Clarke Hinkle

William Clarke Hinkle (April 10, 1909 – November 9, 1988) was an American football player. He played on offense as a fullback, defense as a linebacker, and special teams as a kicker and punter. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame as part of its second class of inductees in 1964.

Known as one of the toughest players in the era of iron man football, Hinkle played for the Green Bay Packers from 1932 to 1941 and held the all-time National Football League (NFL) records for rushing yardage and carries when his playing career ended. He led the NFL in touchdowns (seven) in 1937, in points scored (58) in 1938, and in field goals made and field goal percentage in both 1940 and 1941. He was selected as a first- or second-team All-Pro in each of his 10 NFL seasons and helped lead the Packers to three NFL championship games and NFL championships in 1936 and 1939. His playing career was cut short in 1942 by military service.

A native of Toronto, Ohio, Hinkle also played college football for Bucknell from 1929 to 1931. He scored 50 points in a single game as a sophomore and led Bucknell to an undefeated season in 1931. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1971.

Clarke Hinkle
refer to caption
Hinkle at Pro Football Hall of Fame induction
Position:Fullback, linebacker
Personal information
Born:April 10, 1909
Toronto, Ohio
Died:November 9, 1988 (aged 79)
Steubenville, Ohio
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:202 lb (92 kg)
Career information
High school:Toronto (OH)
College:Bucknell
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Rushing yards:3,860
Rushing touchdowns:35
Field goals:28/47 (59.6%)
Points scored:379
Player stats at PFR

Early years

William Clarke Hinkle was born in Toronto, Ohio, located on the Ohio River approximately 40 miles west of Pittsburgh, in 1909.[1] He was the son of Charles Hinkle and Lillian Ault Clark, both Ohio natives. His father was an engineer and later a forger at a steel mill.[2][3][4] Hinkle attended Toronto High School.[1]

College

Hinkle played college football for Bucknell University, where he set several records for the Bucknell Bison football team as a fullback playing offense and defense. He scored eight touchdowns and scored 50 points in a game against Dickinson on Thanksgiving Day 1929.[5] He finished the 1929 season with 21 touchdowns and 128 points scored.[6] He had 37 touchdowns over his career at Bucknell from 1929 to 1931. In 1929, he led the East in scoring with 128 points. In 1931, he led the team to a 6–0–3 win-loss record.[7] Hinkle's coach at Bucknell, Carl Snavely, called him: "Without a doubt, the greatest defensive back I have ever seen or coached."[6]

Hinkle played for the East team in the East-West Shrine Game in San Francisco on New Year's Day 1932. He was the leading ground gainer in the game,[8] and a United Press correspondent wrote: "If there was a single star in the long drawn battle of line plunges and punting it was Clark [sic] Hinkle of Bucknell whose stabs through tackle were a revelation in driving power."[9]

While at Bucknell University he became a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity.[10]

Professional football

In January 1932, after watching Hinkle play in the Shrine Game, Curly Lambeau signed Hinkle to play professional football for the Green Bay Packers.[11][8][12] At the time, the Packers were the best team in the NFL, having won three consecutive NFL championships from 1929 to 1931. Hinkle played for the Packers for his entire ten-year NFL career, was selected as a first- or second-team All-Pro every year, and helped lead the Packers to NFL championships in 1936 and 1939.[1]

As a rookie in 1932, Hinkle appeared in 13 games and led the Packers with 331 rushing yards on 95 carries.[1] He quickly developed a reputation not only for his two-way play on both offense and defense, but also as the best punter in the NFL.[13] The 1932 Packers finished second in the NFL with a 10–3–1 record,[14] and Hinkle was selected as a first-team All-Pro in 1932 by Collyer's Eye magazine and as the second-team fullback (behind Bronko Nagurski) on the United Press (UP) and NFL All-Pro teams.[15] He was hailed by Curly Lambeau at the end of the 1932 season as a second Jim Thorpe,[16] and by some critics as "the greatest football player in the world today."[17]

After spending the off-season working for a steel construction firm in his home town of Toronto, Ohio, Hinkle returned to Green Bay in September 1933.[18] In his second NFL season, Hinkle again led the team with 413 rushing yards, but the Packers' record fell to 5–7–1,[19] the only losing season suffered by the Packers in their first 25 years in the NFL.[20] Despite the team's poor showing, Hinkle was selected as a second-team All-Pro by the UP, Chicago Daily News, and Green Bay Press-Gazette.[21]

Hinkle presented a rare combination of power, speed, and accurate kicking. In 1937, he led the NFL with seven touchdowns and ranked second with 552 rushing yards. In 1938, he led the NFL in scoring with 58 points scored on seven touchdowns, seven extra points, and three field goals.[1] He led the NFL in field goals and field goal percentage in both 1940 and 1941.[1][22] He also continued to excel as a punter, ranking second in the NFL in punting yards in 1939 and averaging 44.5 yards per punt in 1941.[1]

Hinkle's playing career was cut short after the 1941 season by wartime military service. He began his NFL career in 1932 at a salary of $5,000 and had his salary cut during the Great Depression, then restored to $5,000 in the late 1930s. He held out for and received $10,000 in his final season.[23] He finished his career with 3,860 rushing yards, 537 receiving yards, 316 passing yards, and 379 points scored on 44 touchdowns, 28 field goals, and 31 extra points.[1]

Reputation for toughness

Hinkle loved the intense physicality of football. According to one account, "Clark Hinkle loved contact. It didn't matter which side of the ball he was coming from, Hinkle loved delivering blows."[24] Ken Strong, another Hall of Fame back of the era, remembered the force of Hinkle's tackles: "When he hit you, you knew you were hit. Bells rang and you felt it all the way to your toes."[25] Another back, Johnny Sisk, said: "No one in the whole league ever bruised me more than Hinkle did. . . . Hinkle had a lot of leg action. I broke my shoulder twice tackling Mr. Hinkle."[26]

Hinkle's competition with Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski were especially memorable. Hinkle was the only player to knock Nagurski out of a game, and according to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, Hinkle's "creed was 'get to the Bronk before he gets to me.'"[27] Hinkle cited a 1934 collision with Nagurski as his greatest day in football. He recalled: "I was carrying the ball and Nagurski charged in to make the tackle. WHAM! We banged into each other. Nagurski had to be removed from the game with a broken nose and two closed eyes. Strangely enough, I suffered no ill effects and was able to continue playing."[28] Nagurski later called Hinkle the "toughest man I ever played against."[23] In the book, "Pain Gang: Pro Football's Fifty Toughest Players", Neil Reynolds included both Hinkle and Nagurski on his list of the toughest players in the history of the game.[29]

Hinkle's toughness remained to the end. On November 2, 1941, in his final game against the Chicago Bears, Hinkle had his leg torn open by an opponent's spike but returned late in the game to kick a game-winning field goal from the 44-yard line.[11][30]

Honors and records

When Hinkle's playing career ended, he held NFL career records with 3,860 rushing yards and 1,171 carries.[31] He surpassed the old record of 3,511 rushing yards held by Cliff Battles. Hinkle's rushing yardage record stood until 1949 when it was broken by Steve Van Buren.[32]

Hinkle received multiple honors and awards arising out of his accomplishments as a football player, including the following:

Family, military service, and later years

Hinkle's older brother Gordie Hinkle played minor league baseball as a catcher from 1930 to 1941 and for the Boston Red Sox in 1934.[4]

In December 1936, Hinkle was married in New York to Emilie Cobden.[42] His marriage ended immediately after World War II owing to difficulty readjusting to civilian life, causing Hinkle to, in his own words "get off the beam a little bit" and go "a little haywire."[43] After his divorce, Hinkle married again, but the union lasted only 33 days.[43]

In May 1942, following the United States entry into World War II, Hinkle enlisted in the United States Coast Guard and received the rank of lieutenant.[44] In the fall of 1942, he served as an assistant football coach at the United States Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut.[45] He also played five games for New London's professional Electric Boat Diesel football team.[46] He later served on convoy duty in the North African Campaign and as an air-sea rescuer off Newfoundland.[46]

Hinkle was discharged from the Coast Guard in 1946 and began working for Kimberly-Clark in Neenah, Wisconsin.[46] He later lived in Steubenville, Ohio, working as a sales representative for an industrial supply company.[47] He also worked in the late 1960s as a sports desk anchor for an Ohio television station.[48] He died in Steubenville in 1988 at age 79 following a long illness.[47] He was buried at Toronto Union Cemetery in Toronto, Ohio.

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Clarke Hinkle". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  2. ^ 1920 U.S. Census entry for Charles Hinkle and family. Son William C. age 10 born in Ohio.
  3. ^ 1930 U.S. Census entry for Charles Hinkle and family.
  4. ^ a b "Gordie Hinkle". Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  5. ^ "Hinkle Bucknell Fullback Leads Scoring". Daily Capital Journal (Salem, Oregon). December 2, 1929. p. 8.
  6. ^ a b c "Clarke "Lackawanna Express" Hinkle". National Football Foundation. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  7. ^ "W. Clarke Hinkle Biography". bucknellbison.com. Bucknell University. Retrieved July 22, 2016.
  8. ^ a b "Hinkle To Play As Grid Pro". The Danville (PA) Morning News. January 13, 1932. p. 3 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ "All-Eastern Grid Team Humbles Westerners, 6 to 0". Nevada State Journal. January 2, 1932. p. 7 – via Newspapers.com.
  10. ^ https://nicfraternity.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/fraternity_men_in_nfl_hall_of_fame-updated-6-18.pdf
  11. ^ a b Rick Gonsalves (2013). Placekicking in the NFL. McFarland. p. 222.
  12. ^ "Hinkle Turns Pro". The Shamokin (PA) Dispatch. August 19, 1932. p. 8 – via Newspapers.com.
  13. ^ "They Click First Year As Pros". The Racine (WI) Journal-Times. November 10, 1932. p. 15 – via Newspapers.com.
  14. ^ "1932 Green Bay Packers Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  15. ^ "1932 NFL All-Pros". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  16. ^ "Clark Hinkle Draws Praise From Followers In East". Green Bay Press-Gazette. February 15, 1933. p. 10 – via Newspapers.com.
  17. ^ "Clark Hinkle To Play Football On Island Of Hawaii". Shamokin (PA) News-Dispatch. December 20, 1932. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com.
  18. ^ "Clark Hinkle Here To Play With Bay Grid Squad Again". Green Bay Press-Gazette. September 8, 1933. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ "1932 Green Bay Packers Statistics & Players". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  20. ^ "Green Bay Packers Franchise Encyclopedia". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  21. ^ "1933 NFL All-Pros". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  22. ^ "Clarke Hinkle Is Champ Field Goal Kicker for 1941". Green Bay Press-Gazette. February 5, 1942. p. 15 – via Newspapers.com.
  23. ^ a b "Bronko Nagurski: Clark Hinkle's Toughest I Ever Faced". Nevada State Journal. October 10, 1966. p. 2 – via Newspapers.com.
  24. ^ Rob Reischel (2013). 100 Things Packers Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die. Triumph Books. p. 70. ISBN 1623682991.
  25. ^ Richard Whittingham (1984). What a Game They Played: An Inside Look at the Golden Era of Pro Football. University of Nebraska Press. p. 91. ISBN 0803298196.
  26. ^ Neil Reynolds (2006). Pain Gang: Pro Football's Fifty Toughest Players. Potomac Books, Inc. p. 68. ISBN 1597970131.
  27. ^ "Clarke Hinkle Bio". profootballhof.com. Pro Football Hall of Fame. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  28. ^ "Hinkle Racks Up Nagurski For Best Day In Football". The Pittsburgh Press. October 12, 1949. p. 26 – via Newspapers.com.
  29. ^ Reynolds, Pain Gang, p. 65.
  30. ^ "Packers Upset Bears, Gain Top Place In Western Division". Green Bay Press-Gazette. November 3, 1941. p. 15 – via Newspapers.com.
  31. ^ "Long Live the Record of Bays' Clarke Hinkle!". Green Bay Press-Gazette. October 24, 1942. p. 12 – via Newspapers.com.
  32. ^ Cain, Charles (October 4, 1949). "Steve Van Buren Mr. Football as Eagles Tip Lions". The Owosso Argus-Press. Associated Press. p. 8. Retrieved July 18, 2016.
  33. ^ "Jim Thorpe, Sam Baugh Named To Gridiron's Hall of Fame". Evening Times, Cumberland, MD. August 3, 1950. p. 17 – via Newspapers.com.
  34. ^ "All-Time Packer Team". Green Bay Press-Gazette. September 27, 1957. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com.
  35. ^ "Hinkle, Michalske Elected to Hall of Fame". Green Bay Press-Gazette. February 28, 1964. p. 13 – via Newspapers.com.
  36. ^ "All-1930's NFL Team Selected". The Baltimore Sun. August 27, 1969. p. C5.
  37. ^ "New Packer 'Famers' Look Back At the Titles That Slipped Away". Green Bay Press-Gazette. January 30, 1972. p. C3 – via Newspapers.com.
  38. ^ "W. Clarke Hinkle". Bucknell University. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  39. ^ Toronto High School Alumni Association News Letter (Winter 1995). "Knight Times" (PDF).
  40. ^ 2001 NFL Record and Fact Book, Edited by Randall Liu, p. 402, Workman Publishing, 2001, ISBN 0-7611-2480-2
  41. ^ "Clarke Hinkle". Green Bay Packers. Retrieved October 23, 2017.
  42. ^ "Star Packer Back Marries". Chicago Tribune. December 11, 1936. p. 34.
  43. ^ a b Quoted in Myron Cope, The Game That Was. New York: World Publishing Co., 1970; pg. 97.
  44. ^ "Hinkle Is Lieutenant In U.S. Coast Guard". Green Bay Press-Gazette. May 23, 1942. p. 11 – via Newspapers.com.
  45. ^ "Hinkle Praised". Green Bay Press-Gazette. January 4, 1943. p. 11 – via Newspapers.com.
  46. ^ a b c "Hinkle Finds Things Tough in Civilian Circles". Green Bay Press-Gazette. May 29, 1946. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com.
  47. ^ a b "Packers great Hinkle dies at 79". Green Bay Press-Gazette. November 10, 1988. pp. C1, C8.
  48. ^ "Famed Fullback Clarke Hinkle On Channel Nine". The Daily Times. June 10, 1967. p. 9 – via Newspapers.com.

Further reading

  • Myron Cope, The Game That Was: The Early Days of Pro Football. New York: World Publishing Co., 1970. —Extensive interview, chapter 7.

External links

Records
Preceded by
Cliff Battles
NFL career rushing yards leader
1941 – 1949
Succeeded by
Steve Van Buren
1932 All-Pro Team

The 1932 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1932 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, seven of the eight NFL coaches for the Associated Press (AP), the United Press, and Collyer's Eye (CE).Five players were selected for the first team by all three selectors: Portsmouth Spartans quarterback Dutch Clark; Chicago Bears fullback Bronko Nagurski; New York Giants end Ray Flaherty; Green Bay Packers tackle Cal Hubbard; and Chicago Bears guard Zuck Carlson.

1937 All-Pro Team

The 1937 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1937 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the NFL coaches (NFL), the International News Service (INS), the United Press (UP), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).Four players were selected for the first team by all five selectors: Detroit Lions quarterback Dutch Clark; Green Bay Packers fullback Clarke Hinkle; Washington Redskins tackle Turk Edwards; and Chicago Bears guard George Musso. Three others were named to the first team by four selectors: Washington Redskins Sammy Baugh (NFL, INS, UP, NYDN; selected as a halfback); Chicago Cardinals end Gaynell Tinsley (NFL, UP, CE, NYDN); and Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar (NFL, UP, CE, NYDN). Three more were selected by three selectors: Washington Redskins halfback Cliff Battles (NFL, INS, NYDN); Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson (INS, CE, NYDN); and New York Giants center Mel Hein (NFL, INS, NYDN).

1938 All-Pro Team

The 1938 All-Pro Team consisted of American football players chosen by various selectors for the All-Pro team of the National Football League (NFL) for the 1938 NFL season. Teams were selected by, among others, the National Professional Football Writers Association (PFW), the United Press (UP), the International News Service (INS), Collyer's Eye (CE), and the New York Daily News (NYDN).Players displayed in bold were consensus first-team selections. Four players were selected for the first team by all five selectors: New York Giants halfback Ed Danowski; Green Bay Packers fullback Clarke Hinkle; New York Giants tackle Ed Widseth; and Chicago Bears guard Dan Fortmann. Another two were selected for the first team by four selectors: Brooklyn Dodgers quarterback Ace Parker (PFW, UP, INS, NYDN); Pittsburgh Pirates halfback Byron White (PFW, UP, INS, CE); and Green Bay Packers end Don Hutson (PFW, UP, INS, NYDN). Five players were selected for the first team by three selectors: Chicago Cardinals end Gaynell Tinsley (PFW, INS, CE); Philadelphia Eagles end Bill Hewitt (UP, CE, NYDN); Chicago Bears tackle Joe Stydahar (UP, INS, NYDN); Green Bay Packers guard Russ Letlow (PFW, INS, CE); and New York Giants center Mel Hein (UP, INS, NYDN).

1939 Green Bay Packers season

The 1939 Green Bay Packers season was their 21st season overall and their 19th season in the National Football League. The club posted a 9–2 record under coach Curly Lambeau, earning a first-place finish in the Western Conference. The Packers ended the season by beating the New York Giants in the NFL Championship Game 27–0, earning the Packers their fifth NFL Championship and the first title game shutout ever recorded.

2012–13 Butler Bulldogs men's basketball team

The 2012–13 Butler Bulldogs men's basketball team represented Butler University in the 2012–13 NCAA Division I men's basketball season. Their head coach was Brad Stevens, serving his 6th year. The Bulldogs played their home games at Hinkle Fieldhouse, which has a capacity of approximately 10,000. This was the first year that Butler competed in the Atlantic 10 Conference, as they moved from the Horizon League following the 2011–12 season. The Bulldogs returned all but three players, including Chase Stigall, who was a part-time starter in 2011-2012, and Roosevelt Jones, who "was a top flight recruit and did not disappoint [with] 7.8 points and a team high 6.0 rebounds last season."They finished the season 27–9, 11–5 in A-10 play to finish in a three way tie for third place. They advanced to the semifinals of the Atlantic 10 Tournament where they lost to Saint Louis. They received an at-large bid to the 2013 NCAA Tournament where they defeated Bucknell in the second round before losing in the third round to Marquette.

2012–13 was Butler's first and only season in the Atlantic 10 as they joined the so-called Catholic 7, along with Creighton and Xavier, in the new incarnation of the Big East Conference in July 2013.

Bob Monnett

Robert C. Monnett (February 27, 1910 – August 2, 1978) was a professional American football player who played halfback for six seasons for the Green Bay Packers. He was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973.

Bucknell Bison football

The Bucknell Bison football team represents Bucknell University in college football at the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA) level. Bucknell is a member of the Patriot League. Bucknell won the first Orange Bowl, 26–0, over the Miami Hurricanes on January 1, 1935.

Charley Brock

Charles Jacob "Charley" Brock (March 15, 1916 – May 25, 1987) was an American football center and linebacker.

Clarke (given name)

Clarke is a given name. Notable people with the name include:

Clarke Abel (c. 1789–1826), British surgeon and naturalist

Clarke Carlisle (born 1979), English footballer

Clarke Dermody (born 1980), New Zealand rugby union footballer

Clarke Fraser (1920–2014), Canadian medical geneticist

Clarke Hinkle (1909-1988), American National Football League player

Clarke Hogan (born 1969), American politician

Clarke Lewis (1840–1896), United States Representative from Mississippi

Clarke MacArthur (born 1985), Canadian National Hockey League player

Clarke Peters (born 1952), American actor, singer, writer and director

Clarke Reed (born 1928), American politician

Clarke Scholes (1930-2010), American swimmer and Olympic gold medalist

Clarke Wilm (born 1976), Canadian hockey player

Clarke Hinkle Field

Clarke Hinkle Field is one of the two outdoor American football practice facilities of the Green Bay Packers (the other being Ray Nitschke Field). These fields, together with the Don Hutson Center, comprise the team's training complex.

The field is named for Clarke Hinkle, who played for the Packers from 1932 to 1941. Hinkle is a member of both the Pro Football and Packers halls of fame. The field itself has been in use by the team since 1958, and was named for the former player in 1997.Clarke Hinkle Field has a sand-based natural turf surface, installed in 2005. The natural grass surface is reinforced with artificial fibers using the Desso GrassMaster system. It was installed at Clarke Hinkle Field as a test for the turf problems that plagued Lambeau Field in the later months of the season which proved successful, as Lambeau Field itself was sodded with the Desso GrassMaster system in 2007. The nearby outdoor Ray Nitschke Field has an artificial FieldTurf surface, allowing the team to practice on surfaces used by the majority of NFL teams.

Don Hutson Center

The Don Hutson Center is the indoor practice facility of the Green Bay Packers. Located across the street from Lambeau Field, it was built in 1994 at a cost of $4.7 million.

The center is named after Don Hutson, who played for the Packers from 1935 to 1945. A member of both the Pro Football and Packers Halls of Fame, Hutson was the dominant player of his era, setting records that stood for 50 years after his retirement.

The Don Hutson Center is the largest element of the Packers' practice complex, which includes Ray Nitschke Field and Clarke Hinkle Field, which were also named after Packer greats.

There are two practice fields inside the Center: a 70-yard (64 m) field runs east-west, with another 60-yard (55 m) field running north-south, allowing the offense and defense to practice simultaneously. With 90-foot (27 m) and 85-foot (26 m) high ceilings over the respective fields, the facility allows the special teams to run full punting and kicking practices. The FieldTurf surfaces allow the Packers to replicate game conditions for road games where they will have to play indoors or on artificial surfaces.

The Packers' video department has elevated camera positions on the inside of the Hutson Center for filming practices, as well as four porches on the exterior of the west side for filming practices at Clarke Hinkle Field.

The Center was dedicated on July 18, 1994, at a ceremony presided over by the then 81-year-old Hutson himself.

Gerry Ellis

Gerry Ellis (born November 12, 1957

in Columbia, Missouri) is a former professional American football player who played running back for seven seasons for the Green Bay Packers.

Gordie Hinkle

Daniel Gordon Hinkle (April 3, 1905 – March 19, 1972) was an American professional baseball player, coach and manager. Born in Toronto, Ohio, he saw service in Major League Baseball as a backup catcher for the 1934 Boston Red Sox and as a coach for the 1939 Detroit Tigers. Listed at 6 feet (1.8 m) tall and 185 pounds (84 kg), Hinkle batted and threw right-handed.

Hinkle had a ten-season playing career, beginning in 1930 in the St. Louis Cardinals' farm system. The Red Sox acquired him in December 1933 and used him in 27 games to spell regular catcher Rick Ferrell, a future member of the Baseball Hall of Fame. In his one-season MLB career, Hinkle was a .173 hitter (13 hits in 75 at bats) with nine RBI, including seven runs scored, six doubles and one triple. He did not hit a home run. In 26 catching appearances, he posted a .992 fielding percentage, committing one error in 119 chances.

Hinkle returned to minor league baseball in 1935 and, apart from spending 1939 as the Tigers' bullpen coach, he spent the remainder of his baseball career in the minors as a player and manager, through 1948. He died in Houston, Texas, at age 66.

His younger brother Clarke Hinkle set the NFL career rushing record and was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1964.

Green Bay Packers records

This article details statistics relating to the Green Bay Packers.

Hank Bruder

Henry George "Hank" Bruder Jr. (November 22, 1907 – June 29, 1970) was an American football player in the National Football League. He played nine years with the Green Bay Packers from 1931 to 1939 and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1972. Bruder attended Northwestern University, where he was a member of the Delta Upsilon Fraternity.He was part of the offensive line that blocked for Pro Football Hall of Fame back Johnny "Blood" McNally.

List of Green Bay Packers players

The following is a list of notable past or present players of the Green Bay Packers professional American football team.

Ray Nitschke Field

Ray Nitschke Field is one of the two outdoor practice facilities of the Green Bay Packers (the other is Clarke Hinkle Field). These fields, together with the Don Hutson Center, comprise the team's training complex.

The field is named for Ray Nitschke, who played for the Packers from 1958 to 1972 and whose number 66 was retired by the team. Nitschke is a member of both the Pro Football and Packers Hall of Fames.

On June 18, 2003, the Brown County Board voted 23–0 to approve a new lease for Ray Nitschke Field which gave the Packers the use of the site through 2020. The lease began in 2004 and started at $125,000 with an increase of $5,000 in each succeeding year. The Packers had been leasing the field from the County since 1997 for $15,000 a year. This field had an artificial FieldTurf surface, installed in 2004 (Clarke Hinkle Field has a natural grass surface).

The Packers have since signed a 15-year lease with Brown County to move the field closer to the Don Hutson Center, with their paying $200,000 to the county this year and increasing $6,500 each subsequent year. The new location is in a former parking lot for the Resch Center and as part of the deal the Packers had to build a 205-space parking lot at the former site of Nitschke Field.

On August 1, 2009, the Packers unveiled major renovations to the practice facility, including bleacher seating for 1500 fans, a sound system for announcements and music as well as natural grass field with underground heating. The heating system will enable the team to host outdoor practices in the winter, something they have been unable to do in the past. The exterior facade uses the same brick style as Lambeau Field and the 170 × 75-yard field is considered a state-of-the-art practice field unlike anything else in the National Football League.

Tom Hanson (American football)

Thomas Tucker "Swede" Hanson (November 10, 1907 – August 5, 1970) was an American football halfback in the National Football League mainly for the Philadelphia Eagles, for whom he caught the first touchdown in franchise history. He played college football at Temple University.

Born and raised in the Navesink section of Middletown Township, New Jersey, Hanson attended Leonardo High School (which currently is known as Middletown High School North), where he started playing varsity level high school athletics while he was in the seventh grade; he would also play both baseball and basketball in high school. As a sophomore in the 1925 season, Hanson led Leonardo High School to the school's first state championship, finishing the regular season with an 8-0 record, until they lost the postseason Class B playoff championship game by a score of 20-0 played in front of 3,000 fans at Rutgers University against a Rahway High School team that had been undefeated for three consecutive seasons. As a junior in 1926, Hanson was part of the Leonardo team that won its second consecutive state title, with wins that included a 40-0 victory against Rahway that ended the school's win streak.At Temple University, Hanson scored the winning touchdown on a 76-yard punt return to lead the team to a 7-6 victory against heavily favored Bucknell College, tackling future Hall-of-Famer Clarke Hinkle late in the game to preserve the win. Hanson scored 80 points as a running back for the Owls during the 1927 season, including four touchdowns and four extra points he scored in a single game that Temple won by a score of 110-0 against Blue Ridge College; Temple led Blue Ridge by a score of 78-0 at halftime and loaned three players to the losing side during the second half, when quarters were shortened to five minutes. Hanson also competed in intercollegiate boxing at Temple.Hanson went professional in 1931, playing for the Brooklyn Dodgers, before moving over to the Staten Island Stapletons for the next season. Bert Bell took over the bankrupt Stapletons and relocated the franchise to Philadelphia in 1933. On October 29, 1933, Hanson scored the first touchdown in Eagles franchise history in Green Bay against the Packers on a 35-yard pass from Roger Randolph "Red" Kirkman. Hanson led the Eagles in rushing during the 1933-1936 seasons and finished second in the league in 1934 to Beattie Feathers. Traded to the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1938, he was a teammate of Byron White, who woul later serve as an Associate Justice on the United States Supreme Court.After leaving football, he worked as a mechanic at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. Hanson died in Philadelphia at the age of 62 at Einstein Medical Center and was survived by his wife, Delores.

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two-way players
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