Coleophora albicosta

The testaceous white-back (Coleophora albicosta) is a moth of the family Coleophoridae. It is found in most of western Europe.

The wingspan is about 14 mm. Head pale ochreous, sides whitish. Antennae white, ringed with fuscous, basal joint ochreous-tinged, with rough spreading scales. Forewings light ochreous-yellowish, sprinkled with light fuscous, especially towards costa ; a white costal streak from base to near apex ; a white line in disc from before middle to termen, one along fold, and one along dorsum to apex. Hindwings grey.[1]

Adults are on wing from June to July. They fly by day, but also sometimes come to light at night.

The larvae feed on Ulex europaeus, at first on green seeds inside a seedpod. It then lives in a detached sepal rolled into a case, which it attaches to the side of a seedpod and bores in to feed on the seeds. Finally, it diapauses full-fed in a silk case in a dead flower and pupates in the overwintering case.

Coleophora albicosta
Coleophora albicosta
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
Class:
Order:
Family:
Genus:
Species:
C. albicosta
Binomial name
Coleophora albicosta
(Haworth, 1828)
Synonyms
  • Porrectaria albicosta Haworth, 1828
  • Coleophora fraudulentella Toll, 1944

Gallery

Britishentomologyvolume6Plate687

Illustration from John Curtis's British Entomology Volume 6

Larva

Coleophora albicosta pod of Ulex europaeus with two larval cases attached

Pod of Ulex europaeus with two larval cases attached

References

  1. ^ Meyrick, E., 1895 A Handbook of British Lepidoptera MacMillan, London pdf This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain. Keys and description

External links

List of Lepidoptera of Germany

The Lepidoptera of Germany consist of both the butterflies and moths recorded from Germany.

List of Lepidoptera of the Netherlands

The Lepidoptera of the Netherlands consist of both the butterflies and moths recorded from the Netherlands.

List of moths of Great Britain (micromoths)

This is a list of microlepidoptera which are found in Great Britain. It also acts as an index to the species articles and forms part of the full List of moths of Great Britain.

List of moths of Ireland

Irish moths represent about 1,400 different types of moths. The moths (mostly nocturnal) and butterflies (mostly diurnal) together make up the taxonomic order Lepidoptera.

This is a list of moth species which have been recorded in Ireland.

List of moths of Italy (A-E)

Italian moths represent about 4,959 different types of moths. The moths (mostly nocturnal) and butterflies (mostly diurnal) together make up the taxonomic order Lepidoptera.

This is a list of moth species (families beginning A-E) which have been recorded in Italy, including San Marino, Sardinia, Sicily and Vatican City.Other parts of the list are at List of moths of Italy

List of moths of Metropolitan France (A–C)

This is a list of moths of families starting from A to C that are found in Metropolitan France (including Corsica). It also acts as an index to the species articles and forms part of the full List of Lepidoptera of Metropolitan France.

List of moths of the Iberian Peninsula (A–F)

There are about 4,454 species of moth in the Iberian Peninsula. The moths (mostly nocturnal) and butterflies (mostly diurnal) together make up the taxonomic order Lepidoptera.

This is a list of moth species which have been recorded in Portugal, Spain and Gibraltar (together forming the Iberian Peninsula). This list also includes species found on the Balearic Islands.

Ulex

Ulex (commonly known as gorse, furze or whin) is a genus of flowering plants in the family Fabaceae. The genus comprises about 20 species of thorny evergreen shrubs in the subfamily Faboideae of the pea family Fabaceae. The species are native to parts of western Europe and northwest Africa, with the majority of species in Iberia.

Gorse is closely related to the brooms, and like them, has green stems and very small leaves and is adapted to dry growing conditions. However it differs in its extreme thorniness, the shoots being modified into branched thorns 1–4 centimetres (0.4–1.6 in) long, which almost wholly replace the leaves as the plant's functioning photosynthetic organs. The leaves of young plants are trifoliate, but in mature plants they are reduced to scales or small spines. All the species have yellow flowers, generally showy, some with a very long flowering season.

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