Claude Humphrey

Claude B. Humphrey (born June 29, 1944) is a former American football defensive end in the National Football League (NFL) for the Atlanta Falcons and Philadelphia Eagles. Humphrey was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2014.

Claude Humphrey
No. 87
Position:Defensive end
Personal information
Born:June 29, 1944 (age 74)
Memphis, Tennessee
Height:6 ft 4 in (1.93 m)
Weight:252 lb (114 kg)
Career information
High school:Memphis (TN) Lester
College:Tennessee State
NFL Draft:1968 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games:171
Safeties:2
Player stats at NFL.com

Professional career

Humphrey was drafted out of Tennessee State University in the first round of the 1968 NFL Draft with the third overall choice by the Falcons. Humphrey was an All-American in 1967.

Humphrey's stellar career included being named First-team All-Pro five times (1971–74, and 1977), Second- Team All-Pro three times (1969, 1970, 1976), and All-NFC six times (1970–74, 1977). He was second-team All-NFC in 1976 when Humphrey unofficially recorded a career high 15 quarterback sacks. In addition Humphrey was named to the Pro Bowl six times over the span of his career (1970–74 & 1977).

Humphrey finished out his career with the Philadelphia Eagles from 1979–81. In 1980 Humphrey was a designated pass rusher, recording a team high 14½ sacks helping the Eagles become NFC champions and earn a spot in Super Bowl XV. He finished his career with an unofficial 126½ career sacks with the Falcons and Eagles. He retired in 1981, the season before sacks were recorded as an official NFL statistic.

During Super Bowl XV, Humphrey was called for roughing the passer against Oakland Raiders quarterback Jim Plunkett. Humphrey picked up the penalty flag and fired it back at referee Ben Dreith.

Humphrey is a member of the Georgia Hall of Fame and the Tennessee Hall of Fame. His alma mater (Tennessee State University) retired his number and inducted him into their Hall of Fame. His high school has also retired his jersey and he is a member of his high school Hall of Fame, and is a member of the Atlanta Falcons Ring of Honor.

Humphrey is a member of Phi Beta Sigma.

Outside Football

Claude Humphrey also had a guest appearance on The Dukes of Hazzard episode "Repo Men" in which he portrayed Big John, a counterfeiter.[1]

Pro Football Hall of Fame

Humphrey was a final 15 candidate in 2003, 2005, and 2006. On August 27, 2008, he was named as one of two senior candidates for the 2009 Hall of Fame election.[2] In August 2013, he was named as one of two senior candidates for the 2014 Hall of Fame election.

In February 2014, Claude Humphrey was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame on the senior ballot. During his time in football, Mr. Humphrey was a revolutionary pass rushing defensive lineman who paved the way for Reggie White, Bruce Smith, and fellow 2014 NFL HOF inductee Michael Strahan.

On August 2, 2014, Humphrey was officially inducted at the Enshrienment Ceremony where his bust, sculpted by Scott Myers, was unveiled.

References

  1. ^ "Q&A with Hall-of-Fame DE Claude Humphrey". atlantafalcons.com.
  2. ^ http://www.profootballhof.com/enshrinement/story.jsp?story_id=2816

External links

1968 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1968 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's third year in the National Football League (NFL).

1968 NFL season

The 1968 NFL season was the 49th regular season of the National Football League. As per the agreement made during the 1967 realignment, the New Orleans Saints and the New York Giants switched divisions; the Saints joined the Century Division while the Giants became part of the Capitol Division.

The season ended when the Baltimore Colts defeated the Cleveland Browns in the NFL Championship Game, only to be defeated by the American Football League's New York Jets in Super Bowl III 16–7 at the Orange Bowl in Miami. Subsequently, it was the first time in the history of professional football in which the NFL champion was not crowned as the world champion. One year later, this feat would be repeated, as the AFL champion Kansas City Chiefs defeated the NFL champion Minnesota Vikings in Super Bowl IV.

1969 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1969 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's fourth year in the National Football League (NFL). The team improved on their previous season's output of 2–12, winning six games. The Falcons had yet to reach the post season, and would not until 1978.

1970 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1970. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the consensus All-Pro team for 1970.

1971 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1971. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1971.

1971 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1971 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's sixth year in the National Football League (NFL). It was the first winning season in franchise history.

1972 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1972. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1972.

1972 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1972 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's seventh year in the National Football League (NFL). The team failed to improve on their previous season's output of 7–6–1, finishing 7–7 and failing to reach the playoffs. Standing at 7–5 the Falcons traveled to San Francisco with the NFC West division title on the line. However, the Falcons were never in the game and saw their playoff hopes end with a 20–0 shutout loss. Facing the Kansas City Chiefs in their final game of the season, Running Back Dave Hampton surpassed the 1,000-yard mark. However, a play later he is thrown for a six-yard loss and ends the season with 995 yards, as the Falcons lose and finish 7–7.

1973 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1973. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1973.

1974 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1974. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1974.

1976 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1976. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1976.

1976 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1976 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise's 11th year in the National Football League (NFL). The season saw the Falcons attempting to improve on their 4-10 record from 1975. However, they were only able to match the record, as they finished the 1976 season with an identical 4-10 record and missed the playoffs for the 11th straight season. After a 1-4 start to the season, head coach Marion Campbell was fired by general manager Pat Peppler, who himself would close out the season as the interim head coach and finish the season with a 3-6 record.

1977 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1977. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1977.

1977 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1977 Atlanta Falcons season was the team's 12th year in the National Football League. The team finished the season 7–7, and did not make the NFL's postseason.

Although the Falcons' offense struggled, the defense was dominant. The Falcons' 129 points allowed not only led the league, but established an all-time NFL record for fewest points allowed in a 14-game NFL season. Atlanta's 3,242 total yards allowed were second-fewest in the league, and the Falcons' 1,384 passing yards allowed was by far the best in the NFL in 1977.Football analytics site Cold Hard Football Facts call the 1977 Falcons "the stingiest defense of the Super Bowl Era. In fact, it was the stingiest defense since World War II. Atlanta surrendered just 9.2 PPG, or a total of 129 points in the 14-game season. For a little perspective: the 2012 Bills gave up 131 points in their first four games. That unit was truly a no-name defense at its finest: despite its status as the stingiest defense since World War II, the 1977 Falcons sent only two defenders to the Pro Bowl: cornerback Rolland Lawrence and defensive end Claude Humphrey. [...] It was truly a one-hit wonder of a unit: the 1976 Falcons possessed one of the worst defenses in the league (22.3 PPG); and it largely fell apart in 1978 (18.1 PPG). The most famous personality on the 1977 Falcons was not a player but defensive assistant Jerry Glanville, who installed in a swarming style of play in Atlanta remembered as the "Grits Blitz" defense."

1988 Atlanta Falcons season

The 1988 Atlanta Falcons season was the franchise’s 23rd season in the National Football League (NFL). The team was marred by tragedy when cornerback David Croudip died on October 10 after a cocaine overdose. It would be the first of three player deaths of the team in the space of two seasons.

John Merritt

John Ayers Merritt (January 26, 1926 – December 13, 1983) was a head football coach at Jackson State University and Tennessee State University. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1994.

He was born in Falmouth, Kentucky, and is an alumnus of Kentucky State University, where he played guard on the football team from 1947 to 1949. He earned the nickname "Big John". He graduated in 1950 and earned a master's degree from the University of Kentucky in 1952.

He coached Jackson State University from 1953 to 1962, where he compiled a record of 63–37–5. Merritt led Jackson State to back-to-back appearances in the Orange Blossom Classic in 1961 and 1962 before being hired by what was then Tennessee A&I.

At Tennessee State (as Tennessee A&I was renamed in 1968), Merritt had four undefeated seasons, claimed four Midwest Athletic Association titles, seven black college football national championships: (1965, 1966, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1979 and 1982) and earned the school's first-ever NCAA Division I-AA playoff victory in 1982.

Merritt coached many players who went into the National Football League, among them were Ed "Too Tall" Jones, Joe Gilliam, Claude Humphrey, Mike Hegman, and Richard Dent.

His coaching record at Tennessee State was 172–33–7, and had an .828 winning percentage—far and away the best in school history.

John Merritt Boulevard in Nashville, Tennessee is named in his honor, and the Tennessee State football team opens every season with the John Merritt Classic game against Alabama A&M University, until recently the Classic headlines other HBCU teams, in particular 2015—Tennessee State will play host to Alabama State University on September 6, 2015.

List of Atlanta Falcons seasons

This article is a list of seasons completed by the Atlanta Falcons American football franchise of the National Football League (NFL). The list documents the season-by-season records of the Falcons' franchise from 1966 to present, including postseason records, and league awards for individual players or head coaches.

The Falcons did not record consecutive winning seasons until 2009, when the team won their final three games of the regular season and finished with a 9–7 record after winning their season finale against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. Atlanta has since added its first stretch of five straight winning seasons, with a 13–3 record in 2010, a 10–6 record in 2011, and a 13–3 record in 2012. The streak ended with a 4–12 record in 2013.

Scott Myers

Scott Myers (born 1958, USA) is an American painter and sculptor who lives and works in Texas. He graduated Texas A&M University in 1984 with a doctorate in veterinary medicine. He studied sculpture throughout Italy focusing on Florence, Venice and Rome. Sculpting in Tuscany, he cast his work in bronze at the prestigious Fonderia d'Arte Massimo Del Chiaro in Pietrasanta. In 1994, Myers became an elected member of the National Sculpture Society. On February 12, 2011, Myers was featured in the popular television show Texas Country Reporter. Myers was inducted in the inaugural class of the Haltom City High School Hall of Fame on March 10, 2011.Myers is best known for sculpting busts for the Pro Football Hall of Fame, including Chris Doleman, Chris Hanburger, Rickey Jackson, Russ Grimm, Bob Hayes, Randall McDaniel, Fred Dean, Emmitt Thomas, Bruce Matthews, Rayfield Wright, Elvin Bethea, Curley Culp, Claude Humphrey, Charles Haley and Kevin Greene.Myers' paintings focus mostly on ranch life and western landscapes, with horses and cowboys figuring prominently in his subject matter. His paintings combine bold color with a Monet-like layering of color and texture that makes him unique in the western art genre.

Tennessee State Tigers football

The Tennessee State Tigers are the college football team representing the Tennessee State University. The Tigers play in NCAA Division I Football Championship as a member of the Ohio Valley Conference.

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