Cody Pickett

Cody J. Pickett[1] (born June 30, 1980) is a former professional gridiron football quarterback in the National Football League and Canadian Football League. He was selected in the seventh round of the 2004 NFL Draft by the San Francisco 49ers, and played college football at the University of Washington in Seattle.

Cody Pickett
refer to caption
Pickett with Toronto in 2008
No. 3
Position:Quarterback
Personal information
Born:June 30, 1980 (age 38)
Caldwell, Idaho
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:225 lb (102 kg)
Career information
High school:Caldwell (ID)
College:Washington
NFL Draft:2004 / Round: 7 / Pick: 217
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
CFL status:International
Career highlights and awards
  • Washington Offensive MVP (2002)
  • Six college awards & honors
  • Huskies record for touchdown passes (55)
  • Huskies record for pass completions (821)
  • Huskies record for pass attempts (1,429)
Career NFL statistics
TD-INT:0–4
Passing yards:195
QB Rating:16.4
Player stats at NFL.com
Career CFL statistics
TD-INT:4–5
Passing yards:2,163
Player stats at CFL.ca (archive)

Early years

Born and raised in Caldwell, Idaho, Pickett was a four-sport athlete at Caldwell High School and graduated in 1999. He lettered in football, basketball, golf, and rodeo, in which he was a national champion. Originally recruited by Jim Lambright at Washington, Pickett accepted a scholarship from new head coach Rick Neuheisel to play for the Huskies.[2]

Pickett's family home was located off Chicken Dinner Road, near Caldwell.[2][3]

College career

As a true freshman at Washington in 1999, Pickett was the backup to starter Marques Tuiasosopo and saw limited action; he was granted a medical redshirt for an ailing back in the last half of the season. He was the backup again to Tuiasosopo in 2000; the Huskies went 11–1, won the Rose Bowl over Purdue, and finished third in the final polls.

Pickett was the starting quarterback at UW for three seasons from 200103, where his primary target was wide receiver Reggie Williams. Rather than enter the 2003 NFL Draft in the spring, Pickett chose to return to Washington for his senior season at age 23. His senior season saw a head coaching change, as Neuheisel was dismissed in the summer of 2003 and replaced with Keith Gilbertson. He was considered a Heisman Trophy candidate and written up in Sports Illustrated, but a shoulder injury that year hurt his chances.[4]

Awards and honors

  • Honorable mention Academic All-Pac-10 (2000)
  • Honorable mention All-Pac-10 (2001)
  • Huskies Offensive Most Valuable Player (2002)
  • Second-team All-Pac-10 (2002)
  • Honorable mention SI All-American (2002)
  • Honorable mention CollegeFootballNews.com All-American (2002)

Statistics

Year Team Passing Rushing
Cmp Att Pct Yds Y/A TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD
1999 Washington 0 4 0.0 0 0.0 0 1 -50.0 0 0 0.0 0
2000 Washington 1 2 50.0 12 6.0 0 0 100.4 0 0 0.0 0
2001 Washington 169 301 56.1 2,403 8.0 10 14 124.9 83 60 0.7 5
2002 Washington 365 612 59.6 4,458 7.3 28 14 131.4 86 -185 -2.2 3
2003 Washington 257 454 56.6 3,043 6.7 15 13 118.1 80 -60 -0.8 3
Career 792 1,373 57.7 9,916 7.2 53 42 125.0 249 -186 -0.7 11

Source[5]

Professional career

Pickett was selected in the seventh round (217th overall) of the 2004 NFL Draft by the San Francisco 49ers. Pickett started the 2005 season as the fourth-string quarterback, but became the starter after Tim Rattay was traded, and Alex Smith and Ken Dorsey were injured. Pickett played on special teams most of the season, an unusual role for a quarterback. He also played safety and wide receiver during practice.

Pickett QB slide
Pickett demonstrates a quarterback slide at a 2009 Argonauts training camp fan day.

Pickett was traded on July 27, 2006 to the Houston Texans for a conditional draft pick in the 2007 NFL Draft. He was released by the Texans on September 1, 2006. Pickett was selected to the 2007 Rhein Fire NFL Europe team as a free agent and was their starting quarterback.

In July 2007, the Oakland Raiders signed Pickett to a one-year contract, but released him on August 1.

On September 18, 2007, Pickett was signed as a free agent by the Toronto Argonauts of the CFL. Pickett made his first CFL game appearance on September 12, 2008 against the visiting Winnipeg Blue Bombers at Rogers Centre in relief of starting quarterback Kerry Joseph. He made his first CFL start on September 20, 2008, against the Calgary Stampeders at McMahon Stadium.[6][7]

On August 11, 2009, head coach Bart Andrus named Cody Pickett as the starting quarterback for the team's next game, against the B.C. Lions.[8]

On February 21, 2010, Pickett was released by the Argonauts. On March 8, 2010, Pickett was signed by the Montreal Alouettes.[9] On June 7, 2010, Cody Pickett was released by the Montreal Alouettes. On June 15, 2010, Cody Pickett was signed by the Calgary Stampeders.

Following the 2010 CFL season, Pickett retired from pro football and returned to Idaho.[10]

NFL statistics

Year Team GP GS Passing Rushing
Cmp Att Pct Yds Y/A TD Int Rtg Att Yds Avg TD
2004 SF 1 0 4 10 40.0 55 5.5 0 2 18.7 1 5 5.0 0
2005 SF 5 2 14 35 40.0 140 4.0 0 2 28.3 13 42 3.2 0
Career 6 2 18 45 40.0 195 4.3 0 4 16.4 14 47 3.4 0

Source:[11]

Personal life

Pickett's father is Dee Pickett, a championship roper on professional rodeo circuit and the 1984 World Champion Cowboy, inducted into the ProRodeo Hall of Fame in August 2003. Dee also played college football; a junior college transfer, he was the starting quarterback at Boise State in 1976 and 1977.[12][13]

In the offseason, Pickett coached his younger sister's basketball team, Team 208, a travel team representing the Boise, Idaho area. He is the current head coach for the Eagle High School girls basketball team in Eagle, Idaho.

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/P/PickCo00.htm
  2. ^ a b Sherwin, Bob (2005-11-04). "Learning the Ropes of Cowhide and Pigskin". New York Times. Retrieved 2009-09-08.
  3. ^ "QB raised cowboy tough on Chicken Dinner Road". Calgary Herald. 2008-09-17. Archived from the original on 2012-11-07. Retrieved 2009-09-08.
  4. ^ Maki, Allan (2008-09-17). "Pickett's background overshadows credentials". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2008-09-17.
  5. ^ "Cody Pickett". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 8, 2016.
  6. ^ "Argonauts to start Pickett instead of Joseph against Stamps". TSN.ca. 2008-09-15. Retrieved 2008-09-17.
  7. ^ "Argos' Joseph ready to support starting QB Pickett". TSN.ca. 2008-09-16. Retrieved 2008-09-17.
  8. ^ Girard, Daniel (2009-08-12). "Argos turn to Pickett to spark offence". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2009-08-11.
  9. ^ http://en.montrealalouettes.com/article/walls-seagraves-pickett
  10. ^ The Seattle Times – Cody Pickett looks back after retirement from football – 2011-03-24
  11. ^ "Cody Pickett". pro-football-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved September 8, 2016.
  12. ^ Evancho, Bob (August 28, 1981). "Dee Pickett wasn't roped into the rodeo". Tri-City Herald. p. 22.
  13. ^ Zelkovich, Chris (2009-09-04). "Cowboy turned quarterback ready to ride". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2008-09-17.

External links

2001 Holiday Bowl

The 2001 Culligan Holiday Bowl was a college football bowl game played December 28, 2001, in San Diego, California. It was part of the 2001 NCAA Division I-A football season. It featured the Washington Huskies against the Texas Longhorns. Texas won 47–43 (a combined 90 points despite neither team scoring at all in the 1st quarter) after a dramatic comeback in the 4th quarter, scoring the winning touchdown with 38 seconds left. Earlier, Washington had led by as much as 19 points, and carried a 36-20 lead into the 4th quarter.

2002 Michigan Wolverines football team

The 2002 Michigan Wolverines football team represented the University of Michigan in the 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season. The team's head coach was Lloyd Carr. The Wolverines played their home games at Michigan Stadium. The team was led by All-Americans Bennie Joppru and Marlin Jackson as well as team MVP B. J. Askew.

2002 Sun Bowl

The 2002 Wells Fargo Sun Bowl featured the Purdue Boilermakers, and the Washington Huskies. This game was a rematch of the 2001 Rose Bowl.

Washington scored first when quarterback Cody Pickett threw a 7-yard touchdown strike to wide receiver Patrick Reddick for an early 7-0 lead. 2 minutes later, linebacker Marquis Cooper recovered a fumble and returned it 31 yards for a touchdown doubling the lead to 14-0. a 38-yard John Anderson field goal increased the lead to 17-0, which closed out the 1st quarter scoring.

In the second quarter, quarterback Kyle Orton found wide receiver John Standeford for a 7-yard touchdown pass, to put Purdue on the scoreboard down 17-7. Just before halftime, Washington fumbled the ball, and it was recovered by Ray Williams in the end zone for a touchdown, making the halftime score 17-14.

In the third quarter, Berin Lacevic kicked a 22-yard field goal to tie the game at 17. Running back Joey Harris later scored on a 10-yard touchdown run for Purdue, giving Purdue its first lead at 24-17. On Washington's next possession, they fumbled again, and Gilbert Gardner ran it in 19 yards for a touchdown, and Purdue increased its lead to 31-17.

A 29-yard field goal in the 4th quarter by Purdue made the lead 34-17, and Purdue had scored 17 unanswered points. Washington got on the board one last time after Cody Pickett found Patrick Reddick for a 12-yard touchdown pass to make the final margin 34-24, which was also the final score of the 2001 Rose Bowl just with Washington winning that game.

2002 USC Trojans football team

The 2002 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California in the 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season. USC ended the regular season ranked #5 in both the AP Poll and the Coaches' Poll. Trojans quarterback Carson Palmer won the 2002 Heisman Trophy as the best college football player in America. During the bowl games, USC had a convincing 38–17 win over #3 Iowa in the Orange Bowl. USC became #4 in the final AP Poll and Coaches' Poll. Other notable players for the USC Trojans in 2002 include WR#2 Kareem Kelly, RB#21 Malaefou Mackenzie, QB#10 Matt Cassel, RB#4 Sultan McCullough, RB#34 Hershel Dennis (FR) RB#25 Justin Fargas, RB#39 Sunny Byrd, RB#34 Chad Pierson, WR#44 Gregg Guenther, TE#86 Dominique Byrd, WR#83 Keary Colbert, WR#1 Mike Williams, WR#7 Sandy Fletcher, WR#82 Donald Hale, TE#88 Doyal Butler, and WR#87 Grant Mattos.

The team was named national champion by both Dunkel and Matthews, and co-champion by Sagarin, all NCAA-designated major selectors.

2002 Washington Huskies football team

The 2002 Washington Huskies football team was an American football team that represented the University of Washington during the 2002 NCAA Division I-A football season. In its fourth season under head coach Rick Neuheisel, the team compiled a 7–6 record, finished in a four-way tie for fourth place in the Pacific-10 Conference, and was outscored by its opponents by a combined total of 398 to 342. Cody Pickett and Ben Mahdavi were selected as the team's most valuable player offensive and defensive players, respectively.

2003 Washington Huskies football team

The 2003 Washington Huskies football team was an American football team that represented the University of Washington during the 2003 NCAA Division I-A football season. In its first season under head coach Keith Gilbertson, the team compiled a 6–6 record, finished in a three-way tie for fifth place in the Pacific-10 Conference at 4–4, and was outscored by its opponents by a combined total of 316 to 312.

2008 Toronto Argonauts season

The 2008 Toronto Argonauts season was the 51st season for the team in the Canadian Football League and 136th season overall. The Argonauts attempted to win their 16th Grey Cup, but they failed to make the playoffs ending the season on a nine-game losing streak.

2009 Toronto Argonauts season

The 2009 Toronto Argonauts season was the 52nd season for the team in the Canadian Football League and their 137th overall. The Argonauts attempted to win their 16th Grey Cup championship, but they failed to make the playoffs for the second straight year, finishing the season with a 3–15 record for the first time since 1993.

Training camp opened on June 7 and Toronto's first pre-season game was on June 17, 2009, at the Rogers Centre, hosting the Montreal Alouettes. The regular season kicked off on July 1 at the Hamilton Tiger-Cats' Ivor Wynne Stadium, where the Argos defeated the Ti-Cats 30–17.

Dennis Morrison

Dennis Morrison is a retired professional American football player who played quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers. A left handed quarterback, he played college football at Kansas State.

Greg Zolman

Greg R. Zolman is a former American football quarterback. He was a practice squad member for several NFL teams over a three-year period. He played college football at Vanderbilt.

Jim Powers (American football)

James W. Powers (February 29, 1928 – September 27, 2013) was an American football quarterback, defensive back and linebacker in the National Football League. He played for the San Francisco 49ers. He played college football for the USC Trojans.

Joe Reed (American football)

Joe Reed (born January 8, 1948 in Newport, Rhode Island) is a former professional American football quarterback in the National Football League. He played for the San Francisco 49ers (1972–1974) and the Detroit Lions (1975–1979). He recorded an album of standards with the 49ers' cheerleading squad, then known as the Niner Nuggets, in 1974.

List of San Francisco 49ers starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started at least one game for the San Francisco 49ers of the National Football League. They are listed in order of the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the 49ers.

List of Toronto Argonauts starting quarterbacks

The following is an incomplete list of starting quarterbacks for the Toronto Argonauts of the Canadian Football League that have started a regular season game for the team. This list includes postseason appearances since 1995, but does not include preseason games. They are listed in order of most starts with any tiebreaker being the date of each player's first start at quarterback for the Argonauts.

List of Washington Huskies starting quarterbacks

These quarterbacks have started for the Washington Huskies. They are listed in order of the date of each man's first start at quarterback.

Pickett

Pickett is an English surname. It is a variant form of Pigott. Notable people with the surname include:

Albert J. Pickett (1810–1858), American historian

Allistair Pickett (born 1973), Australian rules footballer

Bill Pickett (c. 1870 – ?), American cowboy and rodeo performer

Bob Pickett (American football) (1932–2010), American footballer

Bobby Pickett (1938–2007), American singer

Brad Pickett (born 1978), British mixed martial arts fighter

Byron Pickett (born 1977), Australian rules footballer

Carroll Pickett (born 1933), American Presbyterian minister

Charles E. Pickett (1866–1930), American politician from Iowa

Cindy Pickett (born 1947), American actress

Cody Pickett (born 1980), Canadian footballer

Cornelius A. Pickett (1902–1990), American politician and Mayor of Houston, Texas (1941-43)

Dan Pickett, (born 1968), American technology entrepreneur, private equity investor and philanthropist

Dan Pickett (musician) (1907–1967), American Piedmont blues and country blues singer, guitarist and songwriter

George Pickett (1825–1875), United States Army officer and Confederate general

Harry Pickett (1862–1907), English cricketer

Hugh Pickett (1913–2006), Canadian impresario

Jay Pickett (born 1961), American actor

Joe Pickett (born 1956), American politician from Texas

John Pickett (disambiguation), several people

Joseph Pickett (painter) (1848–1918), American painter

Justin Pickett, British actor

Keri Pickett (born 1959), American photographer and filmmaker

Lucy Weston Pickett (1904–1997), American chemist and zoologist

Owen B. Pickett (1930–2010), American former politician from Virginia

Michael Pickett, Canadian blues singer

Phil Pickett (born 1948), English composer, musician and record producer

Philip Pickett (born 1950), English musician

Reg Pickett (born 1927), English former professional footballer

Rex Pickett (born 1958), American writer

Ricky Pickett (born 1970), American baseball player

Ritchie Pickett (born 1955), New Zealand singer/songwriter

Ryan Pickett (born 1979), American football player

Shane Pickett (1957–2010), Australian artist

Ted Pickett (1909–2009), Australian sportsman

Tim Pickett (born 1981), American basketball player

Tina Pickett (born 1943), American politician from Pennsylvania

Tom Pickett (outlaw) (1858–1934), American cowboy and professional gambler

Tom Pickett (1906–1980), American politician from Texas

Tony Pickett (born 1953), former Australian rules footballer

Wilson Pickett (1941–2006), American rock and roll singer-songwriter

Scott Bull

John Scott Bull (born June 8, 1953) is a former professional football player, spending three seasons as a quarterback with the San Francisco 49ers. He played college football at the University of Arkansas.

In his NFL career, Bull completed 76 of 193 passes for 3 touchdowns. A strong running quarterback, he rushed for 186 yards in 46 attempts and three touchdowns in his three-year professional career. Bull saw his most extensive action in 1978. He spent 1979 on injured reserve with a knee injury suffered in the final game of the 1978 season.

Tom Owen (American football)

Willis Thomas Owen (born September 1, 1952) is a former American football quarterback who played in ten National Football League (NFL) seasons from 1974–1982 for the San Francisco 49ers, the New England Patriots, the Washington Redskins, and the New York Giants. He played college football at Wichita State University and was drafted in the thirteenth round of the 1974 NFL Draft.

Washington Huskies football statistical leaders

The Washington Huskies football statistical leaders are individual statistical leaders of the Washington Huskies football program in various categories. The Huskies represent the University of Washington in the NCAA's Pac-12 Conference. Washington's first football season was in 1889.

These lists are dominated by more recent players for several reasons:

Since 1920s, seasons have increased to 10 or more games.

The NCAA didn't allow freshmen to play varsity football until 1972 (with the exception of the World War II years), allowing players to have four-year careers.

In 1975, the Pacific-8 Conference removed a restriction which limited the league's bowl game participation to a single representative tied to the Rose Bowl Game

The official NCAA record book does not include bowl games in statistical records until 2002, with most colleges also structure their record books this way.These lists are updated through the end of the 2016 season.

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