College Football Hall of Fame

The College Football Hall of Fame is a hall of fame and interactive attraction devoted to college football. The National Football Foundation (NFF) founded the Hall in 1951 to immortalize the players and coaches of college football.

From 1995 to 2012, the Hall was located in South Bend, Indiana.

In August 2014, the Chick-fil-A College Football Hall of Fame opened in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. The facility is a 94,256 square feet (8,756.7 m2) attraction located in the heart of Atlanta's sports, entertainment and tourism district, and is adjacent to the Georgia World Congress Center and Centennial Olympic Park.[1]

College Football Hall of Fame
College Football Hall of Fame logo
College Football Hall of Fame building
Exterior of the current College Football Hall of Fame
EstablishedAugust 23, 2014
Location250 Marietta St. NW
Atlanta, Georgia 30313
Coordinates33°45′38″N 84°23′44″W / 33.760442°N 84.395564°W
TypeCollege sports hall of fame
Visitors250,000
DirectorDennis Adamovich
CuratorKent Stephens
Websitewww.cfbhall.com

Coordinates: 33°45′37.59″N 84°23′44.03″W / 33.7604417°N 84.3955639°W

History

Early plans and locations

South-bend-college-football-hall-of-fame
College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Ind. featured a newly installed Sprinturf artificial turf field. The South Bend location closed on Dec. 31, 2012.
College-football-hall-of-fame-side
College Football Hall of Fame side entrance.
South-bend-college-football-hall-of-fame-blocking
Blocking activity cage.

Original plans in 1967[2] called for the Hall of Fame to be located at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, the location of the first contest under rules now considered to be those of modern football, between teams from Rutgers and the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University; Rutgers won 6–4. Rutgers donated land near its football stadium, office space, and administrative support. After years of collecting donations for the construction of the building with ground not having been broken and no plans to do so, the New Jersey Attorney General began an investigation of the finances of the Hall of Fame's foundation, the National Football Foundation. In response, the Foundation moved its operations to New York City, where it continued to collect donations for several years.

When the New York Attorney General's office began its own investigation, the foundation moved to Kings Mills, Ohio in suburban Cincinnati, where a building finally was constructed adjacent to Kings Island in 1978. The Hall opened with good attendance figures early on, but visitation dwindled dramatically as time went on, and the facility closed in 1992. Nearby Galbreath Field remained open as the home of Moeller High School football until 2003.[3]

A new building was opened in South Bend, Indiana, on August 25, 1995. Despite estimates that the South Bend location would attract more than 150,000 visitors a year, the Hall of Fame drew about 115,000 people the first year,[4] and about 80,000 annually after that.[5] It closed in 2012.

Move to Atlanta

In 2009, the National Football Foundation decided to move the College Football Hall of Fame to Atlanta, Georgia. The possibility of moving the museum has been brought up in other cities, including Dallas, which had the financial backing of billionaire T. Boone Pickens.[6] However, the National Football Foundation ultimately decided on Atlanta for the next site. The new $68.5 million museum opened on August 23, 2014.[7] It is located next to Centennial Olympic Park, which is near other attractions such as the Georgia Aquarium, the World of Coca-Cola, CNN Center, and the National Center for Civil and Human Rights.[8][9] The Hall of Fame is located near the Georgia Institute of Technology of the ACC and roughly 70 miles (110 km) from the University of Georgia of the SEC. The new building broke ground on January 28, 2013.[10] Sections of the architecture are reminiscent of a football in shape.

The facility is 94,256 square feet (8,756.7 m2) and contains approximately 50,000 square feet (4,600 m2) of exhibit and event space, interactive displays and a 45-yard indoor football field.[11][12] Atlanta Hall Management operates the College Football Hall of Fame.[10]

Inductees

As of 2018, there are 997 players and 217 coaches enshrined in the College Football Hall of Fame, representing 308 schools.[13] Thirteen players, two coaches and one inanimate object (the Goodyear Blimp)[14] are slated for induction in 2019.[15]

Players by school

Institution Players inducted
Notre Dame 47
USC 44
Michigan 32
Tennessee 28
Ohio State 25
Yale 25
Army 24
Princeton 24
Alabama 20
Navy 20
Oklahoma 20
Penn State 19
Harvard 18
Minnesota 18
Nebraska 18
Penn 18
Pittsburgh 18
Stanford 18
Syracuse 17
Texas 17
California 16
Northwestern 15
Washington 15
Georgia 14
Georgia Tech 14
Wisconsin 13
Florida 12
Illinois 12
Michigan State 12
Purdue 11
Texas A&M 10
Iowa 9

Criteria for induction

The National Football Foundation outlines specific criteria that may be used for evaluating a possible candidate for induction into the Hall of Fame.[16]

  1. A player must have received major first team All-America recognition.
  2. A player becomes eligible for consideration 10 years after his last year of intercollegiate football played.
  3. Football achievements are considered first, but the post-football record as a citizen is also weighed.
  4. Players must have played their last year of intercollegiate football within the last 50 years.
  5. The nominee must have ended his professional athletic career prior to the time of the nomination.
  6. Coaches must have at least 10 years of head coaching experience, coached 100 games, and had at least a .600 winning percentage.[17]

The eligibility criteria have changed over time, and have occasionally led to criticism. Dennis Dodd of CBSSports.com has said,

The NFF election process is arcane and confusing. Based on current rules, Notre Dame's Joe Montana will never be in the College Football Hall of Fame. He was never an All-American on a team recognized by the NCAA. If that sounds outrageous, consider that at one time hall of famers had to actually graduate. (emphasis in original)[18]

References

  1. ^ "Hours, Directions & Parking Info - College Football Hall of Fame". www.cfbhall.com. Retrieved 2017-07-07.
  2. ^ "VSBA NATIONAL COLLEGE FOOTBALL HALL OF FAME COMPETITION" (PDF). 1967. Retrieved June 5, 2013.
  3. ^ Rohrer, Jim (2011-08-09). "College Football Hall of Fame not enough to bring fortune to Mason". Cincinnati Enquirer. Archived from the original on 2014-04-15.
  4. ^ Lesar, Al (2012-12-30). "Hall of Fame Curator Here from Beginning to End". South Bend Tribune. Retrieved 2013-01-02.
  5. ^ "Hall moving from South Bend to Atlanta". Associated Press. September 23, 2009. Retrieved March 2, 2013.
  6. ^ "Hall hoping to open new building in 2012". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Atlanta, Georgia: Associated Press. September 24, 2009. Retrieved March 2, 2013.
  7. ^ "History of the Hall - College Football Hall of Fame". www.cfbhall.com. Retrieved 2017-07-07.
  8. ^ Lesar, Al (2012-07-22). "Hall to Be Gone by December". South Bend Tribune. Retrieved 2012-07-24.
  9. ^ "Hall hoping to open new building in 2012". September 24, 2009. Retrieved March 2, 2013.
  10. ^ a b "Stephenson to lead development of College Football Hall of Fame". Atlanta Business Chronicle. February 4, 2013. Retrieved May 14, 2013.
  11. ^ "Interactivity at Core of Football Hall Design". Civil Engineering. March 19, 2013. Archived from the original on December 18, 2013. Retrieved May 14, 2013.
  12. ^ "Slideshow: Jan. 28 groundbreaking set for College Football Hall of Fame". Atlanta Business Chronicle. December 31, 2012. Retrieved May 14, 2013.
  13. ^ "National Football Foundation - College Football Hall of Fame". National Football Foundation. Retrieved February 21, 2017.
  14. ^ "Goodyear Blimp Named Honorary Member of College Football Hall of Fame". National Football Foundation. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  15. ^ "NFF Announces Legendary 2019 College Football Hall of Fame Class". National Football Foundation. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  16. ^ "Inductees - Football Players & Coaches - College Football Hall of Fame". www.cfbhall.com. Retrieved 2017-07-07.
  17. ^ "Inductees Selection Process". College Football Hall of Fame.
  18. ^ Dodd, Dennis. "2014 College Football Hall of Fame Ballot Released: Latest Details and Reaction". Bleacher Report. Retrieved February 21, 2017.

External links

Alfred Williams

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Art Shell

Arthur Lee Shell Jr. (born November 26, 1946) is an American former collegiate and professional football player in the American Football League and later in the National Football League, a Hall of Fame offensive tackle, and a two-time former head coach of the Oakland Raiders. He holds the distinction of becoming the second African-American head coach in the history of professional football, and the first in the sport's modern era. Shell was inducted to the College Football Hall of Fame in 2013 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1989.

Bob Brown (offensive lineman)

Robert Stanford Brown (born December 8, 1941), nicknamed "The Boomer" is a former American football offensive tackle in the National Football League from 1964 through 1973. He was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles as the second overall pick in the 1964 NFL draft. He played for the Eagles from 1964 to 1968, the Los Angeles Rams from 1969 to 1970, and the Oakland Raiders from 1971 to 1973. He played college football at Nebraska. Brown was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1993 and the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2004.

Bobby Bell

Bobby Lee Bell Sr (born June 17, 1940) is a former professional American football linebacker and defensive end. He is a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame, the College Football Hall of Fame, and was a member of the Chiefs' team that won Super Bowl IV against the Minnesota Vikings.

Charlie Krueger

Charles Andrew Krueger (born January 28, 1937) is a former American football player, a defensive tackle for fifteen seasons in the National Football League, all with the San Francisco 49ers. In college, he was a two-time All-American at Texas A&M and was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1982.

Dave Butz

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Derrick Thomas

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After the conclusion of the Chiefs' 1999 season, Thomas was involved in a car accident during the 1999–2000 NFL playoffs that left him paralyzed from the chest down. Days later, he died from a blood clot that developed in his paralyzed legs and traveled to his lungs, causing a pulmonary embolism. Thomas was posthumously inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2009 and the College Football Hall of Fame in 2014.

Jack Ham

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Jim Parker (American football)

James Thomas Parker (April 3, 1934 – July 18, 2005) was an American football player. He played college football at Ohio State University from 1954 to 1956 and in the National Football League (NFL) with the Baltimore Colts from 1957 to 1967. Parker was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1973 and the College Football Hall of Fame in 1974.

John Hannah (American football)

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List of Alabama Crimson Tide players in the College Football Hall of Fame

The Alabama Crimson Tide college football team competes as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), and represents the University of Alabama in the Western Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). The College Football Hall of Fame was established in 1951 to honor the careers of selected student-athletes who have competed in college football as either a player or coach. Since its inaugural class that year, Alabama has had 23 persons elected to the Hall of Fame as either a player or coach of the Crimson Tide.The first Alabama inductees into the Hall of Fame were Don Hutson and Frank Thomas as part of the inaugural class in 1951. The most recent inductee was Derrick Thomas as part of the 2014 class.

Loyd Phillips

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As a defensive tackle at Arkansas, Phillips was selected first team All-America in both the 1965 and 1966 seasons. He was selected by the Associated Press, United Press International, Central Press, American Football Coaches Association, and the Walter Camp Foundation in 1965. In 1966, he was selected by the Associated Press, United Press International, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Central Press Association, American Football Coaches Association, Walter Camp Foundation, Football Writers Association of America, Sporting News and Time Magazine in 1966. Phillips was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1992.

Ozzie Newsome

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Pat Harder

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Ricky Bell (running back)

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Ron Yary

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Sterling Sharpe

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Wayne Harris

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Willie Roaf

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