Code page 912

Code page 912 (also known as CP 912, IBM 00912) is a code page used under IBM AIX and DOS[1] to write the Albanian, Bosnian, Croatian, Czech, Hungarian, Polish, Romanian, Slovak, Slovene, and Sorbian languages. It is an extension of ISO/IEC 8859-2.

Code page layout

In the following table characters are shown together with their corresponding Unicode code points. Only the second half is shown, code points 0-127 are the same as code page 437.

Code Page 912
_0 _1 _2 _3 _4 _5 _6 _7 _8 _9 _A _B _C _D _E _F
8_

2591

2592

2593

2502

2524

2518

250C

2588
©
00A9

2563

2551

2557

255D
¢
00A2
¥
00A5

2510
9_

2514

2534

252C

251C

2500

253C

2584

2580

255A

2554

2569

2566

2560

2550

256C
®
00AE
A_
160
NBSP
00A0
Ą
0104
˘
02D8
Ł
0141
¤
00A4
Ľ
013D
Ś
015A
§
00A7
¨
00A8
Š
0160
Ş
015E
Ť
0164
Ź
0179
SHY
00AD
Ž
017D
Ż
017B
B_
176
°
00B0
ą
0105
˛
02DB
ł
0142
´
00B4
ľ
013E
ś
015B
ˇ
02C7
¸
00B8
š
0161
ş
015F
ť
0165
ź
017A
˝
02DD
ž
017E
ż
017C
C_
192
Ŕ
0154
Á
00C1
Â
00C2
Ă
0102
Ä
00C4
Ĺ
0139
Ć
0106
Ç
00C7
Č
010C
É
00C9
Ę
0118
Ë
00CB
Ě
011A
Í
00CD
Î
00CE
Ď
010E
D_
208
Đ
0110
Ń
0143
Ň
0147
Ó
00D3
Ô
00D4
Ő
0150
Ö
00D6
×
00D7
Ř
0158
Ů
016E
Ú
00DA
Ű
0170
Ü
00DC
Ý
00DD
Ţ
0162
ß
00DF
E_
224
ŕ
0155
á
00E1
â
00E2
ă
0103
ä
00E4
ĺ
013A
ć
0107
ç
00E7
č
010D
é
00E9
ę
0119
ë
00EB
ě
011B
í
00ED
î
00EE
ď
010F
F_
240
đ
0111
ń
0144
ň
0148
ó
00F3
ô
00F4
ő
0151
ö
00F6
÷
00F7
ř
0159
ů
016F
ú
00FA
ű
0171
ü
00FC
ý
00FD
ţ
0163
˙
02D9

References

  1. ^ Paul, Matthias (2001-06-10) [1995]. "DOS COUNTRY.SYS file format" (COUNTRY.LST file) (1.44 ed.). Archived from the original on 2016-04-20. Retrieved 2016-08-20.
Code page

In computing, a code page is a character encoding and as such it is a specific association of a set of printable characters and control characters with unique numbers.

The term "code page" originated from IBM's EBCDIC-based mainframe systems, but Microsoft, SAP, and Oracle Corporation are among the few vendors which use this term. The majority of vendors identify their own character sets by a name. In the case when there is a plethora of character sets (like in IBM), identifying character sets through a number is a convenient way to distinguish them. Originally, the code page numbers referred to the page numbers in the IBM standard character set manual, a condition which has not held for a long time. Vendors that use a code page system allocate their own code page number to a character encoding, even if it is better known by another name; for example, UTF-8 has been assigned page numbers 1208 at IBM, 65001 at Microsoft, and 4110 at SAP.

Hewlett-Packard uses a similar concept in its HP-UX operating system and its Printer Command Language (PCL) protocol for printers (either for HP printers or not). The terminology, however, is different: What others call a character set, HP calls a symbol set, and what IBM or Microsoft call a code page, HP calls a symbol set code. HP developed a series of symbol sets, each with an associated symbol set code, to encode both its own character sets and other vendors’ character sets.

The multitude of character sets leads many vendors to recommend Unicode.

ISO/IEC 8859-2

ISO/IEC 8859-2:1999, Information technology — 8-bit single-byte coded graphic character sets — Part 2: Latin alphabet No. 2, is part of the ISO/IEC 8859 series of ASCII-based standard character encodings, first edition published in 1987. It is informally referred to as "Latin-2". It is generally intended for Central or "Eastern European" languages that are written in the Latin script. Note that ISO/IEC 8859-2 is very different from code page 852 (MS-DOS Latin 2, PC Latin 2) which is also referred to as "Latin-2" in Czech and Slovak regions. Code page 912 is an extension.

ISO-8859-2 is the IANA preferred charset name for this standard when supplemented with the C0 and C1 control codes from ISO/IEC 6429. 0.1% of all web pages use ISO 8859-2 in December 2018. Microsoft has assigned code page 28592 a.k.a. Windows-28592 to ISO-8859-2 in Windows. IBM assigned Code page 1111 to ISO 8859-2.

Windows-1250 is similar to ISO-8859-2 and has all the printable characters it has and more. However a few of them are rearranged (unlike Windows-1252, which keeps all printable characters from ISO-8859-1 in the same place).

These code values can be used for the following languages:

Albanian

Bosnian

Croatian

Czech

German (fully compatible with ISO/IEC 8859-1 for German texts)

Hungarian

Polish

Serbian Latin

Slovak

Slovene

Upper Sorbian

Lower Sorbian

Turkmen.It can also be used for Romanian, but it is not well suited for that language, due to lacking letters s and t with commas below, although it provides s and t with similar-looking cedillas. These letters were unified in the first versions of the Unicode standard, meaning that the appearance with cedilla or with a comma was treated as a glyph choice rather than as separate characters; fonts intended for use with Romanian should therefore, in theory, have characters with a comma below at those code points.

Microsoft did not really provide such fonts for computers sold in Romania. Still, ISO/IEC 8859-2 and Windows-1250 (with the same problem) have been heavily used for Romanian. Unicode subsequently disunified the comma variants from the cedilla variants, and has since taken the lead for web pages, which however often have s and t with cedilla anyway. Unicode notes as of 2014 that disunifying the letters with comma below was a mistake, causing corruptions of Romanian data: pre-existing data and input methods would still contain the older cedilla codepoints, complicating text searching.

Early telecommunications
ISO/IEC 8859
Bibliographic use
National standards
EUC
ISO/IEC 2022
MacOS code pages("scripts")
DOS code pages
IBM AIX code pages
IBM Apple MacIntoshemulations
IBM Adobe emulations
IBM DEC emulations
IBM HP emulations
Windows code pages
EBCDIC code pages
Platform specific
Unicode / ISO/IEC 10646
TeX typesetting system
Miscellaneous code pages
Related topics

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