Colfax, California

Colfax (formerly, Alden Grove, Alder Grove, Illinoistown, and Upper Corral) is a city in Placer County, California,[4] at the crossroads of Interstate 80 and State Route 174. It is part of the SacramentoArden-ArcadeRoseville Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 1,963 at the 2010 census. The town is named in honor of U.S. Vice President Schuyler Colfax (1869–73), a bronze statue of whom stands at Railroad Street and Grass Valley Street.[6] (This is the only known statue of Schuyler Colfax in the United States[7]).

Some of the town's notable features include the newly restored Southern Pacific Railroad colonnade-style depot (which houses the Colfax Museum and Chamber of Commerce) built in 1905,[8] the downtown shops on Main Street, and Colfax High School, which serves a large surrounding area.

Colfax, California
The historic Stevens Trail's trailhead is in Colfax
The historic Stevens Trail's trailhead is in Colfax
Location of Colfax in Placer County, California.
Location of Colfax in Placer County, California.
Colfax, California is located in the United States
Colfax, California
Colfax, California
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 39°5′50″N 120°57′14″W / 39.09722°N 120.95389°WCoordinates: 39°5′50″N 120°57′14″W / 39.09722°N 120.95389°W
Country United States
State California
CountyPlacer
IncorporatedFebruary 23, 1910[1]
Government
 • MayorJoe Fatula[2]
 • Mayor Pro TemMarnie Mendoza[2]
 • CouncilmemberTrinity Burruss[2]
 • CouncilmemberKim Douglas[2]
 • CouncilmemberSean Loman[2]
Area
 • Total1.41 sq mi (3.64 km2)
 • Land1.41 sq mi (3.64 km2)
 • Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)  0%
Elevation2,425 ft (739 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total1,963
 • Estimate 
(2016)[5]
2,004
 • Density1,425.32/sq mi (550.32/km2)
Time zoneUTC-8 (Pacific)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-7 (PDT)
ZIP code
95713
Area code(s)530
FIPS code06-14498
GNIS feature ID1655912
Websitewww.colfax-ca.gov

History

Originally inhabited by the Maidu and Miwok Indians, by the mid-19th century the city site was known as Alder Grove; however, as development increased, the city became known as Illinoistown, a supply hub for gold mining camps.[9] In April 1852, the Reelfoot Williams Gang robbed a Nevada City stagecoach of $7,000 in gold bullion near Illinoistown. This was the first stagecoach robbery in the gold country.[10][11]

Later it was renamed Colfax after then Speaker of the House (and later Vice President) Schuyler Colfax who visited the town in 1865 while inspecting progress of construction of the Central Pacific Railroad, the western portion of the first transcontinental railroad. The city was the southern terminus of the Nevada County Narrow Gauge Railroad from 1876 until the railroad’s removal in 1942. Historic U.S. Route 40 also runs through the city as well as the more modern Interstate 80. The city is mentioned in Jules Verne’s book, Around the World in Eighty Days.

In July 2015 the Lowell Fire burned thousands of acres nearby, forcing evacuation in Nevada County.[9]

Geography

Colfax is located at 39°5′50″N 120°57′14″W / 39.09722°N 120.95389°W (39.097260, -120.954017).[12] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.4 square miles (3.6 km2), all of it land.

The principal geologic structures present are granitic and metamorphic rock formations. Located approximately 1 mile (1.6 km) west of Colfax is a branch of the Melones Fault, running in north to south direction. The fault runs through the old grammar school baseball field so they closed the school. (Earth Metrics, 1989) Another branch of the same fault is located about 1.2 miles (1.9 km) to the east, also aligned in a north-south orientation. No movement has been recorded by the U.S. Geological Survey, and the faults are considered inactive. Bunch Creek is an active water source flowing south to eventually reach a confluence with the North Fork of the American River.

Colfax sits a few miles outside the Tahoe National Forest as I-80 begins its climb into the Sierra's. Because of its location it is considered at high risk of wildfire.[9]

Climate

Colfax has a hot-summer Mediterranean climate (Köppen Csa) that is characterized by cool, wet winters and hot, dry summers. Summers can be quite hot, especially in the months of July/August where temperatures easily reach 90 °F (32 °C) with plenty of sunshine. Winters on the other hand are quite cool with temperatures in December hovering around 46 °F (8 °C), and owing to its altitude above sea level, Colfax some years sees snow accumulation.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880591
189067013.4%
1910621
1920573−7.7%
193091259.2%
1940794−12.9%
19508203.3%
196091511.6%
1970798−12.8%
198098122.9%
19901,30633.1%
20001,49614.5%
20101,96331.2%
Est. 20162,004[5]2.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[13]

2010

The 2010 United States Census[14] reported that Colfax had a population of 1,963. The population density was 1,394.7 people per square mile (538.5/km²). The racial makeup of Colfax was 1,759 (89.6%) White, 4 (0.2%) African American, 26 (1.3%) Native American, 29 (1.5%) Asian, 2 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 54 (2.8%) from other races, and 89 (4.5%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 178 persons (9.1%).

The Census reported that 1,958 people (99.7% of the population) lived in households, 5 (0.3%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 0 (0%) were institutionalized.

There were 823 households, out of which 286 (34.8%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 334 (40.6%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 131 (15.9%) had a female householder with no husband present, 40 (4.9%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 67 (8.1%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 3 (0.4%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 259 households (31.5%) were made up of individuals and 90 (10.9%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38. There were 505 families (61.4% of all households); the average family size was 2.98.

The population was spread out with 499 people (25.4%) under the age of 18, 159 people (8.1%) aged 18 to 24, 501 people (25.5%) aged 25 to 44, 580 people (29.5%) aged 45 to 64, and 224 people (11.4%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.9 years. For every 100 females, there were 92.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.3 males.

There were 929 housing units at an average density of 660.1 per square mile (254.9/km²), of which 386 (46.9%) were owner-occupied, and 437 (53.1%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 4.0%; the rental vacancy rate was 12.5%. 895 people (45.6% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 1,063 people (54.2%) lived in rental housing units.

2000

As of the census[15] of 2000, there were 1,496 people, 614 households, and 394 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,141.0 people per square mile (440.9/km²). There were 636 housing units at an average density of 485.1 per square mile (187.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.18% White, 0.60% Black or African American, 0.60% Native American, 0.13% Asian, 2.34% from other races, and 3.14% from two or more races. 8.29% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 614 households out of which 35.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.0% were married couples living together, 15.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.7% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.97.

Schuyler Colfax Statue
A statue of the town's namesake U.S. Vice President Schuyler Colfax stands near the railroad station in history downtown Colfax.
East portal of Tunnel 34, view to south-southwest, 135mm lens with electronic flash fill. Note the shift, in these later tunnels east of Colfax, to concrete portal faces with HAER CAL,31-COLF.V,1-3
East portal of Tunnel 34, Colfax, on the historic Central Pacific Railroad.

In the city, the population was spread out with 28.5% under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 28.4% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.2 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $37,391, and the median income for a family was $43,125. Males had a median income of $37,500 versus $27,708 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,440. About 8.5% of families and 12.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.1% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those over 64.

Transportation

Amtrak, the national passenger rail system, provides service to Colfax. The city's passenger rail station is located at 99 Railroad Street in the heart of town. Amtrak Train 5, the westbound California Zephyr, is scheduled to depart Colfax at 11:48am daily with service to Roseville, Sacramento, Davis, Martinez, and Emeryville across the bay from San Francisco. Amtrak Train 6, the eastbound California Zephyr, is scheduled to depart Colfax at 12:21pm daily with service to Truckee, Reno, Sparks, Winnemucca, Elko, Salt Lake City, Provo, Helper, Green River, Grand Junction, Glenwood Springs, Denver, Omaha, Galesburg, and Chicago.[16] A bronze statue of the town's namesake, Schuyler Colfax, stands near the depot at the Grass Valley Street railroad grade crossing.

Books

References

  1. ^ "California Cities by Incorporation Date". California Association of Local Agency Formation Commissions. Archived from the original (Word) on November 3, 2014. Retrieved August 25, 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Colfax City Council". The City of Colfax, California. Retrieved January 31, 2015.
  3. ^ "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 19, 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Colfax". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey. Retrieved November 4, 2014.
  5. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  6. ^ Statue of Schuyler Colfax, Vice President of the US (1869-73), Colfax, CA
  7. ^ Sierra Nevada Geotourism MapGuide
  8. ^ Bender, Henry E., Jr. (2013). Southern Pacific Lines Standard-Design Depots. Berkeley and Wilton, California: Signature Press. p. 241. ISBN 9781930013339.
  9. ^ a b c Ryan Sabalow; Phillip Reese; Dale Kasler (April 14, 2019). "A real life gamble: California races to predict which town could be the next victim". Destined to Burn. Reno Gazette Journal. The Sacramento Bee. p. 1A.
  10. ^ Alvin Fay Harlow, Old Waybills: the romance of the express companies, Arno Press,Inc., 1976,(reprint edition of the original 1934 edition), p.184
  11. ^ Chauncey L. Canfield, The diary of a forty-niner, M. Shepard Co., 1906 pp. 184-185, 192-194
  12. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  13. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  14. ^ "2010 Census Interactive Population Search: CA - Colfax city". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved July 12, 2014.
  15. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  16. ^ "California Zephyr Schedule" (PDF). Amtrak. Retrieved 9 December 2012.

External links

Bunch Creek

Bunch Creek is a stream in Placer County, California, United States. Bunch Creek is a tributary to the North Fork of the American River, which confluence is to the east at 920 feet (280 m) elevation. In reaching that confluence, Brush Creek flows through Bunch Canyon. The water quality in Bunch Creek is characterized by low turbidity, and is free of odor; trout were being caught in the creek according to a 1989 survey.(Earth Metrics, 1989)

California's 1st State Assembly district

California's 1st State Assembly district is one of 80 California State Assembly districts. Its seat in the legislature is currently vacant. It was represented by Republican Brian Dahle of Bieber until June 2019, when he resigned after being elected to represent the 1st Senate District in a special election. A special election primary to fill this seat was held on August 27, 2019, with the general election to occur on November 5, 2019.

California's 4th congressional district

California's 4th congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of California.

Tom McClintock, a Republican, has represented the district since January 2009. Currently, the 4th district encompasses the Sierra from Truckee to the Sequoia National Forest. It consists of Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado, Mariposa, and Tuolumne counties plus portions of Fresno, Madera, Nevada, and Placer counties. Prior to redistricting by the California Citizens Redistricting Commission of 2011, the 4th district encompassed the northeast corner of the state, stretching from the eastern suburbs of Sacramento north to the Oregon border. It consisted of El Dorado, Lassen, Modoc, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, and Sierra counties plus portions of Butte and Sacramento counties.

California State Route 174

State Route 174 (SR 174) is a state highway in the U.S. state of California. The two-lane 13-mile (21 km) highway in the western Sierra Nevada, added to the state highway system in 1933, connects Interstate 80 in Colfax with SR 20/SR 49 in Grass Valley, crossing the Bear River next to a 1924 concrete arch bridge. The majority of the route is eligible for the State Scenic Highway System, but local residents have blocked its designation due to property right concerns.

Cape Horn, Placer County, California

Cape Horn is an unincorporated community in Placer County, California. Cape Horn is on the Southern Pacific Railroad, 2.5 miles (4.0 km) northeast of Colfax. It is at an elevation of 2,654 feet (809 m).

Chicago Park, Placer County, California

Chicago Park is a former settlement in Placer County, California. Chicago Park is located on a narrow-gauge railroad 1 mile (1.6 km) north-northeast of Colfax. It still appeared on maps as of 1934.

Colfax High School (Colfax, California)

Colfax High School is a four-year public high school in Colfax, California in the United States. It is in the Placer Union High School District in Placer County. The school currently serves about 700 students living between Auburn, Grass Valley, and Alta/Dutch Flat. The school itself is located on 40 acres (16 ha) in the Bear River valley north of downtown Colfax and adjacent to Colfax Elementary School.

The student body self-identified as 85.3% white, the average classroom size is 25–27, and there are 3.6 students per computer. Students are also given Chromebooks as of 2014. Ninety-five percent of the teachers have a full credential and the average length of time they have been teaching is 19 years. The graduation rate is 100.0% as of the 2007–2008 academic year.Colfax High's mascot is the falcon, and its school colors are green and white.

Colfax station

Colfax station is an Amtrak train station in Colfax, California. It serves the California Zephyr line. It is unstaffed. The station was built in 1905 by Southern Pacific Railroad and was restored in the early 21st Century; in addition to a waiting room, the building also houses the Colfax Heritage Museum. The platform is movable to accommodate Union Pacific rotary snowplows, which are liable to scrape a platform 8 inches above top of rail.Between January 1, 1998, and February 13, 2000, a single round-trip of the Capitol Corridor terminated at Colfax. This service ended because of low ridership.

The station building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1999 as Colfax Passenger Station, with the 1880-built freight depot listed separately as Colfax Freight Station.

Crispin Hard Cider Company

Crispin Cider is a hard apple cider company based at and produced in Colfax, California. Imported ciders are produced in Tiverton, Devon, England.

Crispin was formerly located in Minneapolis. The company acquired Fox Barrel Cider in 2010. The purchase included its cidery in Colfax where the company is now headquartered. In early 2011, Crispin began importing a dry English cider, Browns Lane (named after the original Jaguar factory in Coventry), from England. In 2012, Crispin was acquired by MillerCoors. The founders of Crispin went on to open Copper & Kings American Brandy in 2014.

Ed Hutchinson

Edwin Forrest Hutchinson (May 19, 1867 – July 19, 1934), was a Major League Baseball player who played second base for the Chicago Colts of the National League. He appeared in four games for the Colts in the 1890 season. He remained active in the minor leagues, mostly in western leagues, through 1906, and was briefly a player/manager for the Spokane Indians in 1906.

At the time of his death he lived in Colfax, California.

Fox Barrel

Fox Barrel is a brand of perry (marketed as "pear cider") made in Colfax, CA.

Iowa Hill, California

Iowa Hill (formerly, Iowa City) is an unincorporated community in Placer County, California. The town is located 6.5 miles northwest of Foresthill 9 miles east of Colfax and 58 miles northeast of Sacramento. It lies at an elevation of 2861 feet. The community relies completely upon solar panels and generators for power. Population is around 200 people. Iowa Hill Road claims a small handful of lives every decade, and along with its "off grid" status, prevents the town from growing in population. The community boasts many hardcore cyclists and is appealing to visitors due to the abundance of recreational opportunities.

Iowa Hill Road is a very steep, one-lane, winding road embedded within the mountains. There are no safety guardrails. Since ambulance service from Colfax takes a long time, emergency medical transport is supplemented by CALSTAR, the area's air rescue helicopter. A landing pad is located next to the town fire house.

Lander Crossing, California

Lander Crossing (also, Lander) is an unincorporated community in Placer County, California. Lander Crossing is located on the Southern Pacific Railroad, 2.5 miles (4.0 km) south-southwest of Colfax. It lies at an elevation of 2300 feet (701 m).The name honors Frederick West Lander, superintendent for the wagon road in 1858.

List of cider brands

This is a list of cider brands. Cider is an alcoholic beverage made exclusively from the juice of apple or pear. This list also includes perry, which is a similar alcoholic beverage made from pear varieties.

Nevada County Narrow Gauge Railroad

The Nevada County Narrow Gauge Railroad (NCNGRR) (nickname: Never Come, Never Go) was located in Northern California's Nevada County and Placer County, where it connected with the Central Pacific Railroad. The Nevada County Narrow Gauge Railroad Company incorporated on April 4, 1874, and was headquartered in Grass Valley, California. After two years of construction, passenger and commercial rail services began in 1876 and continued until 1943. The 22.53 mi (36.26 km) line ran from Colfax, north through Grass Valley to Nevada City. At one time, the railroad was notable for having the highest railroad bridge in California, the Bear River Bridge, built in 1908.

Pinecroft, California

Pinecroft is an unincorporated community in Placer County, California. Pinecroft is located 2 miles (3.2 km) southwest of Colfax. It lies at an elevation of 2047 feet (624 m).

Shady Glen, California

Shady Glen is an unincorporated community in Placer County, California. Shady Glen is located 1.25 miles (2.0 km) north of Colfax. It lies at an elevation of 2451 feet (747 m).

Weimar, California

Weimar (formerly, New England Mills and Weimer) is an unincorporated community in Placer County, California, located in the Sacramento area. Weimar is located 4.5 miles (7.2 km) south-southwest of Colfax.As of 2010, its population is 209.

By car, Weimar is about one hour from Reno, Nevada and about one hour northeast of Sacramento, California on east I-80. It is directly adjacent to Interstate 80. Amtrak stops at Colfax, California which is about 3 miles east on I-80 past Weimar. Weimar, California was originally named New England Mills. The elevation is about 2300–2600 feet.

Weimar has a campground in it, and also has access to the North Fork of the American River. The former Weimar Sanitorium, a Tuberculosis treatment hospital, is now Weimar Institute, home to the NEWSTART Lifestyle Program. The Institute also includes Weimar College, and Weimar Academy, a boarding school for high school students, both associated with the Seventh-day Adventist Church. It is also home to the Weimar Hills Public School, which offers grades 4th through 8th.

The Weimar post office opened in 1866. An explanation of the town's name comes from the Geisendorfer family; descendants of George Geisendorfer, founder of the town. George Geisendorfer was born in the area of Weimar, Germany. Many of the original inhabitants of Weimar (New England Mills) were also of German descent. Members of the town, and the Geisendorfer family, have testified that George Geisendorfer himself decided to rename the town “Weimar” when the post office rejected the original name of New England Mills.Its ZIP code is 95736 and its area code 530.

Weimar Institute

Weimar Institute, formerly known as Weimar Center of Health & Education, is a private educational and health care institution in Weimar, California, United States. It operates a college, academy, and lifestyle-oriented health care center. It highlights traditional Seventh-day Adventist principles of health and education, especially as espoused by early Seventh-day Adventist founder Ellen G. White, who wrote extensively on health and education. Although founded by Adventists, it has never been legally affiliated with the Seventh-day Adventist Church.

Climate data for Colfax, California
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 77
(25)
80
(27)
85
(29)
91
(33)
102
(39)
111
(44)
113
(45)
112
(44)
106
(41)
101
(38)
87
(31)
75
(24)
113
(45)
Average high °F (°C) 51
(11)
53
(12)
57
(14)
62
(17)
71
(22)
80
(27)
88
(31)
87
(31)
81
(27)
70
(21)
56
(13)
50
(10)
67
(20)
Daily mean °F (°C) 43
(6)
45
(7)
48
(9)
50
(10)
60
(16)
68
(20)
75
(24)
74
(23)
68
(20)
59
(15)
48
(9)
43
(6)
57
(14)
Average low °F (°C) 35
(2)
37
(3)
39
(4)
42
(6)
49
(9)
56
(13)
62
(17)
60
(16)
55
(13)
48
(9)
40
(4)
35
(2)
47
(8)
Record low °F (°C) 22
(−6)
21
(−6)
26
(−3)
34
(1)
37
(3)
46
(8)
50
(10)
49
(9)
42
(6)
35
(2)
27
(−3)
20
(−7)
20
(−7)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 7.76
(197)
8.15
(207)
7.05
(179)
3.43
(87)
2.01
(51)
0.59
(15)
0.04
(1.0)
0.12
(3.0)
0.79
(20)
2.56
(65)
6.06
(154)
8.5
(220)
47.06
(1,199)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 1.00
(2.5)
2.00
(5.1)
2.00
(5.1)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
0.00
(0.00)
1.00
(2.5)
2.00
(5.1)
8
(20.3)
Source #1: http://www.myforecast.com/bin/climate.m?city=11624&metric=false
Source #2: http://www.usclimatedata.com/climate/colfax/california/united-states/usca0239/2015/1
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