College Humor (magazine)

College Humor was an American humor magazine from the 1920s to the 1940s. Published monthly by Collegiate World Publishing,[1] it began in 1920[2] with reprints from college publications and soon introduced new material, including fiction. The headquarters was in Chicago.[1] Contributors included Robert Benchley, Heywood Broun, Groucho Marx, Ellis Parker Butler, Katharine Brush, F. Scott Fitzgerald and Zelda Fitzgerald.[3] Editor H.N. Swanson later became Fitzgerald's Hollywood agent.

The first editor was H. N. Swanson. After he resigned in 1932, managing editor Patricia Reilly took over.[4]

The magazine featured cartoons by Sam Berman, Ralph Fuller, John Held Jr., Otto Soglow and others.

The cover price in 1930 was 35 cents (for 130 pages of content). Dell Publishing acquired the title for a run that began in November, 1934. In the late 1930s, it was purchased by Ned Pines and turned into a girlie magazine. Collegian Press, Inc. was the publisher in the early 1940s.[5]

The magazine was retitled College Humor & Sense for parts of 1933 and 1934. In 1933, Paramount released the college campus musical College Humor with Bing Crosby, Jack Oakie, George Burns and Gracie Allen. College Humor ceased publication in Spring 1943.[6]

College Humor 1925 09
Cover of the September, 1925 issue.

References

  1. ^ a b Patricia Hall. Raggedy Ann and Johnny Gruelle: A Bibliography of Published Works. Pelican Publishing. p. 53. ISBN 978-1-4556-1084-6. Retrieved 28 August 2016.
  2. ^ John T. Hetherington (16 April 2014). Vic and Sade on the Radio: A Cultural History of Paul Rhymer's Daytime Series, 1932-1944. McFarland. p. 11. ISBN 978-0-7864-6303-9. Retrieved 28 August 2016.
  3. ^ See Fitzgerald, F. Scott and Zelda. "The Girl with Talent," College Humor, April 1930.
  4. ^ M. W. Childs, "She Gave Up 'Serious Thinking' and Became an Editor," St. Louis Post-Dispatch, September 4, 1932.
  5. ^ Stephenson-Payne, Phil. Magazine Data File.
  6. ^ "Magazine Issues. College Humor". Magazine Data File. Retrieved 15 January 2019.
1929 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1929 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of two major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Helms Athletic Foundation, College Humor Magazine and the Christy Walsh Syndicate.

1930 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1930 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of two major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Helms Athletic Foundation, College Humor Magazine and the Christy Walsh Syndicate.

1931 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1931 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of two major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Helms Athletic Foundation and College Humor Magazine.

1931 Purdue Boilermakers football team

The 1931 Purdue Boilermakers football team represented Purdue University in the Big Ten Conference (Big Ten) during the 1931 college football season. In their second season under head coach Noble Kizer, the Boilermakers compiled a 9–1 record (5–1 against Big Ten opponents), shut out six of ten opponents, suffered its sole loss to Wisconsin, tied with Michigan for the Big Ten championship, and outscored opponents by a combined total of 192 to 39. The team was recognized as national co-champion by Parke H. Davis.

End Paul Moss and center Ookie Miller were both recognized as first-team All-Americans. Moss received first-team honors from Liberty magazine, and Miller received the same from the United Press and College Humor magazine. Five Purdue players received honors on the 1931 All-Big Ten Conference football team: Paul Moss from the Associated Press (AP), United Press (UP), and captains' team (CPT); Ookie Miller (AP-2, UP-1); quarterback Paul Pardonner (UP-2); halfback Jim Purvis (CPT); and halfback Fred Hecker (AP-2, UP-2).

1932 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1932 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of three major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Helms Athletic Foundation, Converse and College Humor Magazine.

1933 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1933 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of three major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Helms Athletic Foundation, Converse and College Humor Magazine.

1936 NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The consensus 1936 College Basketball All-American team, as determined by aggregating the results of three major All-American teams. To earn "consensus" status, a player must win honors from a majority of the following teams: the Helms Athletic Foundation, Converse and College Humor Magazine.

Asa Smith Bushnell III

Asa Smith Bushnell III (February 2, 1900 – March 22, 1975) was the first commissioner (initially titled executive director) of the Eastern College Athletic Conference, serving from 1938 to 1970, and was board member (1945 to 1970) and secretary of the United States Olympic Committee, editing, co-editing and/or writing "Olympic Books" at least from 1948 to 65. He graduated from Princeton University in 1921, and a prize in his name is awarded to the Ivy League football player of the year.Bushnell was not an athlete himself, and in college another of his interests was expressed in his editorship of the college humor magazine, The Tiger. In this role, he chose to reject submissions from recent alumnus F. Scott Fitzgerald 1917, "one of his few missteps" according to a later alumni magazine profile, which also said he nonetheless became a friend of Fitzgerald's. Bushnell also edited the alumni magazine for five years (1925–1930) before moving full-time to athletic administration.

California Pelican

The California Pelican was a college humor magazine founded in 1903 by Earle C. Anthony at the University of California, Berkeley. Lasting eighty years, it was the first successful student humor magazine in UC Berkeley, though it was preceded by Smiles in 1891 and Josh in 1895. It is succeeded by the Heuristic Squelch, which is still running.

College humor magazines

Many colleges and universities publish satirical journals conventionally referred to as "humor magazines." Among the most famous: the Harvard Lampoon, which gave rise to the National Lampoon in 1970, The Yale Record, the nation's oldest college humor magazine (founded in 1872), Princeton Tiger Magazine, the University of Pennsylvania Punch Bowl, which was founded in 1899, the Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern, founded in 1908, and The Brown Jug, founded in 1920. Many of these publications have a rich and illustrious history, although the genre peaked in the 1970s and some journals now survive only in their online format.

Notable contemporary mentions are Arizona's The Pothole, Syracuse's The Kumquat The Emory Spoke and The Fourth Crown, three of the few college humor magazines founded after the American Civil Rights Movement. The newest publication below is The Radish, an online satirical magazine founded at Washington and Lee University in the United States.

Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern

The Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern (also known as the Jacko) is a college humor magazine, founded at Dartmouth College in 1908.

Josh Lieb

Josh Lieb (born 1972) is the former producer and showrunner of The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon. His credits include stints as executive producer of NewsRadio and The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. During his time at The Daily Show, Lieb was named on seven Primetime Emmys that the show won.In 2009, he published a young adult novel, I Am a Genius of Unspeakable Evil and I Want to Be Your Class President, which was a New York Times Best Seller.Lieb was raised in Columbia, South Carolina, and graduated from Harvard, where he was an editor of The Harvard Lampoon, the college humor magazine. After graduation, he found work writing for Twisted Puppet Theater, The Jon Stewart Show and NewsRadio. He subsequently worked as a producer or consultant on shows including The Simpsons, Drawn Together, Sirens, Nikki, I Hate My Teenage Daughter and Late Night with Jimmy Fallon.Lieb’s tenure at The Daily Show lasted from 2006 to 2010, during which he also served as executive producer of the Rally to Restore Sanity and/or Fear and as co-editor and co-author of Earth: The Book.In 2013, he wrote and directed a series of comedic shorts to raise money and awareness for the charity Water.org. Stars featured in the shorts included Matt Damon, Jessica Biel, Sir Richard Branson, and Bono.Penguin/Random House has announced plans to release Lieb’s second novel, Ratscalibur, in 2015.

Keggy the Keg

Keggy the Keg is the unofficial mascot of Dartmouth College, an Ivy League university in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States. Keggy is an anthropomorphic beer keg, created in 2003 by members of the college humor magazine the Dartmouth Jack-O-Lantern, to fill the mascot void that followed the abolition of the Indian mascot in 1971. Due to its nature, the mascot was controversial on Dartmouth's campus, and it was reported on in a variety of national media. With time, however, it has become an "ingrained part of Dartmouth culture".

Lunatic (disambiguation)

"Lunatic" is a commonly used term for a person who is mentally ill, dangerous, foolish, unpredictable; a condition once called lunacy.

Lunatic may also refer to:

Lunatic (Booba album), 2010 album by French rapper Booba

Lunatic (Kongos album), 2012/14 album by South African rock band Kongos

Lunatic (group), a French hip-hop duo, consisted of Ali and Booba

Lunatic (novel), a 2009 novel by Ted Dekker

Lunatic Lake, a lake in Alaska, U.S.

The Cornell Lunatic, a college humor magazine at Cornell University

"Lunatic", a single by Gazebo

"Lunatic", a song by Dolores O'Riordan

"Lunatic", a song by Static-X from Cult of Static

Lunatics (painting), a painting by Odd Nerdrum

NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans

The NCAA Men's Basketball All-American teams are teams made up of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) basketball players voted the best in the country by a variety of organizations.

Princeton Tiger Magazine

Princeton Tiger or Tiger Magazine is a college humor magazine published by Princeton University undergraduates since 1882.

Ski-U-Mah (magazine)

Ski-U-Mah (pronounced sky-you-ma), was the college humor magazine of the University of Minnesota (and named for a U. of M. sports cheer) from about early 1920s to 1950. The magazine was affiliated to the Sigma Delta Chi fraternity in the university. It was modeled on Harvard Lampoon.Its most prominent writer was Max Shulman, who later wrote the stories that became the television program The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis.

The Brown Jug

The Brown Jug (also known as The Jug) is a college humor magazine founded in 1920 at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island.

The Cornell Lunatic

The Cornell Lunatic is a college humor magazine at Cornell University founded on April 1, 1978, by Joey Green. During Green’s tenure as editor, the Lunatic was a 72 page glossy magazine of satire and parody published once a semester. The Lunatic staff was responsible for many pranks on campus, including a parody of the 1979 Cornell–Yale Homecoming Football Game program. Today, the Lunatic continues to publish once a semester, and the magazine is distributed on campus for free.

Famous alumni from the magazine include science fiction novelist Adam-Troy Castro, CSI producer Naren Shankar, and Harvard economics professor Sendhil Mullainathan.

On March 29, 2008, more than fifty Lunatic alumni and guests gathered at the Cornell Club in Manhattan to celebrate the Lunatic's 30th anniversary and the publication of the book Lunacy: The Best of the Cornell Lunatic.

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