Clint Frank

Clinton E. Frank (September 13, 1915 – July 7, 1992) was an American football player and advertising executive. He played halfback for Yale University. In 1954, he founded the Clinton E. Frank, Inc. advertising agency.

Clint Frank
Clint Frank
Yale Bulldogs – No. 14
PositionHalfback
ClassGraduate
Career history
College
High schoolEvanston (IL)
Personal information
Born:September 13, 1915
St. Louis, Missouri
Died:July 7, 1992 (aged 76)
Evanston, Illinois
Height5 ft 10 in (1.78 m)
Weight190 lb (86 kg)
Career highlights and awards
College Football Hall of Fame (1955)

Early life and football career

Frank attended Evanston Township High School in Evanston, Illinois, where he obtained notoriety as a superb football player. He then attended Lawrenceville School as a post-graduate student.

Frank attended Yale College, where he was a member of Skull and Bones,[1] and graduated with a degree in economics in 1938. In football, he was a two-time team captain and All-American, and as a senior in 1937, he won the Heisman Trophy and the Maxwell Award.[2] He beat out Byron "Whizzer" White for the Heisman Trophy; White later became a justice of the U.S. Supreme Court. Frank also received the Maxwell Award after his senior year in which he scored three touchdowns in his team`s 19–0 victory over Brown.[3]

Frank was married to Margaret Rathje Frank, with whom he had three sons and six daughters.[3]

Military service

Clint Frank attained the rank of lieutenant colonel in the Army Air Corps, serving as an aide to General Jimmy Doolittle during World War II. Following the war he resumed his career in advertising.

Advertising career

Frank joined the Chicago advertising firm of Blackett-Sample-Hummert Inc., where he was employed for ten years before being promoted to advertising manager of E.J. Brach and Sons, the famed candy producer. Frank became a full partner in the advertising agency of Price, Robinson and Frank. He was able to transition this agency into his own with him as owner and president. In 1954 Frank established Clinton E. Frank Inc., a Chicago based advertising agency which was sold to Campbell-Ewald Co. of Detroit in 1976.[4]

Braniff Airways account

One of Clinton E. Frank Agency's most memorable clients was the flashy Dallas-based Braniff International Airways. Frank obtained the account in 1969 from famed advertising executive George Lois. The Frank Agency created the "El Clan, Braniff" advertising scheme for Braniff's growing South American Route System. They also created the highly unique Braniff "You'll Like Flying Braniff Style" Campaign. Both campaigns came complete with musical jingles which were debuted in 1971.[5]

Board memberships

  • Baxter Travenol Laboratories, Inc., Board Member
  • Passavant Hospital, Director
  • Northwestern University Hospital, Director
  • Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Governing Member
  • Yale Club of Chicago, Member
  • American Association of Advertising, President
  • Chicago Advertising Club, President
  • Illinois Racing Board, Board Member

Honors

  • Heisman Trophy, 1937
  • Maxwell Award, 1937
  • All American Quarterback and captain, two time recipient, 1937
  • Good Shepard Award from the Lambs, A country home that aids mentally retarded children (three time award recipient)

Retirement and death

Frank founded the Brain Research Foundation at the University of Chicago and the Eye Research Institute in Boston. He also founded the American Academy of Arts during his retirement.

Frank died at Evanston Hospital in Evanston, Illinois after a brief illness.[3]

References

  1. ^ Wallace, William N. (2005). Yale's Ironmen: A Story of Football & Lives in the Decade of the Depresion & Beyond. p. 157.
  2. ^ http://www.star-telegram.com/2010/10/18/2550328_put-your-knowledge-of-athletes.html
  3. ^ a b c Nidetz, Steve (July 8, 1992). "Clinton Frank, Ad Exec, Football Star". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 26 July 2013.
  4. ^ Clinton Frank Obituary in The New York Times
  5. ^ "Jingle: Braniff "You'll Like Flying Braniff Style"". Fly The Branded Skies. www.brandedskies.com. Retrieved 25 July 2013.

External links

1936 College Football All-America Team

The 1936 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1936. The nine selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1936 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the United Press (UP), (4) the All-America Board (AAB), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA), and (9) the Sporting News (SN).

1937 College Football All-America Team

The 1937 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1937. The ten selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1937 season are (1) Collier's Weekly, as selected by Grantland Rice, (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the United Press (UP), (4) the All-America Board (AAB), (5) the International News Service (INS), (6) Liberty magazine, (7) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (8) Newsweek, (9) the North American Newspaper Alliance (NANA), and (10) the Sporting News (SN).

1937 college football season

The 1937 college football season ended with the Panthers of the University of Pittsburgh being named the nation’s #1 team (and "mythical national champion") by 30 of the 33 voters in the Associated Press writers' poll. The AP poll was in its second year, and seven votes were taken during the final weeks of the 1937 season, starting with October 18. Each writer listed his choice for the top ten teams, and points were tallied based on 10 for first place, 9 for second, etc., and the AP then ranked the twenty teams with the highest number of points. With 33 writers polled, Pitt received 30 first place votes and 3 second-place, for a total of 327 points.

The NCAA began keeping official game statistics in 1937.

1938 NFL Draft

The 1938 National Football League Draft was held on December 12, 1937, at the Hotel Sherman in Chicago, Illinois. The draft consisted of 12 rounds and 110 player selections. It began with the Cleveland Rams, taking Corbett Davis.

Byron White

Byron Raymond "Whizzer" White (June 8, 1917 – April 15, 2002) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from April 12, 1962 to June 28, 1993.Born and raised in Colorado, he played college football, basketball, and baseball for the University of Colorado, finishing as the runner up for the Heisman Trophy in 1937. He was selected in the first round of the 1938 NFL Draft by the Pittsburgh Pirates and led the National Football League in rushing yards in his rookie season. White was admitted to Yale Law School in 1939 and played for the Detroit Lions in the 1940 and 1941 seasons. During World War II, he served as an intelligence officer with the United States Navy in the Pacific. After the war, he graduated from Yale and clerked for Chief Justice Fred M. Vinson.

White entered private practice in Denver, Colorado, working primarily as a transactional attorney. He served as the Colorado state chair of John F. Kennedy's 1960 presidential campaign and accepted appointment as the United States Deputy Attorney General in 1961. In 1962, President Kennedy successfully nominated White to the Supreme Court, making White the first Supreme Court Justice from Colorado. He retired in 1993 and was succeeded by Ruth Bader Ginsburg. White is the twelfth longest-serving justice in Supreme Court history.

White viewed his own court decisions as based on the facts of each case rather than as representative of a specific legal philosophy. He wrote the majority opinion in cases including Coker v. Georgia, Washington v. Davis and Bowers v. Hardwick. He wrote dissenting opinions in notable cases such as Miranda v. Arizona, Immigration and Naturalization Service v. Chadha, and Roe v. Wade.

Ducky Pond

Raymond W. "Ducky" Pond (February 17, 1902 – August 25, 1982) was an American football and baseball player and football coach. He was the head football coach at Yale University from 1934 to 1940, and at Bates College in 1941 and from 1946 to 1951, compiling career college football record of 52–55–3. Pond's record at Yale was 30–25–2 record, including a 4–3 mark versus Harvard. He mentored two of the first three winners of the Heisman Trophy, Larry Kelley and Clint Frank. At Bates, Pond led the undefeated and untied 1946 Bobcats squad to the inaugural Glass Bowl.Pond was a public relations executive after his career in athletics.

Harvard–Yale football rivalry

The Harvard–Yale football rivalry is renewed annually with The Game, an American college football contest between the Harvard Crimson football team of Harvard University and the Yale Bulldogs football team of Yale University. The contest concludes the season for both programs, the winner does not take possession of a physical prize, and the respective Yale residential college football teams compete against "sister" Harvard house teams the day before. The Game is third among most-played NCAA Division I football rivalries. Yale leads the series 67–60–8.

"Harvard and Yale generally duke it out in the academic arena", but geographic proximity, the history of Yale's founding and social competition between the respective student and alumni bodies animate the athletic rivalry. Competition for undergraduate matriculants helps sustain the rivalry.

Harvard football head coach Joe Restic, who held position for 23 seasons, quipped regarding his relationship with retired Yale football head coach and National Football Foundation/College Football Hall of Fame member Carm Cozza, who held position for 32 seasons: "Each year, we're friends for 364 days and rivals for one." The athletic rivalry is historically the second in American intercollegiate athletics, with Rutgers vs Princeton being the first, having played the first ever college football game.The signature Harvard fight song, "Ten Thousand Men of Harvard", names Yale in the famous final stanza. The song is sung in the Harvard football locker room after a victory regardless of the opponent. The song is among six Harvard fight songs that mention Yale. "Down the Field" is Yale's signature fight song and Harvard is the named foe. The song is among five that mention Harvard. Two of the songs, "Bingo, That's the Lingo" and "Goodnight, Harvard", have been sung substituting Princeton for Harvard when appropriate. Cole Porter composed the former and Douglas Moore the latter.The football rivalry is among the most admired rivalries on the American athletic scene. The schools and the rivalry established the template for American college football. The Game is the most prominent athletic contest between the schools and has accounted for many of either rival's best-publicized athletic feats. Sports Illustrated (College Edition) rated the athletic rivalry sixth-best among American athletic collegiate rivalries behind, in order, Alabama–Auburn, Duke–North Carolina, UCLA–USC, Army–Navy and Cal–Stanford. The football rivalry was ranked eighth among Athlon Sports top 25 rivalries in the history of college football.

Heisman Trophy

The Heisman Memorial Trophy (usually known colloquially as the Heisman Trophy or The Heisman), is awarded annually to a player in NCAA football. Winners epitomize great ability combined with diligence, perseverance, and hard work. It is presented by the Heisman Trophy Trust in early December before the postseason bowl games.

The award was created by the Downtown Athletic Club in 1935 to recognize "the most valuable college football player east of the Mississippi," and was first awarded to University of Chicago halfback Jay Berwanger. After the death in October 1936 of the Club's athletic director, John Heisman, the award was named in his honor and broadened to include players west of the Mississippi. Heisman had been active in college athletics as a football player; a head football, basketball, and baseball coach; and an athletic director. It is the oldest of several overall awards in college football, including the Maxwell Award, Walter Camp Award, and the AP Player of the Year. The Heisman and the AP Player of the Year honor the most outstanding player, while the Maxwell and the Walter Camp award recognizes the best player, and the Archie Griffin Award recognizes the most valuable player. The most recent winner of the Heisman Trophy is University of Oklahoma quarterback Kyler Murray.

John Hersey

John Richard Hersey (June 17, 1914 – March 24, 1993) was an American writer and journalist. He is considered one of the earliest practitioners of the so-called New Journalism, in which storytelling techniques of fiction are adapted to non-fiction reportage. Hersey's account of the aftermath of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, was adjudged the finest piece of American journalism of the 20th century by a 36-member panel associated with New York University's journalism department.

List of Harvard–Yale football games

The football teams of Harvard and Yale have been meeting nearly annually since their first game on November 13, 1875. For an overview of these matches, see The Game.

Following is a table of dates, scores and venues of Harvard-Yale games. All games were played on Saturdays except those in 1883 and 1887 when the game was played on Thursday, Thanksgiving Day. Since 1945 the Game has been played in New Haven, Connecticut in odd years and in the Allston neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts in even years.

As of November 2018, 135 games have been played. Yale has 67 wins and Harvard has 60 wins (8 games ended as ties). Harvard has the longest winning streak (nine games).

List of Heisman Trophy winners

The Heisman Trophy, one of the highest individual awards in American college football, has been awarded 81 times since its creation in 1935, including 79 unique winners and one two-time winner. The trophy is given annually to the most outstanding college football player in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), and is awarded by the Heisman Trust, successors of the awards from the Downtown Athletic Club at an annual ceremony at the PlayStation Theater in Times Square, Manhattan.

In 1935, the award, then known as the DAC Trophy, was created by New York City's Downtown Athletic Club to recognize the best college football player "east of the Mississippi River". In that inaugural year, the award went to Jay Berwanger from the University of Chicago. Berwanger was later drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles of the National Football League but declined to sign for them. He never played professional football for any team, instead choosing to pursue a career in business. In 1936, the club's athletic director, football pioneer John Heisman, died and the trophy was renamed in his honor. Larry Kelley, the second winner of the award, was the first to win it as the "Heisman Trophy". In addition to the name change, the award also became a nationwide achievement. With the new name, players west of the Mississippi became eligible; the first player from the western United States was selected in 1938. Only one player, Ohio State's Archie Griffin, has won the award twice.On June 10, 2010, following several years of investigation, the NCAA announced that USC running back Reggie Bush, the 2005 Heisman trophy winner, received gifts from agents while still in college. The university received major sanctions, and there were reports that the Heisman Trophy Trust would strip his award. In September of that year, Bush voluntarily forfeited his title as the 2005 winner. The Heisman Trust decided to leave the award vacated with no new winner to be announced.Between 1936 and 2001, the award was given at an annual gala ceremony at the Downtown Athletic Club in New York City. The Downtown Athletic Club's facilities were damaged during the September 11, 2001 attacks. Due to financial difficulties stemming from the damage, the DAC declared bankruptcy in 2002, turning over its building to creditors. Following the club's bankruptcy and the loss of the original Downtown Athletic Club building, the Yale Club of New York City assumed presenting honors in 2002 and 2003. The ceremony was moved to the New York Marriott Marquis in Times Square for the 2002, 2003, and 2004 presentations, but since 2005, the event has been held at the venue now known as PlayStation Theater, also in Times Square. The move to the PlayStation Theater allowed the Downtown Athletic Club (and ultimately, the award's successor, The Heisman Trust) to resume full control of the event—the most prominent example of which was the return of the official portraits of past winners—despite the loss of the original presentation hall.In terms of balloting, the fifty states of the U.S. are split into six regions (Far West, Mid Atlantic, Mid West, North East, South, South West), and six regional representatives are selected to appoint voters in their states. Each region has 145 media votes, for a total of 870 votes. In addition, all previous Heisman winners may vote, and one final vote is counted through public balloting. The Heisman ballots contain a 3-2-1 point system, in which each ballot ranks the voter's top three players and awards them three points for a first-place daddy vote, two points for a second-place vote, and one point for a third-place vote. The points are tabulated, and the player with the highest total of points across all ballots wins the Heisman Trophy.

List of Yale Bulldogs in the NFL Draft

This is a list of Yale Bulldogs football players in the NFL Draft.

List of unanimous All-Americans in college football

The College Football All-America Team is an honorific college football all-star team compiled after each NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) season to recognize that season's most outstanding performers at their respective positions. There are several organizations that select their own All-America teams. Since 1924, the NCAA has designated selectors whose teams are used to determine "consensus" and "unanimous" All-Americans. Any player who is named to the first team by at least half the official selectors for a given season is recognized as being a consensus All-American. A player on the first team of every official selector is recognized as being a unanimous All-American. Since 2002, the five selectors designated by the NCAA for this purpose are the Associated Press (AP), the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), Sporting News, and the Walter Camp Football Foundation (WCFF).Unanimous All-Americans are considered "elite, the cream of the crop from any particular season." Many are later inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame, and many also go on to have successful professional football careers. From 1924 to 2000, 364 players were unanimous selections at least once. Thus, only a handful of players—if any—each season receive the honor. The first player to do so was Red Grange, star halfback for the Illinois Fighting Illini, who received first-team honors from all six major selectors in 1924.As of the end of 2018 Division I FBS season, Oklahoma has had the most unanimous All-America selections of any school, with 35, followed by Alabama and Notre Dame with 34 each. Eighty-four schools have had at least one unanimous All-America selection. The most recent All-America team, the 2018 team, consisted of eight unanimous selections.

Maxwell Award

The Maxwell Award is presented annually to the college football player judged by a panel of sportscasters, sportswriters, and National Collegiate Athletic Association head coaches and the membership of the Maxwell Football Club to be the best all-around in the United States. The award is named after Robert "Tiny" Maxwell, a Swarthmore College football player, coach and sportswriter. Johnny Lattner (1952, 1953) and Tim Tebow (2007, 2008) are the only players to have won the award twice. It is the college equivalent of the Bert Bell Award of the National Football League, also given out by the Maxwell Club.

Princeton–Yale football rivalry

The Princeton–Yale football rivalry is an American college football rivalry between the Princeton Tigers of Princeton University and the Yale Bulldogs of Yale University. The football rivalry is among the oldest in American sports.

The Persuader (film)

The Persuader is a 1957 American Western film directed by Dick Ross and written by Curtis Kenyon. The film stars William Talman, James Craig, Kristine Miller, Darryl Hickman, Georgia Lee and Alvy Moore. The film was released on October 13, 1957, by Allied Artists Pictures.

Yale Bulldogs football

The Yale Bulldogs football program represents Yale University in college football at the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA). Yale's football program is one of the oldest in the world (i.e. North America), having begun competing in the sport in 1872. The Bulldogs have a legacy that includes 27 national championships, two of the first three Heisman Trophy winners (Larry Kelley in 1936 and Clint Frank in 1937), 100 consensus All-Americans, 28 College Football Hall of Fame inductees, including the "Father of American Football" Walter Camp, the first professional football player Pudge Heffelfinger, and coaching giants Amos Alonzo Stagg, Howard Jones, Tad Jones and Carmen Cozza. With 890 wins, Yale ranks second in wins in college football history, trailing only the University of Michigan.

Yale Club of New York City

The Yale Club of New York City, commonly called The Yale Club, is a private club in Midtown Manhattan, in New York City, New York, United States. Its membership is restricted almost entirely to alumni and faculty of Yale University. With a clubhouse comprising 22 stories The Yale Club has a worldwide membership of over 11,000. Upon opening its doors in 1915, the building became the largest Clubhouse in the world and continues to be the largest college clubhouse in existence today.

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