Cliff Gustafson

Cliff Gustafson is a former Texas high school & college baseball coach who was, for twenty-nine seasons, the head coach of The University of Texas at Austin Longhorn baseball team.

Cliff Gustafson
Biographical details
BornFebruary 12, 1931 (age 88)
Kenedy, Texas
Playing career
1952University of Texas
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1953-1967South San Antonio High School
1968-1996University of Texas
Head coaching record
Overall1,466-377-2 (college)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Awards
College Baseball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2006

Early life

Gustafson, born February 12, 1931, is a native of Kenedy, Texas. He played baseball at UT, including the 1952 team that won the Southwest Conference championship and reached the College World Series. Gustafson posted a .308 batting average for his collegiate career and went on to play professional baseball.

Coaching career

South San Antonio High School

After briefly playing baseball professionally, Gustafson coached at South San Antonio High School from 1953 to 1967. During his 14 season, Gustafson led the Bobcats baseball to Texas Class 3A State Championships(6x) in 1958, 1959, 1961, 1963, 1964, 1967.[1]

The University of Texas

In 1968, after hanging up initially on University of Texas football coach & athletic director, Darrell Royal (Gustafson thought it was a prank phone call) Gustafson took a pay cut to coach the baseball team at The University of Texas at Austin. While there, he led the Longhorns to twenty-two Southwest Conference Championships, a record seventeen College World Series appearances, and two national championships in baseball 1975 and 1983.[2]

Many of Gustafson's players went on to play Major League Baseball. Among that group are Jim Acker, Billy Bates, Mike Brumley, Mike Capel, Roger Clemens, Dennis Cook, Scott Coolbaugh, Keith Creel, Kirk Dressendorfer, Ron Gardenhire, Jim Gideon, Jerry Don Gleaton, Burt Hooton, Bob Kearney, Brooks Kieschnick, Keith Moreland, Calvin Murray, Spike Owen, Karl Pagel, Mark Petkovsek, Shane Reynolds, Andre Robertson, Bruce Ruffin, Calvin Schiraldi, J.D. Smart, Greg Swindell, Jose Tolentino, Richard Wortham, and Ricky Wright. Coach Gustafson has been inducted into the University of Texas Hall of Honor(1983)[3], American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame(1992)[4] and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame(1994)[5]. He was named National Coach of the Year in baseball in 1982 and 1983 and awarded 1998 James Keller Sportsmanship Award.[6]. He was also named an inaugural member of National Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006.[7]

After coaching

Gustafson resides at his home is Austin, Texas. He enjoys spending time with his family and continues to proudly support The University of Texas Longhorns.

Head coaching record

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
University of Texas Longhorns[8] (Southwest Conference) (1968–1996)
1968 Texas 23-11 12-4 1st College World Series
1969 Texas 40-6 14-2 1st College World Series
1970 Texas 45-8 14-1 1st College World Series
1971 Texas 35-11 15-3 1st NCAA Regional
1972 Texas 50-9 12-6 T-1st College World Series
1973 Texas 50-7 15-3 1st College World Series
1974 Texas 54-8 20-4 1st College World Series
1975 Texas 59-6 23-1 1st College World Series Champions
1976 Texas 48-16 19-5 1st NCAA Regional
1977 Texas 53-10 17-7 2nd
1978 Texas 36-17 12-12 5th
1979 Texas 61-8 22-2 1st College World Series
1980 Texas 53-13 18-6 1st NCAA Regional
1981 Texas 62-11-1 16-5 1st College World Series
1982 Texas 59-7 12-4 1st College World Series
1983 Texas 66-14 18-3 1st College World Series Champions
1984 Texas 60-14 16-5 1st College World Series Runner-Up
1985 Texas 64-14 16-5 1st College World Series Runner-Up
1986 Texas 51-14 16-5 T-1st NCAA Regional
1987 Texas 61-11 18-3 1st College World Series
1988 Texas 58-11-1 18-2-1 1st NCAA Regional
1989 Texas 54-18 14-7 3rd College World Series Runner-Up
1990 Texas 51-17 15-5 2nd NCAA Regional
1991 Texas 48-19 14-7 1st NCAA Regional
1992 Texas 48-17 28-8 1st College World Series
1993 Texas 51-16 11-7 T-2nd College World Series
1994 Texas 43-21 9-9 4th NCAA Regional
1995 Texas 44-19 14-10 4th NCAA Regional
1996 Texas 39-24 17-7 1st NCAA Regional
Texas: 1466–377–2 (.795) 472–151–1 (.757)
Total: 1,466-377-2 (.795)

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

Achievements

National Championships: 1975, 1983

SWC Championships: 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1991, 1992, 1996

SWC Tournament Championships: 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1994

Collegiate Career Record: (1968–1996): 1466-377-2 (.795)

NCAA Tournament Record: 122-55 (.689)

National Coach of the Year: 1982, 1983

College World Series Appearances: 1968, 1969, 1970, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1987, 1989, 1992, 1993

Coached 35 First Team All Americans, 12 Second Team All Americans, and 9 Third Team All Americans

Inducted into the American Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame.

Inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame.

Named an inaugural member of the National College Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006.

Gustafson's Longhorns had a 39-0 record against minor league & semi-pro teams in exhibitions.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Gustafson Built Dynasty at South San Antonio"
  2. ^ "NCAA D1 College Baseball - History"
  3. ^ [https://texassports.com/aa.aspx?hid=143 "Gustafson - University of Texas Hall of Honor"
  4. ^ "Gustafson - ABCA Hall of Fame"
  5. ^ "Texas Sports Hall of Fame"
  6. ^ Collegiate Baseball Coach of the Year award
  7. ^ "2006 College Baseball Hall of Fame"
  8. ^ "Texas Year-By-Year Results"
1975 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 1975 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1975 NCAA Division I baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its twenty-ninth year. Eight regional competitions were held to determine the participants in the final event. Each region held a four team, double-elimination tournament, resulting in 32 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The twenty-ninth tournament's champion was Texas, coached by Cliff Gustafson, their first in a quarter century. The Most Outstanding Player was Mickey Reichenbach of Texas.

The 1975 tournament marked the first appearance for LSU, which would become a college baseball superpower in the succeeding decades, claiming six national championships between 1991 and 2009. LSU won the 1961 Southeastern Conference championship to earn an automatic bid to the NCAA tournament, but declined the bid to avoid playing integrated teams.

This season also marked the first appearance for Cal State Fullerton, which would claim four national championships from 1979 through 2004. Head coach Augie Garrido guided the Titans to three titles before moving to Texas, where he claimed three more titles from 2002 through 2009.

1975 Texas Longhorns baseball team

The 1975 Texas Longhorns baseball team represented the University of Texas in the 1975 NCAA Division I baseball season. The Longhorns played their home games at Disch-Falk Field. The team was coached by Cliff Gustafson in his 9th season at Texas.

The Longhorns won the College World Series, defeating the South Carolina Gamecocks in the championship game.

1983 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament

The 1983 NCAA Division I Baseball Tournament was played at the end of the 1983 NCAA Division I baseball season to determine the national champion of college baseball. The tournament concluded with eight teams competing in the College World Series, a double-elimination tournament in its thirty seventh year. Eight regional competitions were held to determine the participants in the final event. Six regions held a four team, double-elimination tournament while two regions included six teams, resulting in 36 teams participating in the tournament at the conclusion of their regular season, and in some cases, after a conference tournament. The thirty-seventh tournament's champion was Texas, coached by Cliff Gustafson. The Most Outstanding Player was Calvin Schiraldi of Texas.

1983 Texas Longhorns baseball team

The 1983 Texas Longhorns baseball team represented the University of Texas in the 1983 NCAA Division I baseball season. The Longhorns played their home games at Disch-Falk Field. The team was coached by Cliff Gustafson in his 16th season at Texas.

The Longhorns won the College World Series, defeating the Alabama Crimson Tide in the championship game.

1984 Texas Longhorns baseball team

The 1984 Texas Longhorns baseball team represented the University of Texas at Austin in the 1984 NCAA Division I baseball season. The Longhorns played their home games at Disch–Falk Field. The team was coached by Cliff Gustafson in his 17th season at Texas.

The Longhorns reached the College World Series final, but were eliminated by Cal State Fullerton.

1985 Texas Longhorns baseball team

The 1985 Texas Longhorns baseball team represented the University of Texas at Austin in the 1985 NCAA Division I baseball season. The Longhorns played their home games at Disch–Falk Field. The team was coached by Cliff Gustafson in his 18th season at Texas.

The Longhorns reached the College World Series final, but were eliminated by Miami (FL).

1989 Texas Longhorns baseball team

The 1989 Texas Longhorns baseball team represented the University of Texas at Austin in the 1989 NCAA Division I baseball season. The Longhorns played their home games at Disch–Falk Field. The team was coached by Cliff Gustafson in his 22nd season at Texas.

The Longhorns reached the College World Series final, but were eliminated by Wichita State.

Bill Bethea

William Lamar Bethea (born January 1, 1942), nicknamed "Spot", is a retired American professional baseball player who appeared in ten games in the Major Leagues as an infielder for the 1964 Minnesota Twins. The native of Houston threw and batted right-handed, stood 6 feet (1.8 m) tall and weighed 175 pounds (79 kg). He attended the University of Texas at Austin.

Originally signed by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1963, Bethea batted .371 in the Pioneer League (then Class A) that season and was selected by the Twins in the first-year player draft then in effect. He spent most of 1964 with the Double–A Charlotte Hornets before his recall to Minnesota after the September 1 roster expansion.

In his first MLB at bat (in his fourth game played), on September 20, 1964, at Fenway Park, Bethea doubled off Ed Connolly of the Boston Red Sox, driving home Bob Allison from first base for his first run batted in in the Majors. It sparked the Twins to a 12–4 victory. In his brief big-league trial, however, Bethea collected only five total hits and two RBI in ten games played and 30 at bats. He returned to the minor leagues in 1965 and played through the 1969 season. He then served as an assistant coach for the Texas Longhorns baseball program for 21 years, working as an aide to Cliff Gustafson, before becoming head baseball coach of Arkansas State University from 1991–2002, compiling a 311–310 record.

Billy Disch

William John Disch (October 15, 1872 – February 3, 1953) was an American baseball player and coach. He served as the head baseball coach at the University of Texas at Austin from 1911 to 1939 and as an advisory coach for 12 seasons afterwards. Often called the Connie Mack of college baseball, Disch earned a 513–180–12 record at Texas and garnered 20 Southwest Conference titles. At the time he coached, there were no NCAA postseason playoffs for national honors. Along with Bibb Falk, Disch is one of the two namesakes of UFCU Disch–Falk Field.

He was listed as a scout for the Boston Red Sox of Major League Baseball in 1948.

Blair Cherry

Johnson Blair Cherry (August 7, 1901 – September 10, 1966) was a baseball and football coach for the University of Texas at Austin, and is a member of the Longhorn Hall of Honor and the Texas Sports Hall of Fame.

Charles A. Keith

Charles Alexander Keith (February 28, 1883 – June 22, 1960) was an American football, basketball and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at Eastern Kentucky University in 1912 after serving as the head baseball coach at the University of Texas in 1910. Keith was a Rhodes Scholar and a member of the faculty at Eastern Kentucky for 41 years.

College World Series

The College World Series (CWS) is an annual June baseball tournament held in Omaha, Nebraska. The CWS is the culmination of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Baseball Championship tournament—featuring 64 teams in the first round—which determines the NCAA Division I college baseball champion. The eight participating teams are split into two, four-team, double-elimination brackets, with the winners of each bracket playing in a best-of-three championship series.

Collegiate Baseball Newspaper

Collegiate Baseball Newspaper (also known as Collegiate Baseball Magazine and Collegiate Baseball) is an American publication based in Arizona that considers itself the "voice of amateur baseball" which has been published for over 40 years. It is most noted for handing out the following awards: Collegiate Baseball Player of the Year, Collegiate Baseball Coach of the Year, and Collegiate Baseball All-Americans.It is published twice a month from January until June, and then once each in September and October.The "Collegiate Baseball" newspaper poll is college sports' oldest baseball poll. A ranking of the top 30 teams is released prior to the season, weekly throughout the season, and after the conclusion of the College World Series. It started with the 1957 college baseball season.

H. R. Schenker

Henry Richard Schenker (April 21, 1882 – May 3, 1922) was an American football and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at the University of Texas at Austin in 1906 and at Mercer University in 1907, compiling a career college football record of 12–4. Schenker was also the head baseball coach at Texas in the spring of 1907, tallying a mark of 16–8.

Schenker was born on April 21, 1882 in Holyoke, Massachusetts. He graduated from Yale University in 1905. He died on May 3, 1922 in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Kenedy, Texas

Kenedy is a city in Karnes County, Texas, United States, named for Mifflin Kenedy, who bought 400,000 acres (1,600 km2) and wanted to develop a new town that would carry his name. The population was 3,296 at the 2010 census, down from 3,487 at the 2000 census.

List of college baseball coaches with 1,100 wins

This is a list of NCAA baseball coaches with 1,100 career wins through the completion of the 2017 season.

National College Baseball Hall of Fame

The National College Baseball Hall of Fame is an institution operated by the College Baseball Foundation serving as the central point for the study of the history of college baseball in the United States. In partnership with the Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library located on the campus of Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas, the Hall of Fame inducts former collegiate players and coaches who have met selection criteria of distinction.

Texas Longhorns baseball

The Texas Longhorns baseball team represents The University of Texas at Austin in NCAA Division I intercollegiate men's baseball competition. The Longhorns currently compete in the Big 12 Conference.

The University of Texas began varsity intercollegiate competition in baseball in 1894. Texas is the winningest NCAA Division I college baseball program in terms of win percentage, with an all-time win-loss record of 3558–1323–32 (.727). The Longhorns rank second in all-time wins as of June 11, 2018, behind the Fordham Rams. As of the end of the 2018 conference season, Texas has won 78 regular season conference championships and 16 conference tournament championships in baseball.The Longhorns have won six NCAA baseball national championships (1949, 1950, 1975, 1983, 2002, 2005) — tied with LSU and second to Southern California's total of 12 — and have been the runner-up in the College World Series (CWS) Championship Games on six other occasions (1953, 1984, 1985, 1989, 2004, 2009). Texas holds the records for most appearances in the College World Series (36), most individual CWS games won (85), most overall NCAA Tournament games won (240), and most NCAA Tournament appearances (59); the second-place programs in these categories have 25 CWS appearances (Miami), wins in 74 CWS games (Southern California), 192 overall NCAA Tournament wins (Florida State and Miami), and 56 NCAA Tournament appearances (Florida State), as of June 11, 2018.

Former Longhorns who have gone on to success in Major League Baseball include Roger Clemens, Calvin Schiraldi, Burt Hooton, Keith Moreland, Spike Owen, Mark Petkovsek, Greg Swindell, Brandon Belt, and Huston Street.

From 1997 to 2016, the Longhorns were led by head coach Augie Garrido, who holds the record for most wins in NCAA baseball history. The team is currently led by third-year head coach David Pierce. Texas plays its home games at UFCU-Disch-Falk Field.

Players
Coaches
Veteran players
(pre-1947 era)

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.