Cliff Floyd

Cornelius Clifford Floyd Jr. (born December 5, 1972) is a former Major League Baseball left fielder, and is also currently a co-host on Sirius XM Radio.

Cliff Floyd
Cliff Floyd with the Tampa Bay Rays
Floyd batting for the Rays on September 22, 2008
Left fielder
Born: December 5, 1972 (age 46)
Chicago, Illinois
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 18, 1993, for the Montreal Expos
Last MLB appearance
June 17, 2009, for the San Diego Padres
MLB statistics
Batting average.278
Home runs233
Runs batted in865
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Early years

Cliff Floyd warmup
Floyd with the Mets

Floyd was born to parents Cornelius Clifford Floyd, Sr. and Olivia Floyd. After spending 13 years as an only child, Floyd was joined by brother Julius. Sister Shanta was later adopted when the Floyds noticed her as a six-year-old classmate of Julius' who had been troublesome for her then adoptive parents. The three siblings were raised in Markham, Illinois, a small suburb south west of Chicago. Floyd's father, a former Marine, worked double shifts at a U.S. Steel plant in Chicago to allow the family to live in a safe and stable neighborhood.

At Thornwood High School in South Holland, Illinois, Floyd was a three-sport star in baseball, football, and basketball. In basketball, he led his high school to the Class AA Sectional Playoffs. In leading his team to the Illinois state baseball championship as a senior, he hit .508 with 130 RBI during the final two years of his high school prep career. He was heavily recruited by Arizona State University, Stanford, and Creighton University and signed a letter of intent to play for head coach Jim Hendry at Creighton.[1] However, when the Montreal Expos drafted him as the 14th pick in the 1st round of the 1991 Major League Baseball draft, Floyd chose to go to the minor leagues.

Major league career

Jim Lefebvre & Cliff Floyd
Floyd talking to hitting coach Jim Lefebvre for the San Diego Padres on March 5, 2009

Montreal Expos

Floyd made his major league debut in 1993, playing in 10 games with the Expos.

Florida Marlins

In 1997, Floyd was traded from the Expos to the Florida Marlins for Dustin Hermanson and Joe Orsulak. In 1998, Floyd earned a starting position in the Marlins' outfield. In 2000, in 420 at-bats, he hit .300 with 22 home runs and 91 RBI.

Second Stint with Expos

In 2002, Floyd was traded from the Marlins back to the Expos, with Claudio Vargas, Wilton Guerrero, and cash, for Graeme Lloyd, Mike Mordecai, Carl Pavano, Justin Wayne, and Donald Levinski.

Boston Red Sox

Later that year, Floyd was traded from the Expos to the Boston Red Sox for Sun-woo Kim and Song Seung-jun.[2]

New York Mets

In 2003, Floyd was signed by the New York Mets. He played well for the Mets, but was hampered by injuries in 2003 and 2004. However, Floyd stayed healthy in 2005 and responded with a career-high and team-leading 34 home runs. The next year, though, Floyd was once again limited by injuries and only played in 97 games during New York's division-winning year. He caught the division-clinching out for the Mets, but was slowed by injuries in the playoffs for New York, only recording twelve at-bats in his team's ten postseason games.

Chicago Cubs

In 2007, Floyd agreed to a deal with his hometown Chicago Cubs for the 2007 season, with an option for 2008. Floyd missed nine games in August 2007 to mourn the death of his father, Cornelius. He returned on August 21, 2007, to play the San Francisco Giants, where he hit a game-winning RBI.[3]

Tampa Bay Rays

On December 14, 2007, Floyd signed a $3 million, one-year contract with the Tampa Bay Rays. Floyd spent 2008 platooning for the Rays at DH against righties.

San Diego Padres

On February 5, 2009, Floyd agreed to a one-year contract with the San Diego Padres.[4]

On October 8, 2009, the Padres released Floyd.

Broadcasting career

On February 22, 2010, Floyd accepted a broadcasting job with Fox Sports Florida.

Floyd also appears on NBC Sports Talk on the new NBC Sports Network and on MLB Network.

Floyd made his debut in the broadcasting booth for FOX Sports Baseball Night in America on June 21, 2014.

In 2015, Floyd joined SportsNet New York where he would be an analyst for New York Mets games. On March 8, 2015, Floyd broadcast his first Mets game, a spring training game against the Boston Red Sox on WPIX-TV, with Gary Cohen doing play-by-play.

Floyd currently hosts on SiriusXM's MLB Network Radio as well as SiriusXM's Fantasy Sports Radio.

In 2018, Floyd joined Sportsnet to become a featured analyst for the network's Toronto Blue Jays coverage.[5]

Personal life

Floyd lives in Florida with his longtime companion Maryanne Manning, the couple's two children, his mother, and the two children of his sister Shanta. Shanta died in 2006 after a long battle with cancer.

He appeared on Season 9 and 10 of Dragons' Den.

See also

References

  1. ^ Botte, Peter (November 20, 2004). "Mets Eye Deal For Johnson (Nick)". NY Daily News. Retrieved 15 November 2017.
  2. ^ http://www.baseballamerica.com/today/news/020730floyd.html
  3. ^ "Yahoo". Yahoo.
  4. ^ Jayson Stark (2009-02-05). "Source: Floyd, Padres agree to deal". espn.com. Retrieved 2009-02-05.
  5. ^ "Joe Siddall joins Blue Jays Central as TV analyst on Sportsnet". Sportsnet.ca. Retrieved 2018-04-18.

External links

Honorary titles
Preceded by
Melvin Nieves
1992
Youngest Player in the
National League

1993
Succeeded by
Ismael Valdez
1994
1991 Montreal Expos season

The 1991 Montreal Expos season was the 23rd season in franchise history. After several winning seasons, the Expos faltered in 1991, winning only 20 of its first 49 games. Manager Buck Rodgers was replaced as manager by Tom Runnells. The team ultimately finished 71-90.

1995 Montreal Expos season

The 1995 Montreal Expos season was the 27th season in franchise history.

1997 Florida Marlins season

The Florida Marlins' 1997 season was the fifth season for the Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise in the National League. It would begin with the team attempting to improve on their season from 1996. Their manager was Jim Leyland. They played home games at Pro Player Stadium. They finished with a record of 92-70, posting the first winning season in franchise history and winning the NL Wild Card. They got through the National League playoffs and won the World Series over the Cleveland Indians.

1997 Montreal Expos season

The 1997 Montreal Expos season was the 29th season of the franchise. They finished 78-84, 23 games back of the Atlanta Braves in the NL East and 14 games back of the Florida Marlins in the Wild Card. They played the Toronto Blue Jays in Interleague play for the first time during the season.

2002 Boston Red Sox season

The 2002 Boston Red Sox season was the 102nd season in the franchise's Major League Baseball history. The Red Sox finished second in the American League East with a record of 93 wins and 69 losses, 10½ games behind the New York Yankees. The Red Sox did not qualify for the postseason, as the AL wild card was the Anaheim Angels who had finished second in the American League West with a record of 99–63.

2002 Florida Marlins season

The Florida Marlins' 2002 season was the tenth season for the Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise in the National League. It would begin with the team attempting to improve on their season from 2001. Their manager was Jeff Torborg. They played home games at Pro Player Stadium. They finished with a record of 79-83, 4th in the NL East.

2002 Montreal Expos season

The 2002 Montreal Expos season was the 34th season in franchise history.

2005 New York Mets season

The New York Mets' 2005 season was the 44th regular season for the Mets. They went 83-79 and finished 3rd in the NL East. They were managed by Willie Randolph. They played home games at Shea Stadium. The 2005 season is also noteworthy for being Mike Piazza's last season as a Met. In the last game of the season, he was given a long standing ovation from the fans at Shea Stadium.

2006 National League Division Series

The 2006 National League Division Series (NLDS), the opening round of the 2006 National League playoffs, began on Tuesday, October 3, and ended on Sunday, October 8, with the champions of the three NL divisions—along with a "wild card" team—participating in two best-of-five series. They were:

(1) New York Mets (Eastern Division champions, 97–65) vs. (4) Los Angeles Dodgers (Wild Card, 88–74); Mets win series, 3–0.

(2) San Diego Padres (Western Division champions, 88–74) vs. (3) St. Louis Cardinals (Central Division champions, 83–78); Cardinals win series, 3–1.The Mets and the Cardinals met in the NL Championship Series, with the Cardinals becoming the National League champion and going on to face the American League champion Detroit Tigers in the 2006 World Series.

2006 New York Mets season

The New York Mets' 2006 season was the 45th regular season for the Mets. They went 97-65 and won the NL East, a feat the team would not repeat until 2015. They were managed by Willie Randolph. They played home games at Shea Stadium. They used the marketing slogan of "The Team. The Time. The Mets." throughout the season.

Eastern League Most Valuable Player Award

The Eastern League Most Valuable Player Award (MVP) is an annual award given to the best player in minor league baseball's Eastern League. In 1962, Jim Ray Hart won the first ever Eastern League MVP Award.

First basemen, with 16 winners, have won the most among infielders, followed by third basemen (8), second basemen (2), and shortstops (1). Five catchers have also won the award. Three players who won the award were pitchers. Twenty-one outfielders have won the MVP Award, the most of any position.

Seven players from the Philadelphia Phillies Major League Baseball (MLB) organization have won the MVP Award, more than any other, followed by the Pittsburgh Pirates organization (6); the Baltimore Orioles, Cleveland Indians, and Montreal Expos organizations (5); the New York Mets, and the Toronto Blue Jays organizations (4); the Boston Red Sox, and the New York Yankees organizations (3); the Chicago Cubs, Chicago White Sox, Cincinnati Reds, Detroit Tigers, and Milwaukee Brewers organizations (2); and the Florida Marlins, Oakland Athletics, San Francisco Giants, and Texas Rangers organizations (1).

Eastern League Rookie of the Year Award

The Eastern League Rookie of the Year Award is an annual award given to the best rookie player in minor league baseball's Eastern League. In 1997, Cliff Floyd won the first ever Eastern League Rookie of the Year Award.

First basemen, with 7 winners, have won the most among infielders, followed by third basemen (3), shortstops (2), and catchers and second basemen (1). One player who won the award was a pitcher. Twelve outfielders have won the award, the most of any position.

Five players from the Reading Phillies/Fightin Phils have been selected for the Rookie of the Year Award, more than any other team in the league, followed by the Harrisburg Senators (5); the Akron Aeros/RubberDucks (4); the Binghamton Mets (3); the Altoona Curve and New Haven Ravens (2); and the Bowie Baysox, Portland Sea Dogs, New Hampshire Fisher Cats, and Trenton Thunder (1).

Seven players from the Philadelphia Phillies Major League Baseball (MLB) organization have won the Rookie of the Year Award, more than any other, followed by the Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals organization (5); the Cleveland Indians organization (4); the New York Mets organization (3); the Pittsburgh Pirates organization (2); and the Baltimore Orioles, Colorado Rockies, Florida Marlins, New York Yankees, St. Louis Cardinals, and Toronto Blue Jays organizations (1).

McCovey Cove

McCovey Cove is the unofficial name of a section of San Francisco Bay beyond the right field wall of Oracle Park, home of the San Francisco Giants, named after famed Giants first baseman Willie McCovey. The proper name for the cove is China Basin, which is the mouth of Mission Creek as it meets the bay. The cove is bounded along the north by Oracle Park, with a ferry landing and a breakwater at the northeast end. The southern shore is lined by China Basin Park and McCovey Point. To the east, it opens up to San Francisco Bay, while the west end of the cove is bounded by the Lefty O'Doul Bridge, named after San Francisco ballplayer and manager Lefty O'Doul.

Miami Marlins

The Miami Marlins are an American professional baseball team based in Miami, Florida. They compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) East division. Their home park is Marlins Park. Though one of only two MLB franchises to have never won a division title (the other is the Colorado Rockies), the Marlins have won two World Series championships as a wild card team.

The team began play as an expansion team in the 1993 season as the Florida Marlins and played home games from their inaugural season to the 2012 season at what was originally called Joe Robbie Stadium, which they shared with the Miami Dolphins of the National Football League (NFL). Since the 2012 season, they have played at Marlins Park in downtown Miami, on the site of the former Orange Bowl. The new park, unlike their previous home (which was criticized in its baseball configuration for poor sight lines in some locations), was designed foremost as a baseball park. Per an agreement with the city and Miami-Dade County (which owns the park), the Marlins officially changed their name to the "Miami Marlins" on November 11, 2011. They also adopted a new logo, color scheme, and uniforms.The Marlins have the distinction of winning a World Series championship in both seasons they qualified for the postseason, doing so in 1997 and 2003—both times as the National League wild card team, making them the only franchise in the major four North American professional sports leagues (MLB, NBA, NFL, NHL) to have never lost a playoff round. They defeated the American League (AL) champion Cleveland Indians in the 1997 World Series, with shortstop Édgar Rentería driving in second baseman Craig Counsell for the series-clinching run in the 11th inning of the seventh and deciding game. In the 2003 season, manager Jeff Torborg was fired after 38 games. The Marlins were in last place in the NL East with a 16–22 record at the time. Torborg's successor, 72-year-old Jack McKeon, led them to the NL wild card berth in the postseason; they defeated the New York Yankees four games to two in the 2003 World Series.

Ottawa Lynx

The Ottawa Lynx were a Minor League Baseball team that competed in the Triple-A International League (IL) from 1993 to 2007. The team's home field was Lynx Stadium in Ottawa, Ontario. Over 15 seasons, the team was an affiliate of the Montreal Expos (1993–2002), Baltimore Orioles (2003–2006), and Philadelphia Phillies (2007). At the time, it was the only IL franchise in Canada.

In late August 2006, the league approved the conditions to negotiate the sale of the team. The new owners moved the team to Allentown, Pennsylvania, beginning with the 2008 season, where it became known as the Lehigh Valley IronPigs.

South Suburban College

South Suburban College is a public community college in South Holland, Illinois. It has a second campus in Oak Forest, Illinois.

Thornwood High School

Thornwood High School is a public high school located in South Holland, Illinois, United States. It was built as part of Thornton Township High School District 205.

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