Claude Seignolle

Claude Seignolle (25 June 1917[1] – 13 July 2018)[2] was a French author. His main interests were folklore and archaeology before he turned to fiction. He has also written under the pseudonyms 'Starcante', 'S. Claude' and 'Jean-Robert Dumoulin'.

Claude Seignolle
Claude Seignolle

Early and later life

At the age of twelve his family moved to Chatenay-Malabry and he went to school in Lakanal at Sceaux where his history teacher encouraged his interests in archaeology. He was expelled from this school for absenteeism.

He later joined the French Prehistoric Society, where he met the renowned folklorist Arnold Van Gennep. With his brother Jacques, Claude toured Hurepoix for two years collecting folklore and legends, and in 1937 he co-wrote with his brother The Folklore of Hurepoix, which was praised by Pierre Mac Orlan and Blaise Cendrars. In 1945 he published his first novel Le Rond des sorciers.

He lived in the liberation St. Montaine, still in Sologne, where he collected local folklore and stories that inspired several of his books. Seignolle wrote several books of supernatural horror, including The Accursed.[3] He is considered by some to be one of the best French fantasists; Lawrence Durrell has written of Seignolle: "The devils, the werewolves and the vampires...appear in his novels as disturbing realities, and the attitude he adopts towards them is so matter-of-fact that the reader rapidly finds himself believing in them...."[3] Horror historian R.S. Hadji included Seignolle on his list of the greatest horror writers.[4]

He turned 100 in June 2017[5] and died in July 2018 at the age of 101.[6]

Awards

In November 2008 he received the Prix Alfred Verdaguer from the French Academy.[7]

A literary prize bearing his name recognizes the works relating to French folklore. It is awarded annually since 2004, in Épinal, at the Festival Imaginales.

Bibliography of works in English

  • Man with Seven Wolves, The Child's World (Minn.), 1992 (novel, with Jacqueline Kergueno)
  • The Accursed, George Allen & Unwin Ltd. (London), 1967 (two novellas)
  • The Nightcharmer: And Other Tales, Texas A&M University Press (College Station, Texas), 1983 (stories)
  • The Black Cupboard, Ex Occidente (Bucharest, Romania), 2010 (novella)

References

  1. ^ Seignolle, Claude (1959). Le Diable en Sabots.- le Rond des Sorciers. Présentation d'Andre Rousseaux (in French). Slatkin Reprint. p. 184. ISBN 2051003106.
  2. ^ Claude Seignolle, l'insaisissable centenaire (in French)
  3. ^ a b Franz Rottensteiner, The Fantasy Book:an illustrated history from Dracula to Tolkien. Collier Books, 1978, (p. 140). ISBN 0-02-053560-0
  4. ^ "13 Supreme Masters of Weird Fiction" by R.S Hadji.Rod Serling's The Twilight Zone Magazine, May–June 1983. [1] (p. 84)
  5. ^ http://www.sudouest.fr/2017/06/26/per-ne-n-saber-mai-de-veire-occitan-blogs-sudouest-fr-claude-seignolle-a-100-ans-3564308-3.php
  6. ^ http://peuple-feerique.com/fees-lutins-elfes/2018/07/claude-seignolle-le-diable-en-sabots-sen-est-alle/
  7. ^ Drouet S, Claude Seignolle sous la coupole, Le Journal de la Sologne, Hiver 2008, p. 4-5

External links

1917

1917 (MCMXVII)

was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1917th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 917th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1917, the Gregorian calendar was

13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

2018

2018 (MMXVIII)

was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2018th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 18th year of the 3rd millennium, the 18th year of the 21st century, and the 9th year of the 2010s decade.

2018 was designated as the third International Year of the Reef by the International Coral Reef Initiative.

2018 in France

This article lists major events that happened in 2018 in France.

2018 in literature

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 2018.

Annie Cordy

Léonie, Baroness Cooreman, known by the stage name Annie Cordy (born 16 June 1928), is a Belgian film actress and singer. She has appeared in 50 films since 1954. She has staged many memorable appearances at Bruno Coquatrix' famous Paris Olympia. Her version of "La Ballade de Davy Crockett" was number 1 in the charts for five weeks in France in August 1956.

She was born in Laeken, Belgium, where in 2004, King Albert II of Belgium bestowed upon her the title of Baroness in recognition for her life's achievements.

Cheval Mallet

The Cheval Mallet (or Malet, meaning Mallet Horse) describes a fabulous and evil horse mentioned in folklore around the French Vendée, Poitou, and more frequently in the Pays de Retz, near Lac de Grand Lieu. It was supposed to appear at night or in the middle of the night as a beautiful white or black horse, saddled and bridled, and tempt travelers exhausted by a long journey. Several legends about the unwary who rode this horse, and never returned unless you have them on the price of travel or protection spell as a medal of St. Benedict.

A feast was also known as horse Merlette, Merlet or Mallet in the town of Saint-Lumine-de-Coutais, it had a military function, cathartic celebration of renewal or carnival, and featured several actors around one oak, one disguised as a horse. It was opposed by the ecclesiastical authorities and banned in 1791.

Deaths in July 2018

The following is a list of notable deaths in July 2018.

Entries for each day are listed alphabetically by surname. A typical entry lists information in the following sequence:

Name, age, country of citizenship at birth, subsequent country of citizenship (if applicable), reason for notability, cause of death (if known), and reference.

Eric H. du Plessis

Éric Hollingsworth du Plessis (born in France, September 19, 1950) is an author and educator living in Radford, Va. He is professor of French Studies at Radford University, Radford, Virginia and director of the Radford University's French Program at The Universite Catholique de l'Ouest in Angers, France Centre International Des Études Françaises.

Du Plessis has published books, articles, book chapters and encyclopedia entries on literature, linguistics, and historical/cultural studies in such journals and encyclopedias as Revue de Littérature Comparée, Poe Studies, European Studies Journal, Dalhousie French Studies, Cahiers du CIRhill, Short Story Criticism, The World Education Encyclopedia, ALFA and the World Press Encyclopedia.

François Angelier

François Angelier (born 22 August 1958) is a French journalist, presenter, essayist, biographer and author of fantasy novels.

June 25

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List of centenarians (authors, editors, poets and journalists)

The following is a list of centenarians – specifically, people who became famous as authors, poets and journalists – known for reasons other than their longevity. For more lists, see lists of centenarians.

Pierre Dubois (author)

Pierre Dubois (born 19 July 1945), is an internationally recognized French specialist in everything related to enchantment. He is an author, Franco-Belgian comics (bande dessinée) scriptwriter, storyteller and lecturer at the origin of renewed interest in fairies and little people in France.

Fascinated quite young by fairy tales and Fairytale fantasy, he became an illustrator after only a short study of Fine Arts.

He has brought together local legends and recreated them in radio and television shows for over thirty years.

He is the inventor of elficology (elficologie) as a name for the study of the "little people" (fairies and other similar beings), although it was originally just a joke on his part.

His first comic book was published in 1986 and knew only a success of esteem.

Since then he has produced one each year and also made regular appearances on television and at conferences, always in the area of fairy tales, dreams and legends related to the fairies, who have become his specialty.

It is largely thanks to his encyclopedias of fairies, imps, and elves, results of twenty years of research and published in the 1990s, that Pierre Dubois won his international recognition as a French specialist in everything involving magic

.

These encyclopedias sold thousands of copies at a time when they were the very first works of their kind in France. Since then the works of Pierre Dubois, whether art books, encyclopedias, collections of short stories or collections of stories for adults or children have experienced a certain success, marked by scholarship and humor everywhere. Pierre Dubois has himself become a source of inspiration for other writers and designers who have taken up the idea of elficology.

Richard Ely (writer)

Christophe Richard Ely Van De Ponseele (born March 20, 1974) - professionally known as Richard Ely - is a Belgian writer, journalist and ethnobotanist. Main instigator of the ‘Trolls & Legends” Festival in Mons (Belgium), he is also the former editor-in-chief of Khimaira magazine and the creator of the blog Peuple féerique to which he still contributes today. His books are mainly specialized in fairies and/or nature.

The Four Sons of Aymon

The Four Sons of Aymon (French: [Les] Quatre fils Aymon, Dutch: De Vier Heemskinderen, German: Die Vier Haimonskinder), sometimes also referred to as Renaud de Montauban (after its main character) is a medieval tale spun around the four sons of Duke Aymon: the knight Renaud de Montauban (also spelled Renaut, Renault, Italian: Rinaldo di Montalbano, Dutch: Reinout van Montalbaen), his brothers Guichard, Allard and Richardet, their magical horse Bayard (Italian: Baiardo), their adventures and revolt against the emperor Charlemagne. The story had a European success and echoes of the story are still found today in certain folklore traditions.

The Weird

The Weird: A Compendium of Strange and Dark Stories is an anthology of weird fiction edited by Ann and Jeff VanderMeer.

Published on 8 May 2012, it contains 110 short stories, novellas and short novels. At 1,152 pages in the hardcover edition, it is probably the largest single volume of fantastic fiction ever published, according to Locus.

Weird fiction

Weird fiction is a subgenre of speculative fiction originating in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. John Clute defines weird fiction as a "Term used loosely to describe Fantasy, Supernatural Fiction and Horror tales embodying transgressive material". China Miéville defines weird fiction thus: "Weird Fiction is usually, roughly, conceived of as a rather breathless and generically slippery macabre fiction, a dark fantastic (“horror” plus “fantasy”) often featuring nontraditional alien monsters (thus plus “science fiction”)." Discussing the "Old Weird Fiction" published in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Jeffrey Andrew Weinstock says, "Old Weird fiction utilises elements of horror, science fiction and fantasy to showcase the impotence and insignificance of human beings within a much larger universe populated by often malign powers and forces that greatly exceed the human capacities to understand or control them." Weird fiction either eschews or radically reinterprets ghosts, vampires, werewolves, and other traditional antagonists of supernatural horror fiction. Weird fiction is sometimes symbolised by the tentacle, a limb-type absent from most of the monsters of European folklore and gothic fiction, but often attached to the monstrous creatures created by weird fiction writers such as William Hope Hodgson, M. R. James, and H. P. Lovecraft. Weird fiction often attempts to inspire awe as well as fear in response to its fictional creations, causing

commentators like Miéville to say that weird fiction evokes a sense of the numinous. Although "weird fiction" has been chiefly used as a historical description for works through the 1930s, the term has also been increasingly used since the 1980s, sometimes to describe slipstream fiction that blends horror, fantasy, and science fiction.

Yule log (cake)

A Yule log (or bûche de Noël French pronunciation: ​[byʃ də nɔɛl]) is a traditional dessert served near Christmas, especially in Belgium, France, Switzerland, Quebec, Lebanon and several former French colonies, as well as the United Kingdom and Catalonia. Made of sponge cake to resemble a miniature actual Yule log, it is a form of sweet roulade.

The original Yule log recipe emerged during the 19th century. It is traditionally made from a genoise, generally baked in a large, shallow Swiss roll pan, iced, rolled to form a cylinder, and iced again on the outside. The most common combination is basic yellow sponge cake and chocolate buttercream, though many variations that include chocolate cake, ganache, and icings flavored with espresso or liqueurs exist.

Yule logs are often served with one end cut off and set atop the cake, or protruding from its side to resemble a chopped off branch. A bark-like texture is often produced by dragging a fork through the icing, and powdered sugar sprinkled to resemble snow. Other cake decorations may include actual tree branches, fresh berries, and mushrooms made of meringue or marzipan.

The name bûche de Noël originally referred to the Yule log itself, and was transferred to the dessert only after the custom had fallen out of use, presumably during the first half of the 20th century. By 1945, it referred to the cake.

Édouard Brasey

Édouard Brasey is a French novelist, essayist, scriptwriter and story-teller born on March 25, 1954. Author of more than seventy works, many of which have been translated into English, Russian, Japanese, Spanish, Portuguese and Italian. He specialises in the themes of the esoteric, fables, legends and fantasy. He won a prize of Imaginales in 2006 for La Petite Encyclopédie du Merveilleux, and a prize Merlin in 2009 for his novel La Malédiction de l'Anneau. Subsequently, he has become essentially a novelist, notably published by Calmann-Lévy. His historical-esoteric thriller that was published in 2013, Le Dernier Pape, anticipated the abdication of Benoît XVI.

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