Civil and Military Gazette

The Civil and Military Gazette was a daily English language newspaper founded in 1872 in British India. It was published from Lahore, Simla and Karachi, some times simultaneously, until its closure in 1963.[1]

The Civil and Military Gazette
TypeDaily newspaper
PublisherE.A. Smedley
Founded1872
LanguageEnglish
Ceased publicationAugust 31, 1963
HeadquartersLahore, British India (later Pakistan)

History

The Civil and Military Gazette
(Lahore)
TypeDaily newspaper
Editor
Associate editorRudyard Kipling (1882-1887)
Founded1872
LanguageEnglish
Ceased publicationSeptember 13, 1963
HeadquartersLahore, British India (later Pakistan)
The Civil and Military Gazette
(Simla)
TypeDaily newspaper
Founded1872
LanguageEnglish
Ceased publicationFebruary 12, 1949
HeadquartersSimla, British India (later India)
The Civil and Military Gazette
(Karachi)
TypeDaily newspaper
FoundedFebruary 3, 1949
LanguageEnglish
Ceased publicationMarch 31, 1953
HeadquartersKarachi, British India (later Pakistan)

The Civil and Military Gazette was founded in Lahore and Simla in 1872. It was a merger of The Mofussilite in Calcutta, and the Lahore Chonicle and Indian Public Opinion and Panjab Times in Lahore.[1][2]

The Lahore and Simla editions of the paper continued to be published concurrently until 1949, when the Simla branch was closed.

The Civil and Military Gazette began publishing in Karachi a week before its branch in Simla closed. However, the CMG in Karachi was very short lived, the publication lasting a mere 4 years.

During the CMG's publication in Lahore, Simla, and Karachi, the frequency of publication changed thrice as follows:

Date changed Until Frequency of Publication Branches affected
January 2, 1929 November 14, 1932 Daily (except Tuesday) Lahore, Simla
November 15, 1932 December 27, 1932 Daily Lahore, Simla
June 1, 1945 October 24, 1949 Daily (except Monday) Lahore, Karachi

Notable staff members

Rudyard Kipling

The Civil and Military Gazette was the workplace of renowned British author and poet, Rudyard Kipling. It was referred to by Kipling as his "mistress and most true love."[3]

Kipling was assistant editor of the CMG, a job procured for him by his father, who was curator of the Lahore Museum,[4] when it was decided that he lacked the academic ability to get into Oxford University on a scholarship.[5]

When Kipling joined the staff at the Lahore CMG in 1882, the editor-in-chief was Stephen Wheeler. 1886 brought a change of editors at the newspaper. Kay Robinson, the new editor, allowed more creative freedom and Kipling was asked to contribute short stories to the newspaper.[6] His first collection of short stories, Plain Tales from the Hills, contained 28 stories that had initially found publication in the CMG.[7]

Rudyard Kipling eventually left the Civil and Military Gazette in 1887, to move to its sister-newspaper in Allahabad, The Pioneer.[4]

Mahbub Jamal Zahedi

The last editor of CMG was Abdul Hamid Sheikh, who wrote Lahore Notes under 'HS' in the Pakistan Times after the CMG shut down. Mahbub Jamal Zahedi joined the Civil and Military Gazette in 1963, at a time when its last branch, situated in Lahore, was about to cease publication. He served there for only a few months, before he moved to Dawn in Karachi.[8]

References

  1. ^ a b Asiamap: Archives, Retrieved September 10, 2010.
  2. ^ Indian English through newspapers: By Asima Ranjan Parhi, Retrieved September 11, 2010.
  3. ^ Kipling, Rudyard (1935). "Something of mysel". public domain. Archived from the original on February 23, 2014. Retrieved September 6, 2008.also: 1935/1990. Something of myself and other autobiographical writings. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-40584-X.
  4. ^ a b Vicyorianweb.Org: Ruyard Kipling Chronology, Retrieved September 11, 2010.
  5. ^ Carpenter, Henry and Mari Prichard. 1984. Oxford Companion to Children's Literature. pp. 296–297. ISBN 0-19-860228-6
  6. ^ Rutherford, Andrew (1987). Introduction to the Oxford World's Classics edition of "Plain Tales from the Hills", by Rudyard Kipling. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-281652-7
  7. ^ Carpenter, H. and M. Prichard. 1984. The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature, Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York. ISBN 0-19-860228-6
  8. ^ "MJ Zahedi no more". The Daily Star. December 26, 2008. Archived from the original on December 4, 2014. Retrieved September 11, 2010.
A Germ-Destroyer

"A Germ-Destroyer" is a short story by Rudyard Kipling. It was first published in the Civil and Military Gazette on May 17, 1887, in the first Indian edition of Plain Tales from the Hills in 1888, and in subsequent editions of that collection. The story is one of Kipling's essays into farcical humour – with his frequent sardonic glances at the oddities of the way that the world works: here, the administrative world of the British Raj. He tells of the new Viceroy who has arrived with a Private Secretary called Wonder, who is trying to run the Indian Empire. ("All Simla agreed that there was 'too much Wonder and too little Viceroy in that rule.'")

The farce of the story begins with the coincidence of two men who want to speak to the Viceroy. There is a monomaniac inventor called Mellish, who has little hope of an audience; and Mellishe, of Madras, who is rich, grandiloquent and important, and has the 'perquisite' of 'conferring with the Viceroy'. They are both staying at the same hotel, and Wonder's invitation to a private lunch with the Viceroy is delivered to the inventor, rather than, as intended, the rich man. The Viceroy is charmed by his guest, who doesn't 'talk shop' till they smoke after lunch. Then Mellish, the Inventor, discourses on cholera, his theory, the 'conspiracy' against him of the medical establishment and so on, until he tips a sample of his patent Fumigatory powder into an ash-tray and lights it. The result is a "most pungent and sickening stench" which fills the entire Viceregal residence. (This is an example of Kipling's schoolboy sense of humour: he was after all only 21 when he wrote this story.) Mellish boasts that "'not a germ could live.'" The residence panics, until "an Aide-de-Camp, who desired the V.C. [more schoolboy humour] rushed through the rolling clouds and hauled Mellish into the hall." The Viceroy, "prostrate with laughter", repeats "'Not a germ, as you say, could rightly exist! I can swear it. A magnificent success!'"

Wonder arrives and is shocked by the scene. But it becomes a splendid anecdote for the Viceroy, and he uses it to get rid of Wonder (his own plague, or 'germ') by saying, in the latter's hearing, "'And I really thought ... that my dear good Wonder had hired an assassin to clear his way to the throne!'". Whereupon Wonder resigns (on health grounds) – the ending, too, may perhaps be thought of as rather adolescent.

All quotations in this article have been taken from the Uniform Edition of Plain Tales from the Hills published by Macmillan & Co., Limited in London in 1899. The text is that of the third edition (1890), and the author of the article has used his own copy of the 1923 reprint. Further comment, including page-by-page notes, can be found on the Kipling Society's website.

Consequences (Kipling story)

"Consequences" is the title of a short story by Rudyard Kipling, first published in the Civil and Military Gazette on December 9, 1886; and first in book form in the first Indian edition of Plain Tales from the Hills (1888), and in subsequent editions of that collection.

The story is an illustration of the power of Mrs Hauksbee. (It is Kipling's third story about her in book form.) Tarrion, a "clever and amusing" young officer in an unfashionable regiment, longs for a permanent appointment in Simla. There he has the good fortune to do Mrs Hauksbee a favour (by forging a date on her invitation, so that she can attend the more prestigious Ball, rather than the smaller "dance" to which she has been sent an invitation by the Governor's A.-D.-C. with whom she has quarrelled). So she owes Tarrion a favour, and asks what she can do. He admits that "I haven't a square inch of interest here in Simla" - but says that he wants a permanent post in that most desirable Hill Station. She agrees to help him.

Now by chance (an ill-written address, and a stupid orderly) she comes into possession of some official papers. These she reads with Tarrion, and he uses them to persuade "the biggest and strongest man that the Government owned" to give him a permanent post. It is not particularly well-paid, but it is finally granted because the Viceroy has an obsession with 'Diplomatic secrecy', and believes that "a boy so well supplied with information would be worth" promoting.

At the end, Tarrion thinks "'If Mrs Hauksbee were twenty years younger, and I her husband, I should be Viceroy of India in fifteen years.'" Mrs Hauksbee thinks "'What fools men are!'"

All quotations in this article have been taken from the Uniform Edition of Plain Tales from the Hills published by Macmillan & Co., Limited in London in 1899. The text is that of the third edition (1890), and the author of the article has used his own copy of the 1923 reprint. Further comment, including these page-by-page notes are on the Kipling Society's website.

His Wedded Wife

"His Wedded Wife" by Rudyard Kipling was published in the Civil and Military Gazette on February 25, 1887, and in book form in the first Indian edition of Plain Tales from the Hills in 1888, and in subsequent editions of that collection. It is one of the short stories that Tompkins classifies as a tale of 'revenge', but it has elements of those classified as 'farce'.

In the House of Suddhoo

"In the House of Suddhoo" is a short story by Rudyard Kipling. The story was published in the Civil and Military Gazette on April 30, 1886 under the title "Section 420, I.P.C." (Indian Penal Code). (Section 420 of the Indian Penal Code of 1860 lays down that anyone who cheats and dishonestly induces a person to hand over any valuable property shall be punished with imprisonment and a fine.) Its first appearance in book form was in the first Indian edition of Plain Tales from the Hills in 1888. It was the third of the stories that appear in that collection to be written "In the House of Suddhoo", therefore, is a story about deception. There are several layers of uncertainty in it. Suddhoo is a "very, very old" man who lets rooms in his house. The inhabitants are: on the ground floor, Bhagwan Dass, the grocer, and a man who claims to be a seal-cutter, together with their households; on the upper floor, Janoo (and formerly Azizun, who has now married and left), "Ladies of the City, and theirs was an ancient and more or less honourable profession" (that is, prostitutes). Here is one layer of questionable honesty - although Kipling is at pains to show Janoo as honest and intelligent. The narrator is in favour with Suddhoo, because he, a Sahib or Briton has got a job for one of Suddhoo's cousins. "Suddhoo says that God will make me a Lieutenant-Governor one of these days. [Another layer of dishonesty - or humour?] I daresay his prophecy will come true. [Again]"

Suddhoo is very fond of his son, who lives at Peshawar, some 400 miles away. The young man contracts pleurisy. The seal-cutter, who understands the telegraph as Suddhoo cannot, has a friend in Peshawar who sends him the details before letters arrive. Suddhoo is worried at his son's health and invites the narrator to discuss it - specifically the prohibition on jadoo, or magic, by the Raj. The narrator reassures him that white magic is permitted, and that the officials of the Raj practise it themselves - Kipling adds, with more humour, "(If the Financial Statement [roughly, the Budget of the government of India] isn't magic, I don't know what is)". Suddhoo admits that he has paid much money for the 'clean sorcery' of the seal-cutter, who gets accurate reports "more quickly than the lightning can fly".

So they approach Suddhoo's house, hearing noises from the seal-cutter's window. They climb the darkened stairs, to Janoo's room, where there is more space. Then the magician enters, stripped to the waist, and puts on a most impressive performance, face white and eyes rolled back. The narrator recognises the fire-eating and the ventriloquism, and realises that, however impressive - and frightening - the performance is, it is a fraud, as Janoo says in her own language hearing him twice claim a very precise fee. (It is, of course, the central fraud in the tale.) She is upset that Suddhoo is spending all his money, some of which she had counted on acquiring (by "wheedling", which may be accounted as another form of deception).

Kipling summarises the narrator's problems: he has aided and abetted the seal-cutter in obtaining money under false pretences, so is guilty under British law; he cannot tackle the seal-cutter, as the latter will poison Janoo; and he fears that Janoo will poison the seal-cutter anyway. making him (the narrator) guilty as accessory to the act.

So deception is manifold.

All quotations in this article have been taken from the Uniform Edition of Plain Tales from the Hills published by Macmillan & Co., Limited in London in 1899. The text is that of the third edition (1890), and the author of the article has used his own copy of the 1923 reprint. The Kipling Society's website has further comment, including notes at [1].

Khairpur, Chakwal

Khairpur(old name Khardehr) is a village and union council, an administrative subdivision, of Chakwal District in the Punjab Province of Pakistan. It is part of Kalar kahar Tehsil and is also the location of the DG Khan Cement Company, which in the fiscal year ending 30 June 2007 produced 2,387,981 metric tonnes of clinker.Now village Khairpur is a part of Kallar Kahar Tehsil. Located on the road leading to Choa Saiden Shah 10 kilometres east of Kallar Kahar motorway interchange, this village of Awan clan is an old and famous village of Kahoon valley. Apart from the headquarters of Union Council Khairpur, a high school for boys and girls and a Basic Health Unit are there. Agriculture and Army Service are the main profession of the dwellers. Though now the residents of the village are now in other government jobs like teaching, medical, business and other professions. The old name Khardare of this village was changed to Khairpur in 1947. The detail history of the village can be seen in Civil and Military Gazette of Jhelum District. As it was a part of Jhelum District and was included in Pind Dadan Khan Tehsil before 1985.

A number of veteran participated in First and second World War. A Galantry Award "Sitar-e-Jurrat" was awarded to Maj. Shah Nawaz Shaheed in 1965 Indo-Pak War. A road in Karachi was named to remember this Hero of CHumb Jorrian Sector.

Other notable personalities from this village are Col.Jahandad khan, Capt. Muhammad Khan, Engr. Najam Sultan, Journalist Malik Aftab, Malik Noor Hussain, Malik Bostan Khan, Capt.Afzal Malik.

Kidnapped (short story)

The Rudyard Kipling story "Kidnapped" was first published in the Civil and Military Gazette on March 21, 1887, in the first Indian edition of Plain Tales from the Hills (1888), and in subsequent editions of that collection.

Lispeth

"Lispeth" is a short story by Rudyard Kipling. It was first published in the Civil and Military Gazette on 29 November 1886; its first appearance in book form was in the first Indian edition of Plain Tales from the Hills in 1888, and it later appeared in subsequent editions of that collection. The tale is an interesting example of Kipling's attitudes to different races and cultures, which is less simple than many accounts of his beliefs allow.

Miss Youghal's Sais

"Miss Youghal's Sais" is a short story in Rudyard Kipling's collection Plain Tales from the Hills (1888). It is the first appearance in book form of the fictional character Strickland. (It was first published in the Civil and Military Gazette on 25 April 1887.)

Strickland, a policeman who is regarded as disreputable for his habits in going undercover disguised as a native, falls in love with Miss Youghal. Her parents do not approve, not only are "ways and works" untrustworthy, but he works in "the worst paid Department in the Empire." Her parents forbid him from speaking with or writing to their daughter. "'Very well,' said Strickland, for he did not wish to make his lady-love's life a burden." Then he takes three months leave, disappears, and is employed as her Sais, or native groom, called Dulloo. One day, towards the end of the three months, "an old and very distinguished General" takes Miss Youghal riding, and flirts with her. Strickland "stood it as long as he could. Then he caught hold of the General's bridle, and, in most fluent English, invited him to step off and be flung over the cliff." Miss Youghal explains, and the General begins to laugh. He intercedes on the behalf of the young pair to her parents, and they are married.

All quotations in the plot summary above have been taken from the Uniform Edition of Plain Tales from the Hills published by Macmillan & Co., Limited in London in 1899. The text is that of the third edition (1890), and the author of the article has used his own copy of the 1923 reprint. Further comment, including page-by-page notes, can be found on the Kipling Society's website, at [1].

Plain Tales from the Hills

Plain Tales from the Hills (published 1888) is the first collection of short stories by Rudyard Kipling. Out of its 40 stories, "eight-and-twenty", according to Kipling's Preface, were initially published in the Civil and Military Gazette in Lahore, Punjab, British India, between November 1886 and June 1887. "The remaining tales are, more or less, new." (Kipling had worked as a journalist for the CMG—his first job—since 1882, when he was not quite 17.)

The title refers, by way of a pun on "Plain" as the reverse of "Hills", to the deceptively simple narrative style; and to the fact that many of the stories are set in the Hill Station of Simla—the "summer capital of the British Raj" during the hot weather. Not all of the stories are, in fact, about life in "the Hills": Kipling gives sketches of many aspects of life in British India.

The tales include the first appearances, in book form, of Mrs. Hauksbee, the policeman Strickland, and the Soldiers Three (Privates Mulvaney, Ortheris and Learoyd).

The Arrest of Lieutenant Golightly

"The Arrest of Lieutenant Golightly" is a short story by Rudyard Kipling. It was first published in the Civil and Military Gazette on November 23 1886, in book form in the first Indian edition of Plain Tales from the Hills in 1888, and in subsequent editions of that collection. The story, published when Kipling was not quite 21 years old, is a well-crafted piece of writing about an essentially schoolboy version of schadenfreude - sheer pleasure, in this case, at seeing someone 'get his comeuppance' - with an element of slapstick.

Lieutenant Golightly is a young officer in the British Army in India who prides himself on "looking like 'an Officer and a Gentleman'". According to John McGivering, in the Notes to this story on the Kipling Society's website, Golightly is certainly an officer, but not at all certainly a gentleman. It is clear that he takes too much care over his appearance, and dresses rather too flashily, wearing, as he is, a "delicate olive-green suit" with a blue tie and a sola topee. As he hastens back from leave (having left all his money apart from loose change behind him), he is beset by misfortune: monsoon rains make him muddy and sweaty; his helmet dissolves in the rain; the dyes of its lining (purple) and his suit (green) run. He falls from his horse, which becomes so lame that he has to walk, whereon he throws away his tie, which has also run, and his (detachable) collar. He arrives at a railway station, buys a drink - and finds that he only has 6 Indian anna left. On talking to the Station Master, he is taken for a deserter, one Private Binkle, and after some temporising is arrested and carried bodily off by four native policeman. They hand him over to a detachment of the British Army, who admire his fluency in bad language, but don't believe his insistence that he is an officer. Golightly is finally saved by a Major in his own Regiment, who recognises him and has him released - then, of course, relating the story to the army. Kipling says that he may now publish the story as Golightly has "gone Home".

All quotations in this article have been taken from the Uniform Edition of Plain Tales from the Hills published by Macmillan & Co., Limited in London in 1899. The text is that of the third edition (1890), and the author of the article has used his own copy of the 1923 reprint. Further comment, including page-by-page notes, can be found on the Kipling Society's website, at http://www.kipling.org.uk/rg_golightly1.htm

The Conversion of Aurelian McGoggin

"The Conversion of Aurelian McGoggin" is a short story by Rudyard Kipling. It was first published in the Civil and Military Gazette on April 28, 1887, and first in book form in the first Indian edition of Plain Tales from the Hills in 1888, and in subsequent editions of that collection.

Aurelian McGoggin is a young man fresh out to India. He is much influenced by the ideas of Auguste Comte and Herbert Spencer. These names, along with the attitudes expressed by the narrator of the story, are sufficient to stamp McGoggin as that most undesirable type in the days of the Raj, an 'intellectual': in the story, he is mocked for his 'theories' and his "Creed". This appears mostly to consist in denying the existence of souls, and of God. (In one of Kipling's characteristically double-edged ways of looking ironically at the world he writes, after discoursing on the chain of command in British India: "If the Empress be not responsible to her Maker - if there is no Maker for her to be responsible to - the entire system of Our administration must be wrong; which is manifestly impossible.")

McGoggin becomes intolerable to the men who have been in India longer than he has. "christened him the 'Blastoderm', and throw cushions at him in the Club: His superior says that "for a clever boy, Aurelian was a very big idiot." He works well, and hard - too hard, for he suffers an attack of aphasia - a mental breakdown, which deprives him speech. The Doctor prescribes him three months rest. The experience cows McGoggin: he is frightened of what he has learnt about himself, and what he does not understand about his own mind and memory. The upshot is that "the Club had rest when he returned".

This story is one where Kipling tries to make sense of the whole Indian experience, or at least portray it to those living in the United Kingdom ("Home"), and betrays an anti-intellectual pose as the bluff common-sensical man. At the same time, he shows real sympathy for the man who "was afraid - horribly afraid".

All quotations in this article have been taken from the Uniform Edition of Plain Tales from the Hills published by Macmillan & Co., Limited in London in 1899. The text is that of the third edition (1890), and the author of the article has used his own copy of the 1923 reprint. The Kipling Society's website has further comment, including page-by-page notes.

The Other Man (short story)

"The Other Man" is a short story by the British writer Rudyard Kipling, first published in the Civil and Military Gazette on 13 November 1886, in the first Indian edition of Plain Tales from the Hills in 1888, and in subsequent editions of that collection.

The story, which is set in Simla, the Hill Station where the British used to spend their leaves during the hot weather, tells of Miss Gaurey, whom "her parents made ... marry Colonel Schreiderling ... not much more than 35 years her senior", who is a good match, if not particularly well off, and has lung-complaints which she nurses "seventeen days in each month". She had been secretly engaged to "the Other Man" ("I have forgotten his name"), who gets himself transferred away to an unhealthy Station. He also has bad health: intermittent fever, and a bad heart valve. Mrs Schreiderling, as she now is, never weeps, but begins to contract every infection on the Station. She becomes ugly - Schreiderling says so, and returns to bachelor habits.

One August, he leaves her at Simla to return to his regiment. The narrator hears that the Other Man is coming to Simla, being very sick. Mrs Schreiderling is waiting for him at dusk on the Mall as his Tonga (carriage) draws up as the narrator is passing - and then she screams. The long journey has killed the Other Man. The narrator sorts out the details, ensuring the confidentiality of the Tonga driver, and takes Mrs Schreiderling home.

"She did not die - men of Schreiderling's stamp marry women who don't die easily. They live and grow ugly." Two years later, she goes Home; and dies.

All quotations in this article have been taken from the Uniform Edition of Plain Tales from the Hills published by Macmillan & Co., Limited in London in 1899. The text is that of the third edition (1890), and the author of the article has used his own copy of the 1923 reprint.

The Pioneer (India)

The Pioneer is an English language daily newspaper in India.

It is published from multiple locations in India, including Delhi. It is the second oldest English language newspaper in India still in circulation after The Times of India. In 2010, The Pioneer launched a Hindi version in Lucknow.

The Rescue of Pluffles

"The Rescue of Pluffles" is a short story by Rudyard Kipling. Its first appearance in book form was in Kipling's first collection of short stories, Plain Tales from the Hills (1888); it was first published in the Civil and Military Gazette on November 20, 1886. It centres on Mrs Hauksbee, and begins

Mrs. Hauksbee was sometimes nice to her own sex. Here is a story to prove this; and you can believe just as much as ever you please.

(It is necessary to say how Mrs. Hauksbee can be 'nice', after the story "Three and - an Extra" which introduced her to Kipling's readers as a woman predatory on another's husband.)

In The Rescue of Pluffles, Pluffles is a subaltern (2nd Lieutenant) in a regiment known (for a concealing nickname) 'The Unmentionables'. He is callow, and 'trusts his own judgement': and, at 24, becomes "bound hand and foot to Mrs. Reiver's 'rickshaw wheels" - that is a hyperbolic way of saying that she dominates him so that he is at her whim. Mrs. Hauksbee and Mrs. Reiver hate each other "fervently." Mrs. Hauksbee learns that Pluffles has left a fiancée at home in England. She fights Mrs. Reiver in "the Seven Weeks' War", and finally wins by talking to him "after the manner of a mother". Pluffles and his fiancée are married. He leaves the army and returns to lead a happy life farming in England. "He would have come to extreme grief in India".

The story's last paragraph:

For these reasons, if anyone says anything more than usually nasty about Mrs. Hauksbee, tell him the story of the Rescue of Pluffles.

All quotations in this article have been taken from the Uniform Edition of Plain Tales from the Hills published by Macmillan & Co., Limited in London in 1899. The text is that of the third edition (1890), and the author of the article has used his own copy of the 1923 reprint. Further comment, including page-by-page notes, can be found on the Kipling Society's website, at [1].

The Taking of Lungtungpen

"The Taking of Lungtungpen" is a short story by Rudyard Kipling which was first published in the Civil and Military Gazette on 11 April 1887. In book form, the story appeared in the first Indian edition of Plain Tales from the Hills in 1888, and in subsequent editions of that collection.

The Three Musketeers (short story)

"The Three Musketeers" is a short story by Rudyard Kipling which introduces three fictional British soldiers serving in India in the later nineteenth century: the privates Learoyd, Mulvaney and Ortheris. These characters appear in many early Kipling stories. "The Three Musketeers" was first published in the Civil and Military Gazette on 11 March 1887. It appeared in book form in Plain Tales from the Hills (1888).

Narrated by the three privates—mostly Mulvaney, the loquacious Irishman, and Ortheris —The Three Musketeers tells the story of how the three contrive not only to 'protest' (like the junior officers) against a proposed special parade requested by a visiting grandee, Lord Benira Trigg, but to have it cancelled and humiliate the Lord and receive a five-pound note apiece from him, for being "a honour to the British Harmy".Trigg is a distinguished tourist, a peer on a 'fact-finding mission' (as we might now say) to write a book. "His particular vice—because he was a Radical, men said - was having garrisons turned out for his inspection ... He turned out troops once too often"—he asked for an inspection "On - a - Thursday" (the horror is that Thursday is understood to be the troops 'make and mend' day, or half day holiday). Learoyd raises a subscription from the troops to have it cancelled, which is spent on suborning a ekka driver to take Trigg to Padsahi jhil, a large swampy tract of flooded land, about two miles off. They improve the operation by paying Buldoo, a "knowin' little divil" attached to the Artillery, to take the place of the ekka driver, and to mount a simulated abduction. Once the ekka is capsized into the jhil and Buldoo's three accomplices are banging sticks all over it, Learoyd, Mulvaney and Ortheris 'rescue' the Lord from "about forty" dacoits". He has to recover the next day in hospital, so the parade is cancelled. Trigg is grateful to The Three Musketeers (to the tune of three fivers), and the Colonel of the regiment is suspicious: but Mulvaney believes he would not have charged them with it had he known, as the cancellation of the Parade is welcome to all members of the regiment.

Three and – an Extra

"Three and – an Extra" is the earliest appearance in Kipling's books of the character Mrs. Hauksbee. It was first published in the Civil and Military Gazette on November 17, 1886, and first in book form in Plain Tales from the Hills, in 1888. It reports a defeat of "the clever, witty, brilliant and sparkling" Mrs. Hauksbee by Mrs. Cusack-Bremmil - in the former's predatory pursuit of Mr. Cusack-Bremmil.

Three years after the Cusack-Bremmils' marriage, Mrs. Bremmil is grieving for the death of their baby. "Perhaps Bremmil ought to have comforted her", but although he tries, he does not succeed. Instead, he becomes attached to Mrs. Hauksbee, causing gossip. The Bremmils are invited to a Ball given by Lord Lytton, the Viceroy: she says she will stay at home, and he takes Mrs. Hauksbee. However Mrs. Bremmil goes on her own, with a magnificent gown, and reawakens his affection: they leave together, early.

"Then said Mrs. Hauksbee to me - she looked a trifle faded and jaded in the lamplight - 'Take my word for it, the silliest woman can manage a clever man; but it needs a very clever woman to manage a fool.'

Then we went in to supper."

All quotations in this article have been taken from the Uniform Edition of Plain Tales from the Hills published by Macmillan & Co., Limited in London in 1899. The text is that of the third edition (1890), and the author of the article has used his own copy of the 1923 reprint. Further comment, including page-by-page notes, can be found on the Kipling Society's website, at [1]

Watches of the Night

"Watches of the Night" is a short story by Rudyard Kipling. It was first published in the Civil and Military Gazette on March 25, 1887; in book form, first in the first Indian edition of Plain Tales from the Hills in 1888; and in the many subsequent editions of that collection. It is one of the "Tales" which deals with the tense, enclosed society of the British in India, and the levels of gossip and malice that could be engendered therein.

"Watches of the Night," like many of Kipling's works, has a punning, allusive title. The phrase 'watches of the night' has been used since at least the Book of Common Prayer (1662), and dates back further: "the watches of the night: the night-time; watch originally each of the three or four periods of time, during which a watch or guard was kept, into which the night was divided by the Jews and Romans". The phrase occurs in the King James Bible (Psalms), and has also been used in several works of literature as a cliché for what is also called 'the wee small hours', or 'the early morning', often with connotations of blackness (both of night and of the spirits) and depression (e. g. Longfellow wrote in The Cross of Snow (1879) "In the long, sleepless watches of the night"). Kipling uses this, along with a pun on the word 'watches': the story turns on two identical timepieces.

Both the Colonel, commanding the regiment, and a Subaltern in the Regiment, Platte, a poor man, own Waterbury watches. (These are fob or Pocket watches, not wrist watches: Each usually hangs from a chain.) The Waterbury (from the town of Waterbury, Connecticut is a mass-produced and not especially prestigious make. The Colonel, who affects to be "a horsey man" (but is not) wears his watch, not on a chain, but on a leather strap made from the lip-strap of a horse's harness; Platte wears his from a leather guard, presumably because he can afford no better. One night the two men change - in a hurry - at the Club, and, not unnaturally, take each other's watch. They go on their separate ways. Later that night, as Platte returns home, his horse rears and upsets his cart, throwing him to the ground outside Mrs Larkyn's house, where his watch falls loose. The Colonel loses his watch, which slips on to the floor - where a native bearer finds it (and keeps it). Going home in a hired carriage, the Colonel finds the driver drunk, and returns late. His wife, who is religious (and, we have been told "manufactured the Station scandal"), is disinclined to believe him.

In the morning, Mrs Larkyn, who has been a victim of the Colonel's wife scandal-mongering, finds the watch that Platte has dropped, and shows it to him. He affects to believe it is "...disgusting! Shocking old man!". They send the Colonel's watch (which is the one Platte had been wearing) to the Colonel's wife. She attacks the Colonel, being wholly convinced of Original Sin - and begins to realise the harm and pain that unfounded suspicion can cause - and has caused her victims.

That is really the moral of the story. "The mistrust and the tragedy of it," says Kipling, "are killing the Colonel's Wife, and are making the Colonel wretched.

All quotations in this article have been taken from the Uniform Edition of Plain Tales from the Hills published by Macmillan & Co., Limited in London in 1899. The text is that of the third edition (1890), and the author of the article has used his own copy of the 1923 reprint. Further comment, including page-by-page notes, can be found on the Kipling Society's website, at http://www.kipling.org.uk/rg_watches1.htm.

Yoked with an Unbeliever

"Yoked with an Unbeliever" is a short story by Rudyard Kipling. It was first published in the Civil and Military Gazette on December 7, 1886, and in book form in the first Indian edition of Plain Tales from the Hills in 1888. It also appears in subsequent editions of that collection.

The story is one of Kipling's reflections on relations between the English settlers, representing the British Raj, and the native population. As so often, there is no clear-cut schematic version of the rights and wrongs - as Kipling himself says in the last sentence of the story, "Which is manifestly unfair."

The 'unfairness' is that a worthless man is loved by two women, for no reason apparent to outside observers. Phil Garron is an Englishman who has been sent out "to 'tea'". (This was a form of disgrace for the ruling class in Britain: those who failed, like Garron, in the home country were sometimes sent out 'to the Colonies' to try to redeem themselves.) Garron, who "was really going to reform all his slack, shiftless ways" leaves Agnes Laiter heartbroken behind him. He is a man of weak character, but he settles into decent (if not exceptional, as he believes) competence - and as he works, forgets Agnes, other than as a daydream. Her family bring pressure on her, successfully, to marry another (a 'better prospect' than Garron): she writes to Garron to tell him, saying "she would never know a happy moment all the rest of her life. Which was a true prophecy." (Kipling here shows his deft touch with at least seemingly mature psychological insight, and deft narrative detail.) Garron replies with a carefully drafted letter, which ordinary men might have called "the thoroughly mean and selfish work of a thoroughly mean and selfish man": but it makes Agnes cry; and Garron (in Kipling's ironic phrase) "felt every word he had written for at least two days and a half." He takes up shortly after with a Hill-woman called Dunmaya, the daughter of a senior soldier among the troops of the Native Army and marries her.

Agnes, now widowed, finds herself in Bombay and seeks Garron out. She finds him "very little altered, and Dunmaya was very nice to her." The shame, and unfairness, is first, that Phil, who really is not worth thinking of twice, was and is loved by Dunmaya, and more than loved by Agnes", and second, that "Dunmaya [the 'mere' native] is making a decent man of him [the 'white man']; and he will ultimately be saved from perdition by her training."

So it is clear that Kipling is neither a simple misogynist, nor a simple race supremacist.

All quotations in this article have been taken from the Uniform Edition of Plain Tales from the Hills published by Macmillan & Co., Limited in London in 1899. The text is that of the third edition (1890), and the author of the article has used his own copy of the 1923 reprint. Further comment, including page-by-page notes, can be found on the Kipling Society's website, at [1].

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