Cochituate, Massachusetts

Cochituate (/koʊˈtʃɪtʃuɪt/; koh-CHIT-choo-it) is a census-designated place (CDP) in the town of Wayland in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 6,569 at the 2010 census.[1]

Cochituate, Massachusetts
Cochituate School
Cochituate School
Coordinates: 42°19′40″N 71°21′37″W / 42.32778°N 71.36028°WCoordinates: 42°19′40″N 71°21′37″W / 42.32778°N 71.36028°W
CountryUnited States
StateMassachusetts
CountyMiddlesex
TownWayland
Area
 • Total4.2 sq mi (10.8 km2)
 • Land3.8 sq mi (9.9 km2)
 • Water0.3 sq mi (0.8 km2)
Elevation
174 ft (53 m)
Population
 (2010)
 • Total6,569
 • Density1,600/sq mi (610/km2)
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
01778
Area code(s)508
FIPS code25-14570
GNIS feature ID0611909

Geography

Cochituate is located at 42°19′40″N 71°21′37″W / 42.32778°N 71.36028°W.[2]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 10.8 km² (4.2 mi²). 9.9 km² (3.8 mi²) of it is land and 0.8 km² (0.3 mi²) of it (7.69%) is water.

It is home to Lake Cochituate and Dudley Pond. Both are used by residents year round; in the summer for boating and fishing, and in the winter for ice fishing.[3] Lake Cochituate, which consists of four ponds connected by shallow, narrow waterways, is located in the towns of Natick, Framingham, and Wayland, Mass., 16 miles west of Boston. Lake Cochituate lies in the Sudbury River Basin; cochituate means “swift river” in the Algonquin language (Wilbur, 1978) and refers to Cochituate Brook (Schaller and Prescott, 1998), which connects the lake to the Sudbury River.[4]

Demographics

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 6,768 people, 2,449 households, and 1,851 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 682.3/km² (1,765.6/mi²). There were 2,516 housing units at an average density of 253.6/km² (656.4/mi²). The racial makeup of the CDP was 90.90% White, 0.93% Black or African American, 0.09% Native American, 6.24% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.24% from other races, and 1.55% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.00% of the population.

There were 2,449 households out of which 38.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.9% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.4% were non-families. 19.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the CDP, the population was spread out with 27.2% under the age of 18, 3.5% from 18 to 24, 25.5% from 25 to 44, 27.8% from 45 to 64, and 16.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.8 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $89,012, and the median income for a family was $101,362. Males had a median income of $71,500 versus $50,223 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $42,752. About 1.8% of families and 2.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.1% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over. There used to be a Cochituate baseball league where people of many ages could participate in relaxing games after long days of work in the newly arising industrial community

References

  1. ^ "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Cochituate CDP, Massachusetts". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved April 9, 2012.
  2. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  3. ^ "Recreation". Dudley Pond Association. Retrieved 2011-05-23.
  4. ^ Paul J. Friesz and Peter E. Church. "Pond-Aquifer Interaction at South Pond of Lake Cochituate, Natick, Massachusetts" (PDF). Retrieved 2013-03-05.
  5. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
Dudley Pond, Cochituate Massachusetts

Dudley Pond is an 84 acre Great Pond in the Cochituate census-designated area of Wayland, Massachusetts. The Pond is a shallow glacial landform fed primarily by rain.Dudley Pond was used in the mid-1800s as a stand-by water source for Boston. At the time it was connected by pipe to the nearby and much larger Lake Cochituate. In the 1920s and 30s the Pond became center for nightlife and Prohibition-breaking, with a concomitant decline in habitat and sanitation. Efforts to restore the environment beginning in the mid-century returned the Pond to a high standard of water quality.

More recently Dudley Pond has been primarily a vacation spot, residential area, and community recreation site. Notable residents of the Pond area include the late Ted Williams and current resident George Howell. The Pond currently has one eatery, The Dudley Chateau. Recreation activities include public fishing and boating.

The Pond is owned by the Town of Wayland, on a long-term lease. Since 1968 its health and habitat have been monitored by the Dudley Pond Association, a non-profit corporation.

Ulysses J. Lupien

For his son, the Major League Baseball player, see Tony LupienUlysses John Lupien Sr. (December 1883 - August 15, 1965) was an American businessman and government official who served as Massachusetts director of civil service and city manager of Lowell, Massachusetts.

Warren L. Bishop

Warren L. Bishop (1890–1939) was an American lawyer and politician who served as District Attorney of Middlesex County, Massachusetts from 1931 to 1939.

Wayland, Massachusetts

Wayland is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 13,444 at the 2010 census. Wayland is part of the fifth congressional district of Massachusetts.

For geographic and demographic information on Cochituate, which is part of Wayland, please see the article Cochituate, Massachusetts.

Municipalities and communities of Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States
Cities
Towns
CDPs
Other
villages

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.