College Point, Queens

College Point is a working-middle-class neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens. It is bounded to the south by Whitestone Expressway and Flushing; to the east by 138th Street and Malba/Whitestone; to the north by the East River; and to the west by Flushing Bay.[3] College Point is part of the Queens Community Board 7.[4] The 109th Precinct of the New York City Police Department (NYPD) serves College Point.[5] College Point is a diverse community, mostly residential, with some industrial areas.

College Point
College Point Boulevard
College Point Boulevard
Location within New York City
Coordinates: 40°47′06″N 73°50′06″W / 40.785°N 73.835°WCoordinates: 40°47′06″N 73°50′06″W / 40.785°N 73.835°W
Country United States
State New York
CountyQueens
Named forSt. Paul's College
Population
 • Total24,275
Race/Ethnicity
 • Hispanic35.7%
 • White32.0%
 • Asian27.9%
 • Black2.3%
 • Other2.1%
Economics
 • Median income$42,500
ZIP code
11356
Area code(s)718, 347, 929, and 917

History

Poppenhusen bust CU CP jeh
Bust of Conrad Poppenhusen
View of College Point, L.I. (2675028417)
Sketch of College Point

College Point was named for St. Paul's College, a seminary founded in 1835 by the Rev. William Augustus Muhlenberg.[6][7][8] The college closed around 1850, but the name remained. Former names include Lawrence's Neck, Tew's Neck, Flammersberg, and Strattonsport.[9]

The original European settler of this area was Captain William Lawrence.[10] He was also the largest landholder of the original incorporators of the Town of Flushing, now in Queens. He arrived in America on the sailing ship Planter in the 1630s. Lawrence married the oldest daughter of Richard "Bull Rider" Smith, who founded Smithtown on Long Island. He and his wife had a son, William Jr., who married the Richard Smiths' youngest daughter.

In 1854 the German-American industrialist Conrad Poppenhusen arrived; he was already a prosperous manufacturer in Brooklyn of hard rubber goods and expanded his operation to this small farming community. College Point became a factory town primarily for his workers, most of them also German immigrants, and the tycoon became a philanthropist, contributing to churches, libraries, and the Poppenhusen Institute, an educational beacon of College Point.[6][11] Poppenhusen is responsible for the first free kindergarten in America. He connected College Point to Flushing by the Flushing and North Side Railroad, later called Whitestone Branch. A monument on College Point Boulevard, one of the main streets in College Point, stands testament to Poppenhusen.[12] College Point became a center for breweries and day trip resorts, and in the 1920s shifted towards the manufacturing of airplane parts.

In 1926, approximately 100 single-family and two-family houses were built on the Graham estate.[13] In 1938, the 6 acres (2.4 ha) estate of Anna Schlesinger, near Ninth Avenue and 119th Street, was sold to the Daniel Corners Realty Corporation.[14] The land had previously been part of the Poppenhusen estate.[14] The Daniel Corners Realty Corporation bought the land to build fifty homes on the land, which it called College Estates.[14] Arthur Allen was the architect of the houses.[14]

In 1953, the Fleet Street Company sold 108 Cape Cod-style homes for $13,500 near 25th Avenue and 126th Street.[15] The architect of the homes was Alwin Cassens, Jr.[15] The development was called Allied Homes.[15]

A commercial park was first proposed for College Point in 1960. The 300 acres (120 ha) site was bounded by Whitestone Expressway on the southeast, 15th Avenue on the north, and 127th Street on the west, and was chosen because it was the largest suitable tract that was not on Staten Island.[16] The proposal languished for several years before being revived in 1967.[17] By the 1970s, the industrial park was in operation and the Great Adventure Amusement Park was being operated on part of the 565-acre (229 ha) complex.[18] The amusement park was condemned in 1973 due to nuisance complaints.[19]

Following the decommissioning of Flushing Airport, four large development projects were constructed around the former airport in the late 1980s. These buildings included three projects inside the 400-acre (160 ha) College Point Corporate Park, as well as another building at Linden Place and 31st Road. Floor space in these buildings rented out at an average of $10 per square foot ($110/m2), a relatively expensive rate at the time. This was due to its proximity to major transportation connections such as the LaGuardia Airport and the Bronx–Whitestone Bridge, as well as the lack of parking in nearby downtown Flushing.[20]

In 1997, the Queens Historical Society bestowed a "Queensmark" award on College Point, in hopes of encouraging historical preservation of local landmark architecture.[21] Also in the 1990s, a strip mall containing a Waldbaum's, Target, BJ's Wholesale Club, and other stores was built along 20th Avenue.[22] Correspondingly, there was an increase in residential development in the 1990s and 2000s.[6] The northern shoreline of College Point, a former oil lagoon, was designated a federal Superfund cleanup site in 2010.[23]

Character

Though College Point is today mainly residential, it also contains significant commercial presence, as well as remnants of a once-active industrial community.[6][22] Especially in the southern part of the neighborhood, there are many industrial and light commercial businesses, including what The New York Times described as "oil storage facilities, a cement plant, a Pepsi-Cola distribution facility, furniture warehouses and contractors and other small businesses".[6] The northern shoreline was redeveloped as a medium-density residential area starting in the 1980s. However, College Point's other residences consist largely of single-family homes from the 1920s.[22]

Demographics

World Journal Whitestone jeh
Headquarters of the Chinese language publication World Journal in College Point, along Interstate 678

Based on data from the 2010 United States Census, the population of College Point was 24,275, an increase of 2,868 (13.4%) from the 21,407 counted in 2000. Covering an area of 1,148.84 acres (464.92 ha), the neighborhood had a population density of 21.1 inhabitants per acre (13,500/sq mi; 5,200/km2).[1]

The racial makeup of the neighborhood was 32.0% (7,757) White, 2.3% (551) African American, 0.1% (26) Native American, 27.9% (6,774) Asian, 0.0% (2) Pacific Islander, 0.4% (97) from other races, and 1.7% (402) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 35.7% (8,666) of the population.[2]

The entirety of Community Board 7, which comprises Flushing, College Point, and Whitestone, had 263,039 inhabitants as of NYC Health's 2018 Community Health Profile, with an average life expectancy of 84.3 years.[24]:2, 20 This is longer than the median life expectancy of 81.2 for all New York City neighborhoods.[25]:53 (PDF p. 84)[26] Most inhabitants are middle-aged and elderly: 22% are between the ages of between 25–44, 30% between 45–64, and 18% over 65. The ratio of youth and college-aged residents was lower, at 17% and 7% respectively.[24]:2

As of 2017, the median household income in Community Board 7 was $51,284.[27] In 2018, an estimated 25% of College Point and Flushing residents lived in poverty, compared to 19% in all of Queens and 20% in all of New York City. One in seventeen residents (6%) were unemployed, compared to 8% in Queens and 9% in New York City. Rent burden, or the percentage of residents who have difficulty paying their rent, is 57% in College Point and Flushing, lower than the boroughwide and citywide rates of 53% and 51% respectively. Based on this calculation, as of 2018, College Point and Flushing are considered to be high-income relative to the rest of the city and not gentrifying.[24]:7

Police and crime

Flushing, College Point, and Whitestone are patrolled by the 109th Precinct of the NYPD, located at 37-05 Union Street.[28] The 109th Precinct ranked 9th safest out of 69 city precincts for per-capita crime in 2010.[29] With a non-fatal assault rate of 17 per 100,000 people, College Point and Flushing's rate of violent crimes per capita is less than that of the city as a whole. The incarceration rate of 145 per 100,000 people is lower than that of the city as a whole.[24]:8

The 109th Precinct has a lower crime rate than in the 1990s, with crimes across all categories having decreased by 83.7% between 1990 and 2018. The precinct saw 6 murders, 30 rapes, 202 robberies, 219 felony assaults, 324 burglaries, 970 grand larcenies, and 126 grand larcenies auto in 2018.[30]

A large New York City Police Academy campus was built near 28th Avenue and College Point Boulevard,[31] opening in December 2015.[32]

Fire safety

College Point contains a New York City Fire Department (FDNY) fire station, Engine Co. 297/Ladder Co. 130, at 119-11 14th Road.[33][34]

Health

Preterm and teenage births are less common in College Point and Flushing than in other places citywide. In College Point and Flushing, there were 63 preterm births per 1,000 live births (compared to 87 per 1,000 citywide), and 8 teenage births per 1,000 live births (compared to 19.3 per 1,000 citywide).[24]:11 College Point and Flushing have a higher than average population of residents who are uninsured. In 2018, this population of uninsured residents was estimated to be 14%, slightly higher than the citywide rate of 12%.[24]:14

The concentration of fine particulate matter, the deadliest type of air pollutant, in College Point and Flushing is 0.0073 milligrams per cubic metre (7.3×10−9 oz/cu ft), less than the city average.[24]:9 Thirteen percent of College Point and Flushing residents are smokers, which is lower than the city average of 14% of residents being smokers.[24]:13 In College Point and Flushing, 13% of residents are obese, 8% are diabetic, and 22% have high blood pressure—compared to the citywide averages of 22%, 8%, and 23% respectively.[24]:16 In addition, 15% of children are obese, compared to the citywide average of 20%.[24]:12

Ninety-five percent of residents eat some fruits and vegetables every day, which is higher than the city's average of 87%. In 2018, 71% of residents described their health as "good," "very good," or "excellent," lower than the city's average of 78%.[24]:13 For every supermarket in College Point and Flushing, there are 6 bodegas.[24]:10

The nearest major hospitals are NewYork–Presbyterian/Queens and Flushing Hospital Medical Center.[35]

Post offices and ZIP code

College Point is covered by the ZIP Code 11356.[36] The United States Post Office operates two post offices nearby:

  • College Point Station – 120-07 15th Avenue[37]
  • Linden Hill Station – 29-50 Union Street[38]

Education

College Point and Flushing generally have a similar rate of college-educated residents to the rest of the city. While 37% of residents have a college education or higher, 23% have less than a high school education and 40% are high school graduates or have some college education. By contrast, 39% of Queens residents and 43% of city residents have a college education or higher.[24]:6 The percentage of College Point and Flushing students excelling in math rose from 55% in 2000 to 78% in 2011, and reading achievement rose from 57% to 59% during the same time period.[39]

College Point and Flushing's rate of elementary school student absenteeism is less than the rest of New York City. In College Point and Flushing, 9% of elementary school students missed twenty or more days per school year, lower than the citywide average of 20%.[25]:24 (PDF p. 55)[24]:6 Additionally, 86% of high school students in College Point and Flushing graduate on time, more than the citywide average of 75%.[24]:6

Schools and churches

Public elementary schools, defined as kindergarten through 5th grades, include PS 29 and PS 129. College Point is home to St. Fidelis Parish, founded in 1856. The present church was completed in 1906. Adjacent to the church is the grave of Father Huber, the founding pastor. For over 150 years, the parish conducted an elementary school including kindergarten through 8th grades. In 1924, St. Fidelis School, a three-story building of 18 classrooms, opened its doors on the present 14th Avenue and 124th Street. In 1961, the 12 classroom annex was opened. In its heyday, St. Fidelis School had almost two thousand students, from kindergarten through grade 8. When it closed, there were just over 200 students. During all of these years, it was staffed by the Dominican Sisters of Amityville (Dominican Sisters of the American Congregation of the Holy Cross). Due to significant demographic changes in College Point, the elementary school was finally closed in June 2013.

1st Ref Church CP jeh
Sanctuary of First Reformed Church on 119th St

Up until Vatican II, St. Fidelis was a thriving parish. For many years, it was led by Father (and eventually Monsignor) William J. Osborne. Monsignor Osborne died in 1998 at the age of 102, the oldest living Catholic priest in the United States at the time. In the 1950s and 1960s, there were four daily masses in St. Fidelis Parish, as well as ten Sunday masses in three venues. Currently, with diminished enrollments and changing demographics, there is one daily mass, and four Sunday masses, one in Spanish.

St. Agnes Academic High School, a private Catholic high and independent of St. Fidelis parish, has been operating for over one hundred years. In its early years, it was very briefly co-educational, but is now restricted to girls. It is owned and still staffed by the Dominican Sisters of Amityville, assisted by lay men and women. For many years, Reverend Mother Agatha, O.P., was superior and principal of St. Agnes High School. The Dominican Sisters reside in Saint Agnes Convent as well as the Harbor of Grace Convent, which was the original convent for this community. In June, 2018, The Harbor of Grace Convent will permanently close, since the Diocese of Brooklyn wishes to reclaim the building. The Harbor of Grace, first opened in the early 1970s, with Sr. Julianne (Nora Daniel) Connolly, O.P. being one of its pioneers. Sister Julianne has lived there for its entire history. St. Agnes Convent, the last of the Dominican Convents in College Point, will close in 2019.

St. Fidelis Roman Catholic Church,[40], St. John's Lutheran, and The First Reformed Church of College Point host the community's three largest congregations.

Libraries

The Queens Library's Poppenhusen branch is located at 121-23 14th Avenue.[41]

Recreation

Parks

  • MacNeil Park, formerly known as College Point Shorefront Park as well as Chisholm's by many locals (after the family that owned the mansion that once stood in the park), features a water front view, full playground, basketball and handball courts, and baseball fields. The Chisholm's Mansion was located at the highest part of the park, overlooking the East River and Rikers Island. This mansion served as the summer residence of Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia during his term of office as Mayor of New York.
  • Poppenhusen Playground is a park for primary school-aged children.
  • College Point Park, the former location of P.S. 27, is located across the street from Poppenhusen Library.It is called "27" by many locals. It has basketball and handball courts as well as an adjacent municipal parking lot. A hot-dog vendor is often in the park on days with good weather and has handballs available for sale.
  • Powell's Cove Park, an environmental waterfront park, lies on the border of College Point and Malba and affords a great view of the Bronx Whitestone Bridge
  • Frank Golden Memorial Park, located behind the strip mall on 14th Avenue, features 4 baseball diamonds and is used by local softball leagues.

Sports

  • College Point Sports Park: College Point is home to a newly reconstructed hockey rink on Ulmer Street complete with floodlights and bleachers, which was part of a larger reconstruction of the College Point Fields. The baseball fields and hockey rink are now New York City Department of Parks and Recreation Fields, but the entire property used to belong to the College Sports Association, which leased the fields from the City for $1 a day. The fields were to be rebuilt in the late 1990s, but due to complications due to the EnViroFill dumping construction debris, in 1999, the construction was stopped, the fields closed and the lease revoked. The local leagues nearly collapsed due to the closure of the fields, but under the leadership of Jerry Castro, President of the Little League until 2006, and Tony Mongeluzzi, President of the Roller Hockey League, the leagues survived and are now thriving.
  • College Point Little League: The College Point Little League, based out of the College Point Little League Building, is chartered by Little League Baseball in Williamsport, and serves the College Point, Flushing, and Whitestone areas of Queens. The College Point Little League is an all volunteer organization dedicated to providing boys and girls, ages 5 through 18, a place where they can build their baseball skills while learning good sportsmanship, fair play, teamwork, and most of all, having fun.
  • College Point Stars: The College Point Stars (not affiliated with the College Point Little League) are a youth baseball team that advanced to the 2007 Cal Ripken Babe Ruth League Division World Series, coached by Nelson Santiago and Anthony Figueroa, who were involved with the Little League for several years, including managing a team of 11-year-olds to a second-place finish in New York State in the summer of 2006.

Notable structures

Landmarks and historic buildings

St. Paul's Episcopal Church, College Point jeh
St Paul's Episcopal
  • Academy Mailbox & Intercom Company – a gray-facaded warehouse on 15th Avenue built circa 1870. The building was originally used as an ice house to chill beer from a local brewery.
  • College Point Little League Building – a listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2000 as Firemen's Hall.[42]
  • Farrington's Service Station – The oldest Gulf gas station in the state and possibly the oldest gas station in Queens. It was founded in the 1860s at the corner of 126th Street and 15th Avenue as a blacksmith shop and transformed into a gas station and auto service center in the early 1900s. The building has been renovated several times over the past 150 years and is still in operation on the same corner.
  • First Reformed Church – A church built in 1872 in the small town New England style. The church is on a large lot, has a bell tower, and is adorned with "gingerbread" trim. On June 6, 2008 a fire caused damage in the steeple, which was repaired, maintaining the historical appearance of the building. (Up on 119th Street) In 2018 it was listed on the National Register.[43]
  • Poppenhusen Institute – Built in 1868 by Conrad Poppenhusen, the founder of College Point. The architecture features a French Second Empire Mansard roof topping off the three Italianate style stories. During the entire Civil War, the Poppenhusen Institute building housed the disassembled Abraham Lincoln's log cabin. After the war, it was returned to Hodgenville Kentucky, the current site of the log cabin. The Institute's other claim to fame is that it conducted America's first free kindergarten. Originally a town hall, this City Landmark now serves as a cultural and historical center and offers a variety of classes and activities.
  • Schleicher Court – A mansion built in 1857 by Morris A. Gescheidt, it is located in the middle of 123rd Street at 13th Avenue. The mansion was built for Herman A. and Malvina Schleicher, and it is the only remaining 19th-century mansion in College Point built for a German-American family.[44] From 1892 to 1923, John Jockers operated the Grand View Hotel at the property, at a time when College Point was a waterfront resort area.[45][46][44] The house was divided into apartments in 1923.[44] After the house had an electrical fire on July 9, 2008, the house was forcibly vacated by the Department of Buildings because of hazardous electrical conditions.[47][48] The house was made a New York City designated landmark in 2009.[44]
  • Spangelberg Mansion – A yellow and white-facaded mansion circa 1860 now also divided into apartments.

Shopping and entertainment

  • Farrington's Service Station was established in the 1860s on the corner of 126th Street and 15th Avenue as a blacksmith shop. John Farrington, a blacksmith, later transformed it into a gas station and auto service center in the early 1900s. The Farrington family still owns and operates the gas station on the same corner. It is the oldest Gulf station in the state.
  • Empire Market on College Point Boulevard has sold German meats and groceries since 1920 and is owned by the Lepine's a third-generation German family. The store also offers a wide variety of candy in glass jars and is a favorite among children.
  • College Meat Center, family owned and operated since 1963, has been serving local residents for over 40 years, surviving a fire in the 1980s.
  • A strip mall-style shopping center on 20th Avenue includes Target, TJ Maxx, BJ's Wholesale Club, Modell's, Old Navy, and a ShopRite supermarket. There is also a McDonald's and Starbucks in the middle of this center's parking lot.
  • De Point on 127th Street and 20th Avenue, an eco-friendly lifestyle center, was opened in 2012, with views of the Manhattan skyline, and a number restaurants, a spa, a swimming pool, a hotel, children's corner, rooftop garden restaurant and lounge and various shops.
  • The College Point Multiplex Cinemas has 12 movie screens, as well as a mini-arcade.

Other points of interest

The Flushing Airport, opened in 1927 along the shore of Flushing Bay, had been a busy aviation hub before LaGuardia Airport was built in 1939 about one mile away. It carried the IATA code FLU. In 1977, a Piper Twin Comanche crashed shortly after taking off from the airport. The incident eventually led to the closing of this airport in 1984.[49] The site remains abandoned, although plans have been proposed over the years to convert it into a blimp-port or office park. Given natural deterioration of the hangars and concrete runways, however, it is likely that the site will simply return to being natural wetlands.[50]

Transportation

MTA Regional Bus Operations' Q20A/B, Q25, Q65, and Q76 lines serve the neighborhood.[51] No New York City Subway lines have ever been built to the area, although a spur from the IRT Flushing Line (present-day 7 and <7>​ trains) was proposed during much of the early 20th century.[52]:371 The Long Island Rail Road's Whitestone Branch used to run near the area.[53]

Notable people

Notable current and former residents of College Point include:

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Table PL-P5 NTA: Total Population and Persons Per Acre - New York City Neighborhood Tabulation Areas*, 2010, Population Division - New York City Department of City Planning, February 2012. Accessed June 16, 2016.
  2. ^ a b Table PL-P3A NTA: Total Population by Mutually Exclusive Race and Hispanic Origin - New York City Neighborhood Tabulation Areas*, 2010, Population Division - New York City Department of City Planning, March 29, 2011. Accessed June 14, 2016.
  3. ^ Shaman, Diana (May 26, 1985). "IF YOU'RE THINKING OF LIVING IN COLLEGE POINT". The New York Times. p. R9. Retrieved February 27, 2019.
  4. ^ Queens Community Boards, New York City. Accessed September 3, 2007.
  5. ^ "NYPD - Precincts". nyc.gov. Retrieved 28 May 2015.
  6. ^ a b c d e Shaman, Diana (March 24, 2002). "If You're Thinking of Living In/College Point, Queens; A Sense of Seclusion Close to Manhattan". The New York Times. Retrieved February 23, 2019.
  7. ^ College Point Archived 2005-05-23 at the Wayback Machine, Times Ledger, January 20, 2000. Accessed October 24, 2007. "North of Flushing is College Point, named College Point in 1835 by the Rev. William Augustus Muhlenberg, who established St. Paul's College there in 1838."
  8. ^ College Point, Forgotten New York.
  9. ^ "Historic Interest in Queens Names". The New York Times. August 2, 1931. p. RE2.
  10. ^ College Point Park, New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. Accessed October 24, 2007.
  11. ^ During the Civil War, the Poppenhusen Institute housed Abraham Lincoln's Log Cabin, for safekeeping. After the Civil War, the log cabin was returned to its original location in Kentucky. The Benevolent Tycoon Newsday
  12. ^ Conrad Poppenhusen Statue, New York City Department of Parks and Recreation. Accessed September 10, 2007.
  13. ^ "College Point Homes Meet Big Demand". The New York Times. March 30, 1926. p. 43. Retrieved March 10, 2019 – via The New York Times.
  14. ^ a b c d "Plans 50 Houses in College Point: Buyer of Schlesinger Estate to Develop Land With Cape Cod Homes". The New York Times. July 24, 1938. p. 141. Retrieved March 10, 2019 – via ProQuest.
  15. ^ a b c "College Point to Get 108 Cape Cod Houses". The New York Times. June 28, 1953. p. R10. Retrieved March 10, 2019 – via ProQuest.
  16. ^ Crowell, Paul (August 22, 1960). "College Point Site In Queens Planned For Industrial Park; Queens Site Planned for Industrial Park". The New York Times. Retrieved February 23, 2019.
  17. ^ Bennett, Charles G. (July 30, 1967). "INDUSTRIAL PARK PUSHED IN QUEENS; Long-Dormant College Point Project Being Restudied by Planning Board HEARING NEXT MONTH Aim Is to Lure Industry and Prevent Business From Leaving Town INDUSTRIAL PARK PUSHED IN QUEENS". The New York Times. Retrieved February 23, 2019.
  18. ^ Berliner, David C. (July 15, 1973). "Amusement Park Upsets Neighbors". The New York Times. Retrieved February 23, 2019.
  19. ^ Ostroff, James (August 5, 1973). "City to Condemn Amusement Park". The New York Times. Retrieved February 23, 2019.
  20. ^ Kennedy, Shawn G. (July 27, 1988). "Real Estate; College Point Projects Add Office Space". The New York Times. Retrieved February 23, 2019.
  21. ^ Queensmark Comes to College Point. Accessed September 10, 2007.
  22. ^ a b c Hughes, C. J. (October 21, 2011). "College Point, Queens/Living In - Attention, Shore Lovers". The New York Times. Retrieved February 23, 2019.
  23. ^ Rhoades, Liz (May 6, 2010). "Riverview listed as a Superfund site". Queens Chronicle. Retrieved February 23, 2019.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "Flushing and Whitestone (Including Auburndale, Bay Terrace, College Point, East Flushing, Flushing, Queensboro Hill and Whitestone)" (PDF). nyc.gov. NYC Health. 2018. Retrieved March 2, 2019.
  25. ^ a b "2016-2018 Community Health Assessment and Community Health Improvement Plan: Take Care New York 2020" (PDF). nyc.gov. New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. 2016. Retrieved September 8, 2017.
  26. ^ "New Yorkers are living longer, happier and healthier lives". New York Post. June 4, 2017. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  27. ^ "NYC-Queens Community District 7--Flushing, Murray Hill & Whitestone PUMA, NY". Census Reporter. Retrieved July 17, 2018.
  28. ^ "NYPD – 109th Precinct". www.nyc.gov. New York City Police Department. Retrieved October 3, 2016.
  29. ^ "College Point and Flushing – DNAinfo.com Crime and Safety Report". www.dnainfo.com. Retrieved October 6, 2016.
  30. ^ "109th Precinct CompStat Report" (PDF). www.nyc.gov. New York City Police Department. Retrieved July 22, 2018.
  31. ^ Rhodes, Liz (December 22, 2011). "Police Academy rises in Queens". Queens Chronicle. Retrieved 2011-02-11.
  32. ^ Miller, Myles (2015-12-15). "NYPD unveils $1 billion state-of-the-art police academy". New York's PIX11 / WPIX-TV. Retrieved 2017-03-07.
  33. ^ "Engine Company 297/Ladder Company 130". FDNYtrucks.com. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  34. ^ "FDNY Firehouse Listing – Location of Firehouses and companies". NYC Open Data; Socrata. New York City Fire Department. September 10, 2018. Retrieved March 14, 2019.
  35. ^ Finkel, Beth (February 27, 2014). "Guide To Queens Hospitals". Queens Tribune. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  36. ^ "Zip Code 11356, College Point, New York Zip Code Boundary Map (NY)". United States Zip Code Boundary Map (USA). Retrieved March 10, 2019.
  37. ^ "Location Details: Whitestone". USPS.com. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  38. ^ "Location Details: Linden Hill". USPS.com. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  39. ^ "Flushing / Whitestone – QN 07" (PDF). Furman Center for Real Estate and Urban Policy. 2011. Retrieved October 5, 2016.
  40. ^ "St. Fidelis School, College Point, NY 11356, Catholic Elementary School, Grades Nursery through 8th". stfidelis.org. Retrieved 28 May 2015.
  41. ^ "Branch Detailed Info: Poppenhusen". Queens Library. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  42. ^ National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  43. ^ "Weekly List 20181116". U.S. National Park Service. November 16, 2018. Retrieved November 20, 2018.
  44. ^ a b c d Lee, Jennifer 8. (October 20, 2009). "College Point Mansion Is Now a Landmark". City Room. Retrieved February 23, 2019.
  45. ^ Murray, Caryn Eve (May 22, 1998). "Falling to the Onslaught of Time: Nature, neglect take toll on sites". Newsday. p. C5.
  46. ^ "College Point, Queens, Part 2". Forgotten New York. May 12, 2006. Retrieved October 10, 2016.
  47. ^ Queens Crapper. "Queens Crap: Plenty of vacancies at the old Grand View Hotel". queenscrap.blogspot.com. Retrieved 28 May 2015.
  48. ^ "Qns. Tenants Almost Home". New York Post. December 25, 2008.
  49. ^ "1977". The Queens Spin. Queens Tribute. Archived from the original on 2007-09-27. Retrieved 2007-09-03.
  50. ^ See:
  51. ^ "Queens Bus Map" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. December 2017. Retrieved April 24, 2018.
  52. ^ Transportation, New York (N Y. ) Board of (1943). Proceedings. The Board.
  53. ^ "Whitestone Branch of LIRR". lirrhistory.com.
  54. ^ Keys, Lisa. "At Home with … Steve Karsay – No. 31's Flavor", New York Post, August 14, 2004. Accessed October 10, 2016. "The reliever grew up in a small two-bedroom in College Point, Queens. It’s only a little more than 10 miles away, but light years away in spirit."

Further reading

Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr.

Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. (born September 22, 1951) is an American journalist. Sulzberger became the publisher of The New York Times in 1992, and chairman of The New York Times Company in 1997, succeeding his father, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger. On December 14, 2017, he announced he would be ceding the post of publisher to his son, Arthur Gregg "A.G." Sulzberger, effective January 1, 2018.

Berliner (format)

Berliner, or "midi", is a newspaper format with pages normally measuring about 315 by 470 millimetres (12.4 in × 18.5 in). The Berliner format is slightly taller and marginally wider than the tabloid/compact format; and is both narrower and shorter than the broadsheet format.

Broadsheet

A broadsheet is the largest newspaper format and is characterized by long vertical pages (typically 22 inches or 56 centimetres).

Other common newspaper formats include the smaller Berliner and tabloid/compact formats.

College Point

College Point may refer to a place in the United States:

College Point, Florida, part of the city of Lynn Haven

College Point, Queens, New York

Conrad Poppenhusen

Conrad Poppenhusen (April 1, 1818 – December 12, 1883) was a German American businessman. He was also a philanthropist, a founder of College Point, Queens, and the founder of the first free kindergarten in the United States (on July 1, 1870).

Flushing Bay

Flushing Bay is a tidal embayment in New York City. It is located on the south side of the East River and stretches to the south near the neighborhood of Flushing, Queens. It is bordered on the west by LaGuardia Airport and the Grand Central Parkway, on the south by Northern Boulevard, and on the east by the neighborhood of College Point. The Flushing River empties into the bay at its southeast corner. A 150-foot-wide navigational channel (46 m) dredged at a depth of 14 feet (4.3 m) runs along much of the bay's length.

G. Arthur Cooper

Gustav Arthur Cooper (February 9, 1902 – October 17, 2000) was an American paleobiologist.

Cooper was born in College Point, Queens and attended Colgate University. He graduated in 1924, staying on to receive a master's degree in 1926. He then attended Yale University where he received his PhD. in 1929. His dissertation was titled, "Stratigraphy of the Hamilton Group of New York."

In 1930, he got a job as Assistant Curator at the Division of Stratigraphic Paleontology in United States National Museum. He was promoted to a Curator position in 1944 for the Division of Invertebrate Paleontology. In 1957, he became the Head Curator of the Department of Geology, and 6 years later became the chairman of the newly formed Department of Paleobiology. He became Senior Paleobiologist in 1967, after which he devoted his life to research. He retired in 1974 with Paleobiologist Emeritus title. He died in 2000.

Harlem Yacht Club

The Harlem Yacht Club, currently based on City Island in the New York City borough of The Bronx and incorporated in 1883, is the third oldest continuously functioning yacht club in the City of New York, the first being The New York Yacht Club (founded in 1844, and currently active in Manhattan and in Newport, Rhode Island), and followed by the Williamsburgh Yacht Club (founded in 1871 in Brooklyn, and currently still active in College Point, Queens). The club currently has over 100 enrolled members in various membership categories.

Henry Baerer

Henry Baerer (1837-1908) was an American sculptor born in Munich, Germany.Works include:

two versions of the Puck magazine mascot on the Puck Building, New York (1886)

Bronze bust of Beethoven for a monument in Central Park (1894)

Nearly identical bust in Prospect Park

Bust of John Howard Payne in Prospect Park, Brooklyn

Statue of Edward Brush Fowler in Fort Greene Park, Brooklyn

Bust of Franz Schubert in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia

Bronze statue of G. K. Warren Prize in Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn, New York

Bronze statue of Conrad Poppenhusen in College Point, Queens, New York

Ideal Toy Company

Ideal Toy Company was an American toy company founded by Morris and Rose Michtom. During the post–World War II baby boom era, Ideal became the largest doll-making company in the United States. Their most popular dolls included Betsy Wetsy, Toni, Saucy Walker, Shirley Temple, Miss Revlon, Patti Playpal, Tammy, Thumbelina, Tiny Thumbelina, and Crissy. Their last big hit was the Rubik's Cube.

James M. Shuart

James M. Shuart (c. 1931 – May 13, 2016) was the president of Hofstra University from 1976 to 2001. Prior to that he served as a Nassau County, New York official. Also, he served as Assistant President to Hofstra President Clifford Lord during the 1960s in addition to serving as an administrator in the division and then school of education. The school's James M. Shuart Stadium is named after him.

He grew up in College Point, Queens graduated from Flushing High School in 1949 and went to Hofstra on a football scholarship. After graduating, he married his college sweetheart, Marjorie Strunk, and was immediately drafted into the Army, where he served as a counterintelligence officer in postwar Korea. After his discharge, he worked as an insurance agent before landing a job in the Hofstra admissions office in 1959.Shuart died at the age of 85 on May 13, 2016 from cardiovascular disease.

List of New York City Designated Landmarks in Queens

source: [1]; [2]; date listed is date of designation;

List of gliders (P)

This is a list of gliders/sailplanes of the world, (this reference lists all gliders with references, where available)

Note: Any aircraft can glide for a short time, but gliders are designed to glide for longer.

New York City Police Academy

The New York City Police Academy is the police academy of the New York City Police Department (NYPD).

Within the organization of the New York City Police Department, the Chief of Training oversees the Training Bureau, which includes the Police Academy as well as other units.

Newsprint

Newsprint is a low-cost, non-archival paper consisting mainly of wood pulp and most commonly used to print newspapers and other publications and advertising material. Invented in 1844 by Charles Fenerty of Nova Scotia, Canada, it usually has an off white cast and distinctive feel. It is designed for use in printing presses that employ a long web of paper (web offset, letterpress and flexographic) rather than individual sheets of paper.

Newsprint is favored by publishers and printers as it is relatively low cost (compared with paper grades used for glossy magazines and sales brochures), strong (to run through modern high-speed web printing presses) and can accept four-color printing at qualities that meet the needs of typical newspapers.

No-Cal

No-Cal was the first zero-calorie soda. It was initially marketed to diabetics in a number of flavors, the most popular being black cherry.

Poppenhusen Institute

Poppenhusen Institute is a historic building at 114—04 14th Road in College Point, Queens that housed the first free kindergarten in America. In addition, this institute provided the first free evening classes for adults (in America). Currently, the Institute operates as a community cultural center. The institute stands at five-stories and was constructed in a stern Victorian style.The Poppenhusen Institute is similar to the Cooper Union Institute in Manhattan: the reason for this is because the so-called "home arts" and the study of machinery were principally taught free to ambitious residents of the North Shore.It was constructed in 1868 with private funds donated by Conrad Poppenhusen, the benefactor of College Point, New York. He began work on the institute on his 50th birthday in 1868, when he provided $100,000 to set up this project as a private educational venture: this venture remains one of the principal features of College Point. Conrad Poppenhusen's zeal, ability, and civic pride brought unprecedented prosperity to College Point.The original charter specified that it be open to all, irrespective of race, creed or religion, giving people the opportunity to improve their lives either by preparing them for better jobs or improving their leisure time. The institute was established for vocational training and is also served in the interests of Poppenhusen to provide educational opportunities for industrial workers. This institute was also built with the purpose of teaching English and factory crafts: even though it was still teaching these classes, the English courses have been supplemented or replaced by those in French and Spanish. The reason for this was because certain individuals felt their English was good enough. In addition, there were more sophisticated classes which taught draftsmanship and machine shop techniques for local workers in electronic plants. Along with these classes, the Poppenhusen Institute contained and provided scientific and historical collections, chemical and philosophical apparatus, books, drawings, pictures, statues, and other such means of education and instruction.The institute housed the Justice of the Peace, the first home of the College Point Savings Bank, German Singing Societies, the first library in the area, a court room, the Sheriff's Office (2 jail cells remain today), as well as the first free kindergarten in the United States which began here on July 1, 1870."Furthermore, this institute was also established for the protection, care, and custody of infants under the age of five years. The institute, to this day, has survived and is well known as a recognized trade school, enrolling about 400 men and women a year for evening classes.The Poppenhusen Institute also became the location in which many historical exhibits and artifacts of Queens were displayed. In 1962, around Spring time in May, the first anniversary of the opening of the College Point Historical Room commenced at the institute and included a new exhibit on "Volunteer Fire Fighting Companies at College Point. Conrad Poppenhusen started the Enterprise Engine Company Two in 1861. A group called the smokeeaters later changed the unit's name to Enterprise Hose Company and established headquarters in the barns adjoining the institute's property on 14th road: this occurred after the engine was retired from service in 1875. The exhibit displayed fire equipment used during the 1800s.

It was added to the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1970 and then added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.

R110B (New York City Subway car)

The R110B (contract order R131) was a prototype class of experimental new technology New York City Subway cars built by Bombardier of Canada for service on the IND and BMT (B Division) services delivered in 1992 and entered service on June 15, 1993 on the A service.

St. Agnes Academic High School (Queens)

St. Agnes Academic High School is an all-girls, private, Roman Catholic high school in Queens, New York. It is located within the Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn, and was established in 1908 by the Sisters of St. Dominic.St. Agnes held its first graduation for 6 students in 1912. The school was originally co-educational, but in the post World War two years, changed to an all girls format. The current building was built in 1958.

St. Agnes is affiliated with the Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C., and is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.

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