Cluj-Napoca metropolitan area

The Cluj-Napoca metropolitan area is a metropolitan area founded in December 2008.[2] It has a population of 411,379[1][3] of which 324,576 are living in Cluj-Napoca and 86,803 in 17 communes: Aiton, Apahida, Baciu, Bonţida, Borşa, Căianu, Chinteni, Ciurila, Cojocna, Feleacu, Floreşti, Gârbău, Gilău, Jucu, Petreștii de Jos, Tureni, Vultureni.

As defined by Eurostat, with 379,733 residents (as of 2015), the Cluj-Napoca functional urban area is the fifth most populous in Romania.[4]

Cluj-Napoca metropolitan area
Metropolitan area
Cluj-Napoca Metropolitan Area jud Cluj
Coordinates: 46°46′N 23°35′E / 46.767°N 23.583°ECoordinates: 46°46′N 23°35′E / 46.767°N 23.583°E
Country Romania
County Cluj County
Central MunicipalityCluj-Napoca
Other localitiesAiton, Apahida, Baciu, Bonţida, Borşa, Căianu, Chinteni, Ciurila, Cojocna, Feleacu, Floreşti, Gârbău, Gilău, Jucu, Săvădisla, Tureni, Vultureni
Functional2008
Area
 • Total1,537.54 km2 (593.65 sq mi)
Population
(2011 census[1])
 • Total411,379
 • Density268/km2 (690/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+2 (EET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+3 (EEST)
Postal Code
40wxyz1
Area code(s)+40 x642
Websitehttp://www.cjcluj.ro/zona-metropolitana-urbana/
1w, x, y, and z are digits that indicate the street, part of the street, or even the building of the address
2x is a digit indicating the operator: 2 for the former national operator, Romtelecom, and 3 for the other ground telephone networks

References

  1. ^ a b "Rezultate definitive ale Recensământului Populaţiei şi Locuinţelor – 2011". Cluj County Regional Statistics Directorate. 2013-07-05. Retrieved 2013-07-05.
  2. ^ (in Romanian) "Asociaţia Metropolitană e “la cheie”. Mai trebuie banii", Ziua de Cluj, 9 January 2009
  3. ^ "Zona Metropolitana Urbana" (in Romanian). CJ Cluj. Retrieved May 25, 2009.
  4. ^ "Population on 1 January by age groups and sex - functional urban areas". Eurostat. Retrieved 29 October 2017.
Cluj-Napoca

Cluj-Napoca (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈkluʒ naˈpoka] (listen), German: Klausenburg; Hungarian: Kolozsvár, Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈkoloʒvaːr] (listen); Medieval Latin: Castrum Clus, Claudiopolis; and Yiddish: קלויזנבורג‎, Kloiznburg), commonly known as Cluj, is the fourth most populous city in Romania, and the seat of Cluj County in the northwestern part of the country. Geographically, it is roughly equidistant from Bucharest (324 kilometres (201 miles)), Budapest (351 km (218 mi)) and Belgrade (322 km (200 mi)). Located in the Someșul Mic River valley, the city is considered the unofficial capital to the historical province of Transylvania. From 1790 to 1848 and from 1861 to 1867, it was the official capital of the Grand Principality of Transylvania.

As of 2011, 324,576 inhabitants lived within the city limits (making it the country's second most populous at the time, after the national capital Bucharest), marking a slight increase from the figure recorded at the 2002 census. The Cluj-Napoca metropolitan area has a population of 411,379 people, while the population of the peri-urban area (Romanian: zona periurbană) exceeds 420,000 residents. The new metropolitan government of Cluj-Napoca became operational in December 2008. According to a 2007 estimate provided by the County Population Register Service, the city hosts a visible population of students and other non-residents—an average of over 20,000 people each year during 2004–2007. The city spreads out from St. Michael's Church in Unirii Square, built in the 14th century and named after the Archangel Michael, the patron saint of Cluj-Napoca. The boundaries of the municipality contain an area of 179.52 square kilometres (69.31 sq mi).

Cluj-Napoca experienced a decade of decline during the 1990s, its international reputation suffering from the policies of its mayor at the time, Gheorghe Funar. Today, the city is one of the most important academic, cultural, industrial and business centres in Romania. Among other institutions, it hosts the country's largest university, Babeș-Bolyai University, with its botanical garden; nationally renowned cultural institutions; as well as the largest Romanian-owned commercial bank. Cluj-Napoca held the titles of European Youth Capital in 2015 and European City of Sport in 2018.

Florești, Cluj

Florești (Hungarian: Szászfenes; German: Deutsch Branndorf) is a commune in Cluj County, Romania. It is composed of three villages: Florești, Luna de Sus (Magyarlóna) and Tăuți (Kolozstótfalu) and is part of the Cluj-Napoca metropolitan area, being located less than 8 km west of Cluj-Napoca on DN1.

Benefiting from its proximity to Cluj-Napoca, the commune has seen a substantial development since the early 2000s, including a threefold increase in population, mainly due to several new residential developments. It was the most populous commune in Romania recorded at the 2011 census.

Metropolitan areas in Romania

There are 10 metropolitan areas in Romania that have been constituted as of 2013.

Timeline of Cluj-Napoca

The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

The following detailed sequence of events covers the timeline of Cluj-Napoca, a city in Transylvania, Romania.

Cluj-Napoca (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈkluʒ naˈpoka] (listen), German: Klausenburg; Hungarian: Kolozsvár, Hungarian pronunciation: [ˈkoloʒvaːr] (listen); Medieval Latin: Castrum Clus, Claudiopolis; and Yiddish: קלויזנבורג‎, Kloiznburg), commonly known as Cluj, is located in the Someșul Mic River valley, roughly equidistant from Bucharest (324 kilometres (201 miles)), Budapest (351 km (218 mi)) and Belgrade (322 km (200 mi)). Throughout its long history, the area around Cluj-Napoca was part of many empires and kingdoms, including the Roman Empire (as part of the Dacia province and later a sub-division of Dacia Porolissensis), Gepidia, Avaria, the Hungarian Kingdom, the Habsburg Monarchy, Austria-Hungary and the Kingdom of Romania. From 1790–1848 and 1861–1867, it was the official capital of the Grand Principality of Transylvania.

In modern times, the city holds the status of municipiu, is the seat of Cluj County in the north-western part of Romania, and continues to be considered the unofficial capital of the historical province of Transylvania. Cluj continues to be one of the most important academic, cultural, industrial and business centres in Romania. Among other institutions, it hosts the country's largest university, Babeș-Bolyai University, with its famous botanical garden. The current boundaries of the municipality contain an area of 179.52 square kilometres (69.31 sq mi). The Cluj-Napoca metropolitan area has a population of 411,379 people, while the population of the peri-urban area (Romanian: zona periurbană) exceeds 420,000 residents, making it one of the most populous cities in Romania.

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