Cliff Battles

Clifford Franklin Battles (May 1, 1910 – April 28, 1981) was an American football halfback in the National Football League (NFL). Battles was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1968.

Cliff Battles
Cliff Battles Induction
No. 20
Position:Halfback
Personal information
Born:May 1, 1910
Akron, Ohio
Died:April 28, 1981 (aged 70)
Clearwater, Florida
Height:6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight:195 lb (88 kg)
Career information
High school:Akron (OH) Kenmore
College:West Virginia Wesleyan
Career history
As player:
As coach:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing yards:3,511
Rushing average:4.2
Receiving yards:546
Passing yards:590
Total touchdowns:31
Coaching record:4–16
Player stats at NFL.com

Early life

Battles was born in Akron, Ohio, the son of Frank Battles, a saltworker for the BFGoodrich and Firestone tire companies, and Della Battles.[1] He played high school football at Kenmore High School.[1] Kenmore today honors athletes who carry on Battles' tradition, those who letter in three sports their senior year, with the Cliff Battles Award. Kenmore High School is at the corner of 13th Street and Battles Avenue, but the avenue is not named after Cliff. It was so named before he became famous.

College career

Battles attended and played college football at West Virginia Wesleyan College.[2] His most prominent season was 1931, when he scored 15 touchdowns and had four extra points.[2] The best game of his college career was also in 1931 in a game against Salem College, when he scored seven touchdowns and had 354 rushing yards, 91 kick return yards, and 24 receiving yards, totalling 469.[2]

He acquired the nickname "Gip" (sometimes spelled "Gipp") because of his admiration for Notre Dame back George Gipp, the subject of Knute Rockne's "win one for the Gipper" speech.[3]

While at West Virginia Wesleyan, Battles won 15 letters in five sports – four each in football and track, three each in baseball and basketball, and one in tennis.[2] While there, he was a Phi Beta Kappa scholar and Rhodes Scholarship candidate.[1]

He was named to the West Virginia Hall of Fame in 1950 and the College Football Hall of Fame in 1955.[2]

While at West Virginia Wesleyan, Battles also played semipro football for the South Akron Awnings under the name of Jones.[1]

Professional career

After college, Battles got many offers from NFL teams including the New York Giants and Portsmouth Spartans, among other NFL teams. But he signed with the Boston Braves (now the Washington Redskins) in 1932, who offered him $175 per game, compared with a high of $150 from the other teams.[3]

In 1932, Battles won the NFL's rushing title as a rookie.[4] He also performed well during the 1933 season and on October 8, 1933, Battles, playing for the newly named Boston Redskins, became the first player to exceed 200 rushing yards in a game, finishing with 215 yards on 16 rushes and one touchdown against the Giants.[4]

In 1937, the Redskins moved from Boston to Washington, D.C. and acquired quarterback Sammy Baugh. For the 1937, Baugh and Battles combined their talents just as everyone had anticipated. During their last regular-season game, Battles scored three touchdowns and the Redskins beat the Giants for the Eastern Division title.[4] In the 1937 NFL Championship against the Chicago Bears a week later, Battles scored the first touchdown in a 28-21 victory that gave the Redskins their first NFL title.[4]

In what would end up being his last regular-season game on December 5, 1937, Battles ran for 165 yards against the Giants at the Polo Grounds. This was the record for most rushing yards for a player in the final regular-season game of his NFL career until Tiki Barber broke the record on December 30, 2006 with 234 rushing yards.[5]

In the 1937 NFL season, Battles was again the league's leading rusher with 874 yards on 216 carries and won all-league honors for the fifth time in six years. In six seasons, Battles totaled 3,511 yards rushing.[4] A two way threat, he also finished his career with 15 interceptions, including one returned for a touchdown.

After 1937, Battles hoped for a raise in salary. George Preston Marshall, the owner of the Redskins, refused to pay him more than $3,000 a year (the amount Battles had been paid since his rookie season).[4] Battles chose retirement instead, and left the game as a player at the end of 1937.

Coaching career

After the 1937 season, the Battles accepted a $4,000 job as an assistant football coach at Columbia University coached there from 1938 to 1943.[4] While at Columbia, Battles was also the head coach of the men's basketball team from 1942 to 1943. He then served in the United States Marine Corps during World War II.[1] After the war, Battles became head coach of the Brooklyn Dodgers of the All-America Football Conference from 1946 to 1947.[1]

After football

After the end of his coaching career, Battles became an associate with General Electric in the Washington Metropolitan Area before retiring in 1979.[3] He died on April 28, 1981 in Clearwater, Florida, and is buried in Parklawn Memorial Park in Rockville, Maryland.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Cliff Battles" (PDF). Pro Football Researchers. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-10-10. Retrieved 2008-06-18.
  2. ^ a b c d e "Cliff Battles". College Football Hall of Fame. Football Foundation. Retrieved 2008-06-17.
  3. ^ a b c d "Cliff Battles" (PDF). Pro Football Researchers. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-10-11. Retrieved 2008-06-18.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "Cliff Battles' HOF Profile". Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2008-06-17.
  5. ^ "Barber rushes for team-record 234 yards in Giants' win". ESPN. Retrieved 2008-06-17.

Further reading

  • Sullivan, George (1972). The Great Running Backs. New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons. pp. 49–53. ISBN 0-399-11026-7.

External links

Records
Preceded by
First
NFL career rushing yards leader
1937–1941
Succeeded by
Clarke Hinkle
Preceded by
First
NFL single-game rushing record
October 8, 1933 – November 12, 1950
Succeeded by
Gene Roberts
1932 All-Pro Team

The 1932 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1932 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, seven of the eight NFL coaches for the Associated Press (AP), the United Press, and Collyer's Eye (CE).Five players were selected for the first team by all three selectors: Portsmouth Spartans quarterback Dutch Clark; Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski; New York Giants end Ray Flaherty; Green Bay Packers tackle Cal Hubbard; and Chicago Bears guard Zuck Carlson.

1933 All-Pro Team

The 1933 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1933 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press, Red Grange for Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB).

1934 All-Pro Team

The 1934 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1934 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the Associated Press (AP), the United Press (UP), the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB) based on the composite view of the coaches of 10 NFL teams and a half dozen NFL officials, Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Five players were selected as first-team All-Pro players by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Chicago Bears halfback Beattie Feathers; Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski; Chicago Bears end Bill Hewitt; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1935 All-Pro Team

The 1935 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1935 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press (UP), the Green Bay Press-Gazette (GB), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. The following six players were selected to the first team by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; New York Giants halfback Ed Danowski; Chicago Cardinals end Bill Smith; Chicago Bears end Bill Karr; New York Giants tackle Bill Morgan; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1936 All-Pro Team

The 1936 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1936 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the United Press (UP), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the Chicago Daily News (CDN).Four players were selected for the first team by all four selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Boston Redskins halfback Cliff Battles; Chicago Bears end Bill Hewitt; and Green Bay Packers guard Lon Evans. Three others were selected for the first team by three selectors: Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski; Boston Redskins tackle Turk Edwards; and New York Giants center Mel Hein.

1937 All-Pro Team

The 1937 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1937 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the International News Service (INS), the United Press (UP), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).Four players were selected for the first team by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Green Bay Packers fullback Clarke Hinkle; Washington Redskins tackle Turk Edwards; and Chicago Bears guard George Musso. Three others were named to the first team by four selectors: Washington Redskins Sammy Baugh (NFL, INS, UP, NYDN; selected as a halfback); Chicago Cardinals end Gaynell Tinsley (NFL, UP, CE, NYDN); and Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar (NFL, UP, CE, NYDN). Three more were selected by three selectors: Washington Redskins halfback Cliff Battles (NFL, INS, NYDN); Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson (INS, CE, NYDN); and New York Giants center Mel Hein (NFL, INS, NYDN).

1937 NFL Championship Game

The 1937 National Football League Championship Game was the fifth championship game of the National Football League (NFL), held December 12 at Wrigley Field in Chicago with an attendance of 15,878. The game featured the Western Division champions Chicago Bears (9–1–1) and the Eastern Division champions Washington Redskins (8–3).

1937 NFL season

The 1937 NFL season was the 18th regular season of the National Football League. The Cleveland Rams joined the league as an expansion team. Meanwhile, the Redskins relocated from Boston to Washington, D.C.

The season ended when the Redskins, led by rookie quarterback Sammy Baugh, defeated the Chicago Bears in the NFL Championship Game.

1937 Washington Redskins season

The 1937 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 6th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their first in Washington, D.C..

The Boston Redskins moved to Washington after their runner-up 1936 season and become the Washington Redskins. In 1937 they repeated as Eastern Division champions and played the NFL championship game on the road against the Chicago Bears at Wrigley Field. The Redskins won the championship game, 28–21.

The Boston Redskins had won the Eastern Division title the previous season, but had poor attendance, prompting the owner George Preston Marshall to move south to his hometown. The Redskins selected quarterback Sammy Baugh from TCU in the first round of the 1937 NFL draft, on December 12, 1936, while still in Boston. Rookie Baugh led the league in passing in 1937 with a then-record 81 pass completions, and halfback Cliff Battles led the NFL in rushing with 874 yards.

1944 El Toro Flying Marines football team

The 1944 El Toro Flying Marines football team represented the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station during the 1944 college football season. The station was located in Orange County, California, near the town of El Toro (later renamed Lake Forest). The team compiled an 8–1 record and was ranked No. 16 in the final AP Poll. Lt. Col. Dick Hanley was the team's coach. Cliff Battles and Jim Tuttle were assistant coaches.

Ace Gutowsky

LeRoy Erwin "Ace" Gutowsky (August 2, 1909 – December 4, 1976) was an American football fullback. He played professional football for eight years from 1932 to 1939 and set the NFL career rushing record in October 1939. He held the Detroit Lions' career and single-season rushing records until the 1960s.

Battle (surname)

Battle or Battles are surnames that may refer to:

Albrey Battle (born 1976), American football player

Allen Battle (born 1968), American baseball player

Arnaz Battle (born 1980), American football player

Ashley Battle (born 1982), American basketball player

Cliff Battles (1910–1981), American football player

Cormac Battle (born 1972), Irish musician and radio presenter

Edgar Battle (born 1907), American jazz performer, composer and arranger

Greg Battle (born 1964), Canadian football player

Helen Battle (1903–1994), Canadian marine biologist

Hinton Battle (born 1956), American actor, dancer, and dance instructor

Howard Battle (born 1972), American baseball player

Jackie Battle (born 1983), American football player

Jim Battle (1901–1965), American baseball player

John Battle (basketball) (born 1962), American basketball player

John Battle (politician) (born 1951), British politician

John S. Battle (1890–1972), American politician and Governor of Virginia

Jose Miguel Battle, Sr. (1929–2007), American mobster

Kathleen Battle (born 1948), American soprano

Kemp P. Battle (1831–1919), American politician and historian

Kenny Battle (born 1964), American basketball player

Lee Battle (born 1987), British actor

Lucius D. Battle (1918–2008), American diplomat

Mike Battle (born 1946), American football player

Pat Battle (born 1959), American television journalist

Simone Battle (1989–2014), American actress and singer

Tara Cross-Battle (born 1968), American volleyball player

Texas Battle (born 1980), American actor

Tyus Battle (born 1997), American basketball player

Vincent M. Battle (born 1940), American diplomat

William C. Battle (1920–2008), American diplomat

Brooklyn Dodgers (AAFC)

The Brooklyn Dodgers was an American football team that played in the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) from 1946 to 1948. The team is unrelated to the Brooklyn Dodgers that played in the National Football League from 1930 to 1943. The team folded prior to the 1949 season and was merged with the New York Yankees to form the Brooklyn-New York Yankees.

Carl M. Voyles

Carl Marvin "Dutch" Voyles (August 11, 1898 – January 11, 1982) was an American gridiron football coach, college athletics administrator, and sports executive. He served as the head football coach at Southwestern State Teachers College—now known as Southwestern Oklahoma State University—from 1922 to 1924, at the College of William & Mary from 1939 to 1943, and at Auburn University from 1944 to 1947, compiling a career college football record of 58–40–3. Voyles was the head of the Brooklyn Dodgers of the All-America Football Conference (AAFC) in 1948 and the Hamilton Tiger-Cats of the Canadian Football League (CFL) from 1950 to 1955.

List of National Football League career rushing yards leaders

This is a list of National Football League running backs by total career rushing yards. This list includes all running backs who have rushed for at least 10,000 yards. Emmitt Smith has held the all-time rushing yards record since 2002.

List of National Football League rushing champions

In American football, running (also referred to as rushing) is, along with passing, one of the two main methods of advancing the ball down the field. A running play generally occurs when the quarterback hands or tosses the ball backwards to the running back, but other players, such as the quarterback, can run with the ball. In the National Football League (NFL), the player who has recorded the most rushing yards for a season is considered the winner of the rushing title for that season. In addition to the NFL rushing champion, league record books recognize the rushing champions of the American Football League (AFL), which operated from 1960 to 1969 before being absorbed into the National Football League in 1970.The NFL did not begin keeping official records until the 1932 season. The average amount of yardage the rushing champion has gained has increased over time—since the adoption of the 14-game season in 1961, all but two rushing champions have recorded over 1,000 yards rushing, and the adoption of the 16-game season in 1978 has resulted in many rushing champions recording over 1,500 rushing yards. Seven rushing champions have recorded over 2,000 rushing yards, a feat first accomplished by O. J. Simpson in 1973 and most recently accomplished by Adrian Peterson in 2012.

The player with the most rushing titles is Jim Brown, who was the rushing champion eight times over his career. Eric Dickerson, Emmitt Smith, O. J. Simpson, Steve Van Buren, and Barry Sanders are tied for the second-most rushing titles, each having won four times. Jim Brown also holds the record for the most consecutive rushing titles with five, having led the league in rushing each year from 1957 to 1961. Steve Van Buren, Emmitt Smith, and Earl Campbell each recorded three consecutive rushing titles. The Cleveland Browns have recorded the most rushing titles with eleven; the Dallas Cowboys rank second, with seven rushing titles. The most recent rushing champion is Ezekiel Elliott of the Dallas Cowboys, who led the league with 1,434 yards rushing over the 2018 season.

List of Washington Redskins rushing leaders

The List of Washington Redskins football rushing leaders includes lists of Washington Redskins rushing single–season and career records for yardage, carries and touchdowns by Washington quarterbacks and running backs. The Redskins compete in the East Division of the National Football Conference. The franchise was founded as the Boston Braves, named after the local baseball franchise. The team changed their name to the Redskins in 1933 and moved to Washington, D.C. in 1937.The Redskins have played over one thousand games. In those games, the club won five professional American football championships including two NFL Championships and three Super Bowls. The franchise captured ten NFL divisional titles and six NFL conference championships.The Redskins won the 1937 and 1942 Championship games, as well as Super Bowl XVII, XXII and XXVI. They also played in and lost the 1936, 1940, 1943 and 1945 Championship games, as well as Super Bowl VII and XVIII. They have made twenty-two postseason appearances, and have an overall postseason record of 23 wins and 17 losses. Only four teams have appeared in more Super Bowls than the Redskins: the Dallas Cowboys (eight), Pittsburgh Steelers (six), Denver Broncos (six), and New England Patriots (six); the Redskins' five appearances are tied with the San Francisco 49ers, Oakland Raiders and Miami Dolphins.

Mal Stevens

Marvin Allen "Mal" Stevens (April 14, 1900 – December 6, 1979) was an American football player, coach, naval officer, and orthopedic surgeon. He served as the head football coach at Yale University from 1928 to 1932 and at New York University from 1934 to 1941, compiling a career college football record of 54–45–10. He was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame as a player in 1974.

Max Krause

Max Joseph Krause (April 5, 1909 – July 11, 1984) was an American football running back in the National Football League (NFL) for the New York Giants and the Washington Redskins.

Cliff Battles—awards and honors

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