon State (3rd title)
Current runner-upArkansas
Most titlesUSC (12)

History

Since 1950, the College World Series (CWS) has been held in Omaha, Nebraska.[1][2] It was held at Rosenblatt Stadium from 1950 through 2010; starting in 2011, it has been held at TD Ameritrade Park Omaha. Earlier tournaments were held at Hyames Field in Kalamazoo, Michigan (1947–48), and Lawrence Stadium in Wichita, Kansas (1949). The name "College World Series" is derived from that of the Major League Baseball World Series championship; it is currently an MLB trademark licensed to the NCAA.[3]

Contract extension

On June 10, 2009, the NCAA and College World Series of Omaha, Inc., which is the non-profit group that organizes the event, announced a new 25-year contract extension, keeping the CWS in Omaha through 2035.[4] A memorandum of understanding had been reached by all parties on April 30.[5]

The currently binding contract began in 2011, the same year the tournament moved from Johnny Rosenblatt Stadium to TD Ameritrade Park Omaha, a new ballpark across from CenturyLink Center Omaha.

Format history and changes

See also: NCAA Division I Baseball Championship § Past formats
  • 1947 – Eight teams were divided into two, four-team, single-elimination playoffs. The two winners then met in a best-of-three final in Kalamazoo, Michigan.
  • 1948 – Similar to 1947, but the two, four-team playoffs were changed to double-elimination tournaments. Again in the finals, the two winners met in a best-of-three format in Kalamazoo.
  • 1949 – The final was expanded to a four-team, double-elimination format and the site changed to Wichita, Kansas. Eight teams began the playoffs with the four finalists decided by a best-of-three district format.
  • 1950–1987 – An eight-team, double-elimination format for the College World Series coincided with the move to Omaha, Nebraska in 1950. From 1950 to 1953, a baseball committee chose one team from each of the eight NCAA districts to compete at the CWS, which constituted the entire Division I tournament, as there were no preliminary rounds. (In 1948 and 1949, a selection committee in each of the eight districts chose its district representative based on the committee's own criteria, which might or might not include committee selections, conference champions, and district playoffs.) Through 1987 the College World Series was a pure double-elimination event. That ended with the 1987 College World Series. In 1954, the Division I tournament began having preliminary rounds to determine the eight CWS teams. From 1954 to 1975, the number of teams in the first round of the overall tournament ranged from 21 to 32. The number of first-round teams was increased to 34 in 1976, 36 in 1982, 38 in 1985, 40 in 1986, and 48 in 1987.
  • 1988–1998 – The format was changed beginning with the 1988 College World Series, when the tournament was divided into 2 four-team double-elimination brackets, with the survivors of each bracket playing in a single championship game. The single-game championship was designed for network television, with the final game on CBS on a Saturday afternoon.
Before expanding to 64 teams in 1999, the 1998 Division I tournament began with 48 teams, split into 8 six-team regionals. The 8 regional winners advanced to the College World Series. The regionals were a test of endurance, as teams had to win at least four games over four days, sometimes five if a team dropped into the loser's bracket, placing a premium on pitching. In the last two years of the six-team regional format, the eventual CWS champion – LSU in 1997 and Southern California in 1998 – had to battle back from the loser's bracket in the regional to advance to Omaha.
  • 1999–2002 – With some 293 Division I teams playing, the NCAA expanded the overall tournament to a 64-team Regional field in 1999—with 8 National Seed teams (the top 8 seeds)—divided into 16 four-team regionals (each region seeded 1 to 4). The winners of the 16 "Regionals" advance to a second round, consisting of 8 two-team, best-of-three-format "Super Regionals". (The National Seed teams that win their regional bracket are placed in different Super Regionals, so that no National Seed teams meet each other in a Super Regional.) The 8 Super Regional winners advance to the CWS in Omaha. While the CWS format remained the same, the expanded field meant that the eight CWS teams now are determined by the second-round Super Regionals. The 64-team bracket is set at the beginning of the championship and teams are not reseeded for the CWS. Since the 1999 College World Series, the four-team brackets in the CWS have been determined by the results of super-regional play, much like the NCAA basketball tournament. Prior to 1999, the four-team brackets were determined by the regional tournaments.
  • 2003–present – The championship final became a best-of-three series between the 2 four-team bracket winners, with games scheduled for Saturday, Sunday, and Monday evenings. In the results shown below, Score indicates the score of the championship game(s) only. In 2008, the start of the CWS was moved back one day, and an extra day of rest was added in between bracket play and the championship series.

Division I champions by year

Year Champion Coach Score Runner-Up Most Outstanding Player
1947 California Clint Evans 17–8, 8–7 Yale
1948 Southern California Sam Barry 3–1, 3–8, 9–2 Yale
1949 Texas Bibb Falk 10–3 Wake Forest Tom Hamilton, Texas
1950 Texas Bibb Falk 3–0 Washington State Ray VanCleef, Rutgers
1951 Oklahoma Jack Baer 3–2 Tennessee Sidney Hatfield, Tennessee
1952 Holy Cross Jack Barry 8–4 Missouri James O'Neill, Holy Cross
1953 Michigan Ray Fisher 7–5 Texas J.L. Smith, Texas
1954 Missouri Hi Simmons 4–1 Rollins Tom Yewcic, Michigan State
1955 Wake Forest Taylor Sanford 7–6 Western Michigan Tom Borland, Oklahoma A&M
1956 Minnesota Dick Siebert 12–1 Arizona Jerry Thomas, Minnesota
1957 California George Wolfman 1–0 Penn State Cal Emery, Penn State
1958 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 8–7 Missouri Bill Thom, Southern California
1959 Oklahoma State Toby Greene 5–3 Arizona Jim Dobson, Oklahoma State
1960 Minnesota Dick Siebert 2–1 Southern California John Erickson, Minnesota
1961 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 1–0 Oklahoma State Littleton Fowler, Oklahoma State
1962 Michigan Don Lund 5–4 Santa Clara Bob Garibaldi, Santa Clara
1963 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 5–2 Arizona Bud Hollowell, Southern California
1964 Minnesota Dick Siebert 5–1 Missouri Joe Ferris, Maine
1965 Arizona State Bobby Winkles 2–1 Ohio State Sal Bando, Arizona State
1966 Ohio State Marty Karow 8–2 Oklahoma State Steve Arlin, Ohio State
1967 Arizona State Bobby Winkles 11–2 Houston Ron Davini, Arizona State
1968 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 4–3 Southern Illinois Bill Seinsoth, Southern California
1969 Arizona State Bobby Winkles 10–1 Tulsa John Dolinsek, Arizona State
1970 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 2–1 Florida State Gene Ammann, Florida State
1971 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 7–2 Southern Illinois Jerry Tabb, Tulsa
1972 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 1–0 Arizona State Russ McQueen, Southern California
1973 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 4–3 Arizona State Dave Winfield, Minnesota
1974 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 7–3 Miami (FL) George Milke, Southern California
1975 Texas Cliff Gustafson 5–1 South Carolina Mickey Reichenbach, Texas
1976 Arizona Jerry Kindall 7–1 Eastern Michigan Steve Powers, Arizona
1977 Arizona State Jim Brock 2–1 South Carolina Bob Horner, Arizona State
1978 Southern California Rod Dedeaux 10–3 Arizona State Rod Boxberger, Southern California
1979 Cal State Fullerton Augie Garrido 2–1 Arkansas Tony Hudson, Cal State Fullerton
1980 Arizona Jerry Kindall 5–3 Hawaii Terry Francona, Arizona
1981 Arizona State Jim Brock 7–4 Oklahoma State Stan Holmes, Arizona State
1982 Miami (FL) Ron Fraser 9–3 Wichita State Dan Smith, Miami (FL)
1983 Texas Cliff Gustafson 4–3 Alabama Calvin Schiraldi, Texas
1984 Cal State Fullerton Augie Garrido 3–1 Texas John Fishel, Cal State Fullerton
1985 Miami (FL) Ron Fraser 10–6 Texas Greg Ellena, Miami (FL)
1986 Arizona Jerry Kindall 10–2 Florida State Mike Senne, Arizona
1987 Stanford Mark Marquess 9–5 Oklahoma State Paul Carey, Stanford
1988 Stanford Mark Marquess 9–4 Arizona State Lee Plemel, Stanford
1989 Wichita State Gene Stephenson 5–3 Texas Greg Brummett, Wichita State
1990 Georgia Steve Webber 2–1 Oklahoma State Mike Rebhan, Georgia
1991 LSU Skip Bertman 6–3 Wichita State Gary Hymel, LSU
1992 Pepperdine Andy Lopez 3–2 Cal State Fullerton Phil Nevin, Cal State Fullerton
1993 LSU Skip Bertman 8–0 Wichita State Todd Walker, LSU
1994 Oklahoma Larry Cochell 13–5 Georgia Tech Chip Glass, Oklahoma
1995 Cal State Fullerton Augie Garrido 11–5 Southern California Mark Kotsay, Cal State Fullerton
1996 LSU Skip Bertman 9–8 Miami (FL) Pat Burrell, Miami (FL)
1997 LSU Skip Bertman 13–6 Alabama Brandon Larson, LSU
1998 Southern California Mike Gillespie 21–14 Arizona State Wes Rachels, Southern California
1999 Miami (FL) Jim Morris 6–5 Florida State Marshall McDougall, Florida State
2000 LSU Skip Bertman 6–5 Stanford Trey Hodges, LSU
2001 Miami (FL) Jim Morris 12–1 Stanford Charlton Jimerson, Miami (FL)
2002 Texas Augie Garrido 12–6 South Carolina Huston Street, Texas
2003 Rice Wayne Graham 4–310, 3–8, 14–2 Stanford John Hudgins, Stanford
2004 Cal State Fullerton George Horton 6–4, 3–2 Texas Jason Windsor, Cal State Fullerton
2005 Texas Augie Garrido 4–2, 6–2 Florida David Maroul, Texas
2006 Oregon State Pat Casey 3–4, 11–7, 3–2 North Carolina Jonah Nickerson, Oregon State
2007 Oregon State Pat Casey 11–4, 9–3 North Carolina Jorge Luis Reyes, Oregon State
2008 Fresno State Mike Batesole 6–7, 19–10, 6–1 Georgia Tommy Mendonca, Fresno State
2009 LSU Paul Mainieri 7–6, 1–5, 11–4 Texas Jared Mitchell, LSU
2010 South Carolina Ray Tanner 7–1, 2–111 UCLA Jackie Bradley, Jr., South Carolina
2011 South Carolina Ray Tanner 2–111, 5–2 Florida Scott Wingo, South Carolina
2012 Arizona Andy Lopez 5–1, 4–1 South Carolina Rob Refsnyder, Arizona
2013 UCLA John Savage 3–1, 8–0 Mississippi State Adam Plutko, UCLA
2014 Vanderbilt Tim Corbin 9–8, 2–7, 3–2 Virginia Dansby Swanson, Vanderbilt
2015 Virginia Brian O'Connor 1–5, 3–0, 4–2 Vanderbilt Josh Sborz, Virginia
2016 Coastal Carolina Gary Gilmore 0–3, 5–4, 4–3 Arizona Andrew Beckwith, Coastal Carolina
2017 Florida Kevin O'Sullivan 4–3, 6–1 LSU Alex Faedo, Florida
2018 Oregon State Pat Casey 1–4, 5–3, 5–0 Arkansas Adley Rutschman, Oregon State

Team appearances

  • Bold indicates team won the CWS that year
School Appearances Titles Years
Alabama 5 0 1950, 1983, 1996, 1997, 1999
Arizona 17 4 1954, 1955, 1956, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1963, 1966, 1970, 1976, 1979, 1980, 1985, 1986, 2004, 2012, 2016
Arizona State 22 5 1964, 1965, 1967, 1969, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1987, 1988, 1993, 1994, 1998, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2010
Arkansas 9 0 1979, 1985, 1987, 1989, 2004, 2009, 2012, 2015, 2018
Auburn 4 0 1967, 1976, 1994, 1997
Baylor 3 0 1977, 1978, 2005
Boston College 4 0 1953, 1960, 1961, 1967
Bradley 2 0 1950, 1956
BYU 2 0 1968, 1971
California 6 2 1947, 1957, 1980, 1988, 1992, 2011
Cal State Fullerton 18 4 1975, 1979, 1982, 1984, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2015, 2017
Cal State
Los Angeles
1 0 1977
The Citadel 1 0 1990
Clemson 12 0 1958, 1959, 1976, 1977, 1980, 1991, 1995, 1996, 2000, 2002, 2006, 2010
Coastal Carolina 1 1 2016
Colgate 1 0 1955
Colorado State[a] 1 0 1950
Connecticut 5 0 1957, 1959, 1965, 1972, 1979
Creighton 1 0 1991
Dartmouth 1 0 1970
Delaware 1 0 1970
Duke 3 0 1952, 1953, 1961
Eastern Michigan 2 0 1975, 1976
Florida 12 1 1988, 1991, 1996, 1998, 2005, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018
Florida State 22 0 1957, 1962, 1963, 1965, 1970, 1975, 1980, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2008, 2010, 2012, 2017
Fresno State 4 1 1959, 1988, 1991, 2008
Georgia 6 1 1987, 1990, 2001, 2004, 2006, 2008
Georgia Southern 2 0 1973, 1990
Georgia Tech 3 0 1994, 2002, 2006
Harvard 4 0 1968, 1971, 1973, 1974
Hawaii 1 0 1980
Holy Cross 4 1 1952, 1958, 1962, 1963
Houston 2 0 1953, 1967
Indiana 1 0 2013
Indiana State 1 0 1986
Iowa 1 0 1972
Iowa State 2 0 1957, 1970
Ithaca 1 0 1962
James Madison 1 0 1983
Kansas 1 0 1993
Kent State 1 0 2012
Lafayette 4 0 1953, 1954, 1958, 1965
Long Beach State 4 0 1989, 1991, 1993, 1998
Louisiana-Lafayette 1 0 2000
Louisville 4 0 2007, 2013, 2014, 2017
Loyola Marymount 1 0 1986
LSU 18 6 1986, 1987, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2013, 2015, 2017
Maine 7 0 1964, 1976, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1986
Massachusetts 2 0 1954, 1969
Miami (FL) 25 4 1974, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1988, 1989, 1992, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2015, 2016
Michigan 7 2 1953, 1962, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984
Michigan State 1 0 1954
Minnesota 5 3 1956, 1960, 1964, 1973, 1977
Mississippi State 10 0 1971, 1979, 1981, 1985, 1990, 1997, 1998, 2007, 2013, 2018
Missouri 6 1 1952, 1954, 1958, 1962, 1963, 1964
Missouri State 1 0 2003
Nebraska 3 0 2001, 2002, 2005
New Hampshire 1 0 1956
New Orleans 1 0 1984
NYU 2 0 1956, 1969
North Carolina 11 0 1960, 1966, 1978, 1989, 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2018
NC State 2 0 1968, 2013
Northeastern 1 0 1966
Northern Colorado[b] 10 0 1952, 1953, 1955, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1974
Notre Dame 2 0 1957, 2002
Ohio 1 0 1970
Ohio State 4 1 1951, 1965, 1966, 1967
Oklahoma 10 2 1951, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1992, 1994, 1995, 2010
Oklahoma State 20 1 1954, 1955, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1990, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2016
Ole Miss 5 0 1956, 1964, 1969, 1972, 2014
Oral Roberts 1 0 1978
Oregon 1 0 1954
Oregon State 7 3 1952, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2013, 2017, 2018
Penn State 5 0 1952, 1957, 1959, 1963, 1973
Pepperdine 2 1 1979, 1992
Princeton 1 0 1951
Rice 7 1 1997, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2008
Rider 1 0 1967
Rollins 1 0 1954
Rutgers 1 0 1950
St. John's (NY) 6 0 1949, 1960, 1966, 1968, 1978, 1980
St. Louis 1 0 1965
San Jose State 1 0 2000
Santa Clara 1 0 1962
Seton Hall 4 0 1964, 1971, 1974, 1975
South Carolina 11 2 1975, 1977, 1981, 1982, 1985, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2010, 2011, 2012
Southern California 21 12 1948, 1949, 1951, 1955, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1966, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1978, 1995, 1998, 2000, 2001
Southern Illinois 5 0 1968, 1969, 1971, 1974, 1977
Southern Miss 1 0 2009
Springfield 2 0 1951, 1955
Stanford 16 2 1953, 1967, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2008
Stony Brook 1 0 2012
Syracuse 1 0 1961
TCU 5 0 2010, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
Temple 2 0 1972, 1977
Tennessee 4 0 1951, 1995, 2001, 2005
Texas 36 6 1949, 1950, 1952, 1953, 1957, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1992, 1993, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2009, 2011, 2014, 2018
Texas A&M 6 0 1951, 1964, 1993, 1999, 2011, 2017
Texas Tech 3 0 2014, 2016, 2018
Texas–Rio Grande Valley[c] 1 0 1971
Tufts 1 0 1950
Tulane 2 0 2001, 2005
Tulsa 2 0 1969, 1971
UC Irvine 2 0 2007, 2014
UCLA 5 1 1969, 1997, 2010, 2012, 2013
UC Santa Barbara 1 0 2016
Utah 1 0 1951
Vanderbilt 3 1 2011, 2014, 2015
Virginia 4 1 2009, 2011, 2014, 2015
Wake Forest 2 1 1949, 1955
Washington 1 0 2018
Washington State 4 0 1950, 1956, 1965, 1976
Western Michigan 6 0 1952, 1955, 1958, 1959, 1961, 1963
Wichita State 7 1 1982, 1988, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1996
Wisconsin 1 0 1950
Wyoming 1 0 1956
Yale 2 0 1947, 1948

Most CWS wins

Rank School Wins CWS Winning % Appearances Wins per appearance
1 Texas 85 .590 35 2.43
2 Southern California 74 .740 21 3.52
3 Arizona State 61 .616 22 2.77
4 Miami (FL) 48 .533 25 1.92
5 Arizona 43 .589 17 2.53
6 LSU 40 .597 18 2.22
6 Oklahoma State 40 .513 20 2.00
6 Stanford 40 .580 16 2.50
9 Cal State Fullerton 34 .523 18 1.89
10 South Carolina 32 .615 11 2.91

[6] [7]

Most CWS Finals appearances

  • Bold indicates team won the CWS that year
  • Regular indicates team was Runner-up that year
Rank School Champion Runner-up Total Years
1 Southern California 12 2 14 1948, 1958, 1960, 1961, 1963, 1968, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1978, 1995, 1998
2 Texas 6 6 12 1949, 1950, 1953, 1975, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1989, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2009
3 Arizona State 5 5 10 1965, 1967, 1969, 1972, 1973, 1977, 1978, 1981, 1988, 1998
4 Arizona 4 4 8 1956, 1959, 1963, 1976, 1980, 1986, 2012, 2016
5 LSU 6 1 7 1991, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2009, 2017
6 Miami (FL) 4 2 6 1974, 1982, 1985, 1996, 1999, 2001
6 South Carolina 2 4 6 1975, 1977, 2002, 2010, 2011, 2012
6 Oklahoma State 1 5 6 1959, 1961, 1966, 1981, 1987, 1990
9 Cal State Fullerton 4 1 5 1979, 1984, 1992, 1995, 2004
9 Stanford 2 3 5 1987, 1988, 2000, 2001, 2003

Most appearances without a CWS championship

(Last updated 9:51am EDT 28 June 2018)

Top 10
Rank School Appearances CWS Winning % Runner-up Wins Per Appearance
1 Florida State 22 .397 3 1.33
2 Clemson 12 .333 0 1.00
3 North Carolina 11 .439 2 1.64
4 Mississippi State 10 .375 1 1.20
4 Northern Colorado 10 .130 0 0.30
6 Arkansas 9 .455 2 1.67
7 Maine 7 .333 0 1.00
8 Western Michigan 6 .429 1 1.50
8 St. John's (NY) 6 .333 0 1.00
8 Texas A&M 6 .143 0 0.33

Most CWS participants by one conference in a year

Minimum three participants
Number Year Conference Programs CWS Winner
4 1997 SEC Alabama, Auburn, LSU, Mississippi State LSU
4 2004 SEC Arkansas, Georgia, LSU, South Carolina Cal State Fullerton
4 2006 ACC Clemson, Georgia Tech, Miami (FL), North Carolina Oregon State
4 2015 SEC Arkansas, Florida, LSU, Vanderbilt Virginia
3 1988 Pac-12 Arizona State, California, Stanford Stanford
3 1990 SEC Georgia, LSU, Mississippi State Georgia
3 1996 SEC Alabama, Florida, LSU LSU
3 1998 SEC Florida, LSU, Mississippi State Southern California
3 2005 Big 12 Baylor, Nebraska, Texas Texas
3 2008 ACC Florida State, Miami (FL), North Carolina Fresno State
3 2011 SEC Florida, South Carolina, Vanderbilt South Carolina
3 2012 SEC Arkansas, Florida, South Carolina Arizona
3 2014 Big 12 TCU, Texas, Texas Tech Vanderbilt
3 2016 Big 12 Oklahoma State, TCU, Texas Tech Coastal Carolina
3 2017 SEC Florida, LSU, Texas A&M Florida
3 2018 SEC Arkansas, Florida, Mississippi State Oregon State

Championships by conference

Rank Conference Titles
1 Pac-12 18
2 Southeastern (SEC) 11
3 Western Athletic (WAC) 7
4 Big Ten 6
4 PCC-CIBA 6
6 Independents 5
7 Big Eight 4
7 Southwest 4
9 Atlantic Coast (ACC) 2
9 Big 12 2
9 Big West (BWC) 2
9 Big West (SCBA) 2
13 Big South (BSC) 1
13 Missouri Valley (MVC) 1
13 West Coast (WCC) 1
  • CIBA was California Intercollegiate Baseball Association that competed as a division under the Pacific Coast Conference which operated under its own Charter.[8]
  • Independents = Miami Hurricanes (4) and Holy Cross Crusaders (1)
  • SCBA was Southern California Baseball Association (1977–84).
  • The Big 12 does not claim any national championships, including baseball, that were won as members of the Big Eight and makes no claim to the history or records of the Big Eight.[9][10]
  • The Western Athletic Conference claims 7 national championships in baseball by former members.[11] There are no gaps in its existence. The Conference has existed continuously since its inception.[12][13]
  • Coastal Carolina won the 2016 CWS as a member of the Big South Conference less than 24 hours before officially joining the Sun Belt Conference.[14]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Known in 1950 as Colorado A&M. At the same time, "Colorado State" referred to Colorado State College, now known as the University of Northern Colorado.
  2. ^ Prior to 1970, Northern Colorado was known as Colorado State College. Not to be confused with Colorado State University, known in 1950 as Colorado A&M.
  3. ^ UTRGV, in full The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, entered into full operation in 2015 following the merger of the University of Texas–Pan American (UTPA) and the University of Texas at Brownsville. UTRGV is credited with UTPA's College World Series appearance because the UTPA athletic program was directly transferred to the new institution.

References

  1. ^ "College World Series of Omaha, Inc. - Creighton University". Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  2. ^ CWS History. CWS Omaha, Inc. Retrieved 2017-02-11.
  3. ^ NCAA Trademarks – NCAA.org Archived 2017-05-05 at the Wayback Machine, footnote at bottom: "College World Series and Women's College World Series: The NCAA is the exclusive licensee of these marks, registered by Major League Baseball, in connection with the NCAA Division I Men's Baseball Championship and the Division I Women's Softball Championship."
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-06-12. Retrieved 2008-06-12.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link) NCAA Signs 25-Year Agreement with College World Series of Omaha, Inc.
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2008-06-12. Retrieved 2008-06-12.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link) NCAA Memorandum of Understanding...
  6. ^ "GENERAL CWS RECORDS" (PDF). NCAA. 19 April 2017. p. 14. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  7. ^ "COLLEGE WORLD SERIES". NCAA. 28 June 2017. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  8. ^ "General CWS Records, All-Time Won-Lost by Conference, Pg 19" (PDF). NCAA.org. Retrieved June 12, 2016.
  9. ^ "Big 12 National Championships". NeuLion, Inc. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  10. ^ "The College Football Report's Long (Somewhat) And Illustrious (Kind Of) History Of The Big Six". The Beachwood Media Company. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  11. ^ "Western Athletic Conference Official Site - National Champions". Western Athletic Conference. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  12. ^ "Western Athletic Conference Official Site - WAC Timeline". Western Athletic Conference. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  13. ^ "Baseball_Tournament_Records.pdf" (PDF). Western Athletic Conference. Retrieved 1 July 2017.
  14. ^ "Coastal Carolina to join Sun Belt Conference in July 2016". Ncaa.com.

External links

2005 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 2005 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament was held from May 30 through June 26, 2005. Sixty-four NCAA Division I college baseball teams met after having played their way through a regular season, and for some, a conference tournament, to play in the NCAA Tournament. The tournament culminated with 8 teams in the College World Series at historic Rosenblatt Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska.

A major format change for the regionals began in 2005. Rather than play both games of the championship round on the third day (usually Sunday) of the tournament, the "if necessary" championship game would be played on the fourth day of the tournament (usually Monday), allowing a team in the loser's bracket to rest some of its pitchers for a winner-take-all contest.

The home-state Nebraska Cornhuskers won their first College World Series game after going winless in their previous two appearances.

Texas went undefeated in the College World Series, earning its spot in the championship series with a walk-off home run against Big 12 Conference rival Baylor, before sweeping Florida in the championship series.

2006 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 2006 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament was held from June 2 through June 26, 2006. Sixty-four NCAA Division I college baseball teams met after having played their way through a regular season, and for some, a conference tournament, to play in the NCAA Tournament. The tournament culminated with 8 teams in the College World Series at historic Rosenblatt Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska.

After winning the regional and super regional rounds of the 2006 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament, eight teams advanced to Omaha. Clemson, Georgia Tech, North Carolina, Cal State Fullerton, Oregon State, Rice, Georgia, and Miami (FL) all won their super-regionals and made the trip to the 2006 College World Series. Five national seeds advanced to Omaha: Clemson (1), Rice (2), Cal State Fullerton (5), Georgia (7), and Georgia Tech (8). Third-seeded Texas and sixth-seeded Nebraska both fell in the regionals, while the fourth seed Alabama lost in super regional play.

The first pitch of the 2006 CWS was Friday, June 16, at 1:00 PM CDT (18:00 UTC). The 2006 tournament was only the second time in CWS history in which 16 games were played (the other being the 2003 College World Series).

After losing their tournament opener to Miami (FL), the Oregon State Beavers staved off elimination for four straight games to win their bracket and advance to the championship series. The Rice Owls, who had not lost a three-game series all season, were shut out in consecutive games by the Beavers and failed to score in a CWS-record 23 innings. Oregon State advanced to face North Carolina in the final.

The best-of-three championship series featured Oregon State and North Carolina. Oregon State won the deciding game, 3-2, winning the school's first national title in baseball and its second NCAA championship overall. All games were televised on ESPN and ESPN2.

Oregon State set a CWS record by winning six elimination games (four in bracket play, two in the championship series) and also became the first team ever to lose twice in Omaha and still win the title. Oregon State is the only team besides Holy Cross in 1952 to win six games in the College World Series. Oregon State played in half (eight of 16) of the games in the tournament.

OSU pitcher Jonah Nickerson was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.

Five-time national champion LSU was left out of the field of 64, the first time since 1988 The Tigers failed to qualify for a regional. LSU's overall record of 35-24 merited at-large consideration, but it was undone by poor performance in the Southeastern Conference, where the Tigers finished 8th out of 12 teams at 13-17. LSU won national championships in 1991, '93, '96, '97 and 2000 under Hall of Fame coach Skip Bertman, who was the school's athletic director at this time.

2009 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 2009 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament was held from May 29 through June 24, 2009 and is part of the 2009 NCAA Division I baseball season. The 64 NCAA Division I college baseball teams were selected out of an eligible 286 teams on May 25, 2009. Thirty teams were awarded an automatic bid as champions of their conference, and 34 teams were selected at-large by the NCAA Division I Baseball Committee.

The 2009 tournament culminated with 8 teams advancing to the College World Series at historic Rosenblatt Stadium in Omaha, Nebraska beginning on June 13.

2012 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 2012 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament began on Friday, June 1, 2012 as part of the 2012 NCAA Division I baseball season. The 64 team double elimination tournament concluded with the 2012 College World Series in Omaha, Nebraska, starting on June 15 and ending on June 25.

The 64 NCAA Division I college baseball teams were selected out of an eligible 297 teams. Thirty teams were awarded an automatic bid as champions of their conferences, and 34 teams were selected at-large by the NCAA Division I Baseball Committee.

2013 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 2013 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament began on Friday, May 31, 2013 as part of the 2013 NCAA Division I baseball season. The 64 team double elimination tournament concluded with the 2013 College World Series in Omaha, Nebraska, which began on June 15 and ended with the final round on June 25. The UCLA Bruins swept the Mississippi State Bulldogs in a best of three series to win the NCAA National Championship, the university's first in baseball and the 109th national title in all sports.The 64 participating college baseball teams were selected from an eligible pool of 298 NCAA Division I programs. Thirty teams were awarded an automatic bid as champions of their individual conferences. Additionally, 34 non-automatic qualifying teams were awarded at-large berths by the NCAA Division I Baseball Committee.

The 64 teams were divided into sixteen regionals consisting of four teams each. All four teams, in each regional, competed in a double-elimination tournament. Regional champions then faced one another in a best-of-three games series in their individual Super Regional based upon a predetermined bracketed system. This format determined the final eight participants to advance to the College World Series in Omaha, Nebraska.Fourteen of the sixteen original Regional hosts advanced to their respective Super Regional; the exceptions were the #8 national seed Oregon Ducks and the Virginia Tech Hokies.

For the first time in television history, ESPN provided live cut-ins and highlights from all 16 Regionals with the new Bases Loaded platform — similar to ESPN Goal Line and Buzzer Beater for college football and basketball.

2014 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 2014 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament began on Friday, May 30, 2014 as part of the 2014 NCAA Division I baseball season. The 64 team double elimination tournament concluded with the 2014 College World Series in Omaha, Nebraska, which started on June 14, 2014, and ended on June 25, 2014 with the Vanderbilt Commodores upsetting the 3rd seed Virginia Cavaliers 3–2 in the decisive Game 3.The 64 participating NCAA Division I college baseball teams were selected out of an eligible 298 teams. A total of 31 teams were awarded an automatic bid as champions of their conferences, and 33 teams were selected at-large by the NCAA Division I Baseball Committee.

Teams were divided into 16 regionals of four teams which conducted a double-elimination tournament. Regional champions faced each other in Super Regionals, a best-of-3-game series that determined the 8 participants of the College World Series.

2018 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 2018 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament began on Friday, June 1, 2018 as part of the 2018 NCAA Division I baseball season. The 64-team, double-elimination tournament concluded with the 2018 College World Series in Omaha, Nebraska, starting on June 16 and ended on June 28. Oregon State defeated Arkansas in the best-of-three final series to win the championship.

The 64 participating NCAA Division I college baseball teams were selected out of an eligible 298 teams. Thirty-one teams will be awarded an automatic bid as champions of their conferences, and 33 teams will be selected at-large by the NCAA Division I Baseball Committee.

Teams were divided into sixteen regionals of four teams, which conducted a double-elimination tournament. Regional champions competed in Super Regionals, a best-of-three-game series, to determine the eight participants in the College World Series. For the first time, the Tournament seeded the top 16 teams instead of pairing teams generally along geographical lines.

2018 NCAA Division I Softball Tournament

The 2018 NCAA Division I Softball Tournament is being held from May 18 through June 6, 2018 as the final part of the 2018 NCAA Division I softball season. Thirty-two teams were awarded automatic bids as champions of their conferences, and the remaining 32 were selected at-large by the NCAA Division I softball selection committee. The tournament culminates with eight teams playing in the 2018 Women's College World Series at ASA Hall of Fame Stadium in Oklahoma City. This is the first year since the 2010 Women's College World Series that neither the Florida Gators nor the Oklahoma Sooners made the Championship Series. The Florida State Seminoles will play in their first Women's College World Series Championship Series and became the first ACC team to make the Championship Series. The Washington Huskies are making their 4th Appearance in the Championship Series.

2019 NCAA Division I Softball Tournament

The 2019 NCAA Division I Softball Tournament is being held from May 17 through June 5, 2019 as the final part of the 2019 NCAA Division I softball season. Thirty-two teams were awarded automatic bids as champions of their conferences, and the remaining 32 were selected at-large by the NCAA Division I softball selection committee. The tournament culminates with eight teams playing in the 2019 Women's College World Series at ASA Hall of Fame Stadium in Oklahoma City.

Arkansas Razorbacks baseball

The University of Arkansas Razorbacks baseball team, sometimes referred to as the Diamond Hogs, are members of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Southeastern Conference (SEC), and are coached by Dave Van Horn. The program started in 1897, and is in its 96th season of play (71st consecutive) in 2018. Arkansas is one of only four schools in the SEC to turn a profit from its baseball program in recent years, along with SEC Western division rivals LSU, Mississippi State and Ole Miss. Many large schools such as Iowa State, Colorado, and Wisconsin have dropped their baseball programs because of financial losses.The Diamond Hogs have been to 30 NCAA tournaments and nine College World Series: 1979, 1985, 1987, 1989, 2004, 2009, 2012, 2015, 2018.

College World Series Most Outstanding Player

The College World Series Most Outstanding Player is an award for the best individual performance during the College World Series in Omaha, Nebraska. The recipient of the award is announced at the completion of the College World Series Championship Game. The award is similar to Major League Baseball's World Series Most Valuable Player award.

Since 1999, the winner of the award has received a miniature replica of "The Road to Omaha" sculpture, which is situated at TD Ameritrade Park Omaha. The award measures 16 inches high. There have been 10 recipients of this award who were on not on the winning team of the College World Series. The College World Series started in 1947 but the award was not given out until 1949.

College baseball

College baseball is baseball that is played on the intercollegiate level at institutions of higher education. In comparison to football and basketball, college competition in the United States plays a smaller role in developing professional players, as baseball's professional minor leagues are more extensive, with a greater history of supplying players to the top professional league. Moving directly from high school to the professional level is more common in baseball than in football or basketball. However, if players do opt to enroll at a four-year college to play baseball, they must complete three years to regain professional eligibility, unless they reach age 21 before starting their third year of college. Players who enroll at junior colleges (i.e., two-year institutions) regain eligibility after one year at that level. In the most recently completed 2017 season, there were 298 NCAA Division I teams in the United States (including schools transitioning from Division II to Division I).

As with most other U.S. intercollegiate sports, competitive college baseball is played under the auspices of either the NCAA or the NAIA. The NCAA writes the rules of play, while each sanctioning body supervises season-ending tournaments. The final rounds of the NCAA tournaments are known as the College World Series; one is held on each of the three levels of competition sanctioned by the NCAA. The College World Series for Division I takes place in Omaha, Nebraska in June, following the regular season. The playoff bracket for Division I consists of 64 teams, with four teams playing at each of 16 regional sites (in a double-elimination format). The 16 winners advance to the Super Regionals at eight sites, played head-to-head in a best-of-three series. The eight winners then advance to the College World Series, a double elimination tournament (actually two separate four-team brackets) to determine the two national finalists. The finalists play a best-of-three series to determine the Division I national champion. The most recent College World Series winner is Oregon State.

Creighton Bluejays

The Creighton Bluejays, or Jays, are the athletic teams that represent Creighton University, a Jesuit/Catholic University in Omaha, Nebraska, United States. They compete in NCAA Division I in the Big East Conference.

Florida Gators baseball

The Florida Gators baseball team represents the University of Florida in the sport of baseball. Florida competes in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA), and the Eastern Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). They play their home games in Alfred A. McKethan Stadium on the university's Gainesville, Florida campus, and are currently led by head coach Kevin O'Sullivan. In the 105-season history of the Florida baseball program, the team has won 15 SEC championships and has appeared in 12 College World Series tournaments. The Gators won their first national championship in 2017.

NCAA Division I Baseball Championship

The NCAA Division I Baseball Championship is held each year from May through June and features 64 college baseball teams in the United States, culminating in the eight-team College World Series at TD Ameritrade Park Omaha in Omaha, Nebraska. Oregon State is the 2018 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament champion, defeating runner-up Arkansas 5-0 in Game 3 to win the 2018 College World Series championship finals.

The tournament is unique in that it features four tiers of competition, alternating between double-elimination brackets and best-of-three series. In fact, throughout the entire 64-team tournament, a team can lose a total of four games and still be crowned champions.

During team selection, sixteen teams are given "national seeds". The top eight of these teams automatically host a super regional if they advance past the regional round, assuming they have the facilities to do so. Only 2 times has a national seed not hosted due to lack of proper facilities. As in other NCAA tournaments, conference champions (usually determined by a tournament) receive automatic bids, and the selection committee fills the remaining spots.

The first tier, called Regionals, consists of 16 locations that include four teams, seeded 1 through 4, competing in a double-elimination bracket. The 16 host sites are determined mostly by merit – most No. 1 seeds host – but are also contested by bids from schools guaranteeing the NCAA a certain amount of revenue from that regional. Host teams traditionally have a large advantage, although the home team for each game is determined by rule, so the host school sometimes plays as the visiting team. The winner of each regional moves on to the second tier, the Super Regionals.

Super Regionals are played at eight locations throughout the country and consist of the 16 surviving teams, matched up by predetermined regional pairings. National seeds 1-8 cannot meet each other in the super regional and are guaranteed to host. If the higher national seed in the bracket is eliminated in the regional stage, but the lower national seed advances, the super regional will be played at the national seeded team's field. If the two seeds are not national seeds, the Super Regional will be bid upon by the two competing teams. If the national seed wins the regional but is unable to host, the Super Regional is awarded to the other regional winner in its bracket. This scenario played out in 2015 when national seed Missouri State could not host a Super Regional because the minor league Springfield Cardinals, which have scheduling priority at the stadium where both teams play, were playing a home series at that time. The Super Regional was thus awarded to Arkansas. The two teams play a best-of-three series to determine who moves on to the College World Series. Although one school hosts all three games, the teams split home-team status in the first two games, with the host school batting last in the opening game and first in game 2. If a third game is needed, a coin toss determines home-team status. Ole Miss is the only school to host three Super Regionals without advancing to the College World Series under the current format. Florida State has lost five Super Regionals as host, but has also advanced to the College World Series five times under the current format.

The final eight teams meet in Omaha, Nebraska in the College World Series. The CWS mimics the earlier rounds, consisting of two double-elimination brackets of four teams each. Thereafter, the winners of each bracket meet in a best-of-three final. The winner of this final series wins the College World Series and is crowned the national champion.

NCAA Division I Softball Tournament

The NCAA Division I Softball Tournament is held annually in May/June and features 64 college softball teams in the United States, culminating in the Women's College World Series (WCWS), which is played in Oklahoma City.

South Carolina Gamecocks baseball

The South Carolina Gamecocks baseball team represents the University of South Carolina in NCAA Division I college baseball. South Carolina has perennially been one of the best teams in college baseball since 1970, posting 32 NCAA Tournament appearances, 11 College World Series berths, 6 CWS Finals appearances and 2 National Championships: 2010 and 2011. Carolina is one of six schools in NCAA history to win back-to-back titles. Since joining the Southeastern Conference in 1992, the team has competed in the Eastern division. South Carolina owns a stellar 32-18 record at the CWS, holds the NCAA record for consecutive wins (22) in the national tournament and the longest win streak ever at the CWS (12 in a row from 2010 to 2012) in which the Gamecocks played for national titles all three years.

The current head coach is Mark Kingston, with Chad Holbrook resigning on June 6, 2017. Holbrook took over for Ray Tanner, who was named athletics director at USC after the 2012 season. This follows a string of three consecutive appearances in the national championship series, including two consecutive national championships. During Tanner's stint as head coach, the Gamecocks also captured three SEC titles, one SEC tournament title, six division titles, six College World Series appearances, and thirteen of their fifteen straight NCAA Tournaments (longest streak in the SEC at the time). Between 2010 and 2012 the Gamecocks set two NCAA records for postseason success: the most consecutive NCAA tournament wins (22) and the most consecutive wins in the College World Series (12). In 2013, Carolina set the record for consecutive home NCAA tournament wins, with 29. The team plays its home games at Founders Park, which opened on February 21, 2009.

Virginia Cavaliers baseball

The Virginia Cavaliers baseball team represents the University of Virginia in NCAA Division I college baseball. Established in 1889, the team participates in the Coastal division of the Atlantic Coast Conference and plays its home games at Davenport Field. The team's head coach is Brian O'Connor. The team won the College World Series championship in 2015.

Women's College World Series

The Women's College World Series (WCWS) is the final portion of the NCAA Division I Softball Championship for college softball in the United States. The tournament format consists of two four-team double-elimination brackets. The winners of each bracket then compete in a best-of-three series to determine the Division I WCWS National Champion. The WCWS takes place at ASA Hall of Fame Stadium in Oklahoma City. From 1969 to 1981, the women's collegiate softball championship was also known as the Women's College World Series and was promoted as such. During 1969–1979, the series was played in Omaha, and in 1980–1982 in Norman, Oklahoma. The NCAA held its first six Division I tournaments in Omaha in 1982–1987, followed by Sunnyvale, California in 1988–1989. The event has been held in Oklahoma City every year since then, except for 1996 in Columbus, Georgia.

Softball was one of twelve women's sports added to the NCAA championship program for the 1981–82 school year, as the NCAA engaged in battle with the AIAW for sole governance of women's collegiate sports. The AIAW continued to conduct its established championship program in the same twelve (and other) sports. The 1982 softball championship tournaments of both the AIAW and the NCAA were called "Women's College World Series." However, after a year of dual women's championships, the NCAA conquered the AIAW and usurped its authority and membership.

NCAA Division I Men's College World Series
Ballparks
Tournaments
Broadcasters
NCAA
Division I
Division II
Division III
Single-division sports
and championships

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