City of York Council

City of York Council is the local government authority for York, a city and unitary authority in Yorkshire, England. It is composed of 47 councillors, two or three for each of the 21 electoral wards of York. It is responsible for all local government services in the City of York, except for services provided by York's town and parish councils.

City of York Council
Whole council elected every four years
Arms of City of York Council
Logo
Type
Type
Leadership
Cllr Janet Looker, Labour
since 22 May 2019
Cllr Keith Aspden, Lib Dems
since 22 May 2019
Cllr Andy D’Agorne, Green
since 22 May 2019
Leader of the Opposition
Cllr Danny Myers, Labour
since 22 May 2019
Structure
Seats47 councillors
City of York Council composition
Political groups
Administration
     Liberal Democrats (21)
     Green (4)
Other parties
     Labour (17)
     Conservative (2)
     Independent (3)
Length of term
4 years
Elections
First past the post
Last election
2 May 2019
Next election
4 May 2023
Meeting place
Guildhall at York
The Guildhall, York
Website
www.york.gov.uk

History

Municipal borough

The ancient liberty of the City of York was replaced in 1836 by a municipal borough, with city status, as a result of the Municipal Corporations Act 1835. As a municipal borough, the York Corporation was responsible for all local government services in the City of York. The municipal borough was expanded to serve the following areas[1]:

Year Area Transferred from Transferred to
1836 The City of York - City of York (municipal borough)
1884 The parish of Holgate and part of the parishes of Clifton, Dringhouses, Gate Fulford, Heworth, and Middlethorpe

County borough

The municipal borough was replaced in 1884 by a county borough, with city status, as a result of the Municipal Corporations Act 1882. As a county borough, the York Corporation was responsible for all local government services in the City of York. When county councils were established for the East Riding, North Riding, and West Riding in 1889, as a result of the Local Government Act 1888, the City of York remained outside of their jurisdiction. The county borough was expanded and reduced in size to serve the following areas[1]:

Year Area Transferred from Transferred to
1884 The City of York City of York (municipal borough) City of York (county borough)
1893 Part of the parish of Clifton -
1934 Part of the parishes of Clifton Without, Heworth Without, Huntington, and Osbaldwick Rural District of Flaxton
1937 The parish of Middlethorpe Without and part of the parishes of Bishopthorpe and Dringhouses Without Rural District of Bishopthorpe
Part of the parishes of Acomb and Knapton Rural District of Great Ouseburn
1957 Part of the parish of Askham Bryan Rural District of Tadcaster
1968 Part of the City of York City of York (county borough) Rural District of Flaxton
1968 Part of the parish of Heslington Rural District of Derwent City of York (county borough)
Part of the parish of Clifton Without Rural District of Flaxton

Non-metropolitan district

The county borough was replaced in 1974 by a non-metropolitan district, with city status, as a result of the Local Government Act 1972. As a non-metropolitan district, York City Council was responsible for some local government services in the City of York, with others being the responsibility of North Yorkshire County Council. The non-metropolitan district served the same area as the county borough:

Year Area Transferred from Transferred to
1974 The City of York City of York (county borough) City of York (non-metropolitan district)

Unitary council

The non-metropolitan district was replaced in 1996 by a unitary council, with city status, as a result of the Local Government Act 1992. As a unitary council, City of York Council is responsible for all local government services in the City of York, except for services provided by York's town and parish councils. The unitary council serves the following areas:

Year Area Transferred from Transferred to
1996 The City of York City of York (non-metropolitan district) City of York (unitary council)
The parishes of Hessay, Nether Poppleton, Rufforth, and Upper Poppleton Borough of Harrogate
The parishes of Clifton Without, Earswick, Haxby, Heworth Without, Holtby, Huntington, Murton, New Earswick, Osbaldwick, Rawcliffe, Skelton, Stockton-on-the-Forest, Strensall, Towthorpe, and Wigginton District of Ryedale
The parishes of Acaster Malbis, Askham Bryan, Askham Richard, Bishopthorpe, Copmanthorpe, Deighton, Dunnington, Elvington, Fulford, Heslington, Kexby, Naburn, and Wheldrake District of Selby

Political control

Since 1995 political control of the council has been held by the following parties:[2]

Party in control Years Council leader
Labour 1995 – 2003 Cllr Rodney Hills, Cllr David Merrett
Liberal Democrats 2003 – 2007 Cllr Steven Galloway
No overall control 2007 – 2011 Cllr Andrew Waller
Labour 2011 – 2015 Cllr James Alexander, Cllr Dafydd Williams
No overall control 2015 – 2019 Cllr Chris Steward, Cllr David Carr, Cllr Ian Gillies, Cllr Keith Aspden
No overall control 2019 - present Cllr Keith Aspden

2015-2019

Conservatives and Liberal Democrats 26 of the 47 seats formed a joint administration to run the council in May 2015. Both parties are opposed to green belt development on the scale proposed by the Labour Party.[3] The working majority of the joint administration shrunk in February 2018 to 24 seats, when former council leader Cllr David Carr (Copmanthorpe Ward) and Cllr Suzie Mercer (Wheldrake Ward) quit the Conservative group and party,[4] Labour councillors Fiona Derbyshire and Hilary Shepherd resigned from the Labour Party in August to sit as Independent Socialists York.[5]

City of York Council 2017
Map showing the makeup of York City Council as of 10 November 2017

2019-present

Due to no overall control, the Liberal Democrats and the Green Party 26 of the 47 seats joined forces to form a coalition to run the City of York Council, revealed by YorkMix on 14 May 2019. Support for the Liberal Democrats and Green Party in York increased at the poll. Both parties combined received more than 50% of the vote. Furthermore, the two parties are opposed to Brexit.[6]

City of York Council election 2019 map
Map showing the makeup of York City Council as of 22 May 2019

Lender option borrower option loans

The council has two lender option borrower option loans (LOBOs) worth £5 million. Each run until 2060 and 2077, with current interest rates of 3.66 percent and 3.8 percent. One of the loans was taken out in 2008, on a 69-year term, and the other in 2010, on a 50-year term.[7]

References

  1. ^ a b Tillott, PM, ed. (1961). "The boundaries of the City". A History of the County of York: the City of York. Victoria County History. London: Victoria County History. pp. 311–321.
  2. ^ "English local elections 2007 - York". BBC News. 4 May 2007. Retrieved 23 September 2009.
  3. ^ "Tories & Lib Dems to run York - Chris Steward to be leader - Labour ousted - First policies revealed". York Press. Newsquest Yorkshire & North-East. 18 May 2015. Retrieved 19 May 2015.
  4. ^ "Council in chaos as outgoing leader quits Tories over 'act of betrayal' - but council tax set". York Press. Newsquest Yorkshire & North-East. 22 February 2018. Retrieved 15 May 2018.
  5. ^ "Two councillors quit Labour but continue as Independent Socialists York". York Press. Newsquest Yorkshire & North-East. 7 August 2018. Retrieved 4 October 2018.
  6. ^ "Lib Dems and the Green Party join forces to run City of York Council". YorkMix. 14 May 2019. Retrieved 16 May 2019.
  7. ^ Victoria Prest (14 July 2015). "City defends long-term loans, amid national controversy". York Press. Newsquest Yorkshire & North-East.

External links

1992 York City Council election

The 1992 York City Councils elections were held in May 1992 to elect members of York City Council in North Yorkshire, England. Fifteen seats, previously contested in 1988, were up for election: eleven were won by the Labour Party, three by the Conservative Party and one by the Liberal Democrats. The Labour Party retained overall control of the council; the composition of the council after the election was: Labour Party 34 seats, Conservative Party seven seats and Liberal Democrats four seats.

1994 York City Council election

The 1994 York City Council elections took place in May 1994 to elect the members of York City Council in North Yorkshire, England. These were the final elections to York City Council. Fifteen seats, previously contested in 1990, were up for election: twelve were won by the Labour Party, two by the Liberal Democrats and one by the Conservative Party.

1995 City of York Council election

Elections to the new City of York unitary authority were held on 4 May 1995. All 53 council seats in the city were up for election and the Labour Party won overall control of the council.

Labour had controlled the 1973-1995 York City Council as a majority group since 1986 but following the creation of an expanded City of York unitary authority 22 councillors were returned to represent parished areas previously part of the more rural district council areas of Ryedale (14 councillors), Selby (6) and Harrogate (2). These areas were generally considered to be less fertile territory for Labour. The 15 former York City Council wards were unchanged for this election but each unitary ward elected two councillors, rather than three. The only exception was Foxwood Ward, which continued to return three councillors on the basis of population growth.

In the context of a nationwide disaster for the Conservative Party, Labour won all but four of the former York City Council wards (all four were held by the Liberal Democrats), including both seats in Micklegate, previously a safe Conservative ward. In the parished areas outside the former York city council boundary Labour won three seats (Fulford, Heslington and Copmanthorpe) and the Liberal Democrats won 14. The Conservatives were reduced to just three seats and two Independent councillors were also elected.

1999 City of York Council election

Elections to City of York Council were held on 6 May 1999. All 53 council seats in the city were up for election and the Labour party kept overall control of the council.

2003 City of York Council election

Elections to City of York Council were held in 2003. The whole council was up for election. Boundary changes had reduced the number of seats from 53 to 47.

The election saw York's Labour Party lose control of the council covering central York for the first time since 1984. The Liberal Democrats won control of the council covering central York for the first time since the Liberal Party had last run the York Corporation in 1899.

The Council was made up of 29 Liberal Democrats, 15 Labour, two Green and one independent.

2007 City of York Council election

Local elections for City of York Council were held on Thursday 3 May 2007. The whole council was up for election. Of the 47 seats contested, the Liberal Democrats won 19 seats, Labour won 18 seats, Conservatives won eight seats and the Green Party won two seats. The election saw York's ruling Liberal Democrats lose ten seats and overall control of the council.

2011 City of York Council election

Elections to City of York Council were held on Thursday 5 May 2011. The whole council was up for election. The vote took place alongside the 2011 United Kingdom Alternative Vote referendum.

The Labour Party gained overall control of the council from no overall control. Labour had previously won a majority of seats on the new York unitary council in 1995 and again in 1999. The Liberal Democrats had controlled the council outright since 2003 and led a minority administration since the 2007 election.

Andrew Waller, leader of the Liberal Democrats group and former leader of the Council, was not reelected. Councillor Carol Runciman became leader of the Liberal Democrats group but stepped down in May 2013 and was replaced by Councillor Keith Aspden. Councillor Chris Steward became leader of the Conservative group in January 2014, succeeding Councillor Ian Gillies. Councillor James Alexander resigned as leader of the Labour Group and leader of the Council in November 2014, with Councillor Dafydd Williams taking on both of these roles.In August 2012, Lynn Jeffries, a Labour councillor resigned the whip in protest at the Council's cuts to social care, bringing the number of Independent Councillors to two; she subsequently joined the Liberal Democrat group.

Labour Councillor Brian Watson became an independent councillor in May 2014 after being deselected in Guildhall ward. In September 2014, Councillor Helen Douglas resigned from the Labour group and joined the Conservatives leading to Labour losing overall control of the Council. Councillors Ken King and David Scott resigned from the Labour group in October 2014. One seat was vacant following the death of councillor Lynn Jeffries in August 2014. The subsequent by-election held in October 2014 was won by Liberal Democrat former Council leader Andrew Waller. Conservative councillor Joe Watt left the Conservatives group in January 2015 after falling out with party leader Chris Steward.

2015 City of York Council election

The 2015 City of York Council election took place on 7 May 2015 to elect members of City of York Council in England. The whole council was up for election. Turnout was substantially up across the city due to the election being held on the same day as the general election and other local elections in England.

Since the previous election in 2011 a review of ward boundaries had affected some wards, although the total number of councillors remained at 47. The following wards remained unchanged from 2011: Acomb, Bishopthorpe, Dringhouses and Woodthorpe, Haxby and Wigginton, Holgate, Huntington and New Earswick, Micklegate, Strensall, Westfield and Wheldrake. All other wards saw boundary changes and a new ward, Copmanthorpe, was created from the former Rural West York Ward.

The election saw heavy losses for the ruling Labour Party, which had won overall control of the council in 2011, losing more than 40% of the 26 seats won at the previous election. Several senior Labour councillors were defeated including the party's deputy leader Tracey Simpson-Laing and Cabinet members Dave Merrett and Linsay Cunningham. The Conservatives, Liberal Democrats and Greens all made gains and two Independent councillors were also elected. A record number of new councillors were elected, almost half of the entire Council, with the York Press reporting that "of the 47 seats contested, 25 were won by candidates with council experience while 22 were won by debutants." Following talks between the political groups after the election, the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats agreed to run the Council as a joint administration.

2019 City of York Council election

Elections to City of York Council were held on 2 May 2019, as part of the United Kingdom local elections. The election resulted in substantial gains for the Liberal Democrats, who became the largest party, although no party surpassed the 24-seat majority threshold. The Conservatives suffered badly in this election, and lost 12 of the 14 seats they had won at the previous election. The Green Party held all their four seats, and surpassed the Conservatives in the popular vote. Labour gained two seats, although they failed to gain support in rural areas, where voters favoured the Liberal Democrats. On 14 May, The Liberal Democrats and the Green Party announced that they had agreed to run the council in a new 'progressive partnership' coalition, with Green Party leader Andy D'Agore assuming the role of Deputy Leader of the Council while Liberal Democrat leader Keith Aspden succeeded Ian Gillies as Leader of the Council.

A1237 road

The A1237 road is a road that runs to the west and north of the city of York, England. It forms part of the York Outer Ring Road as either end of the route forms junctions with the A64 to the south-west and east of the city to act as a city distributor. Construction began in 1984 and consisted of three distinct building phases. The road took three years to complete and has been subject since to studies looking to improve traffic flow and reduce accidents. The National Speed Limit for an A Class Road applies.

Millthorpe School

Millthorpe School is a mixed secondary school located in York, North Yorkshire, England.

It is situated in South Bank, York, and can be accessed via Scarcroft Road (the A59). It is close to two primary schools – namely Scarcroft Primary School and Knavesmire Primary School.

YO postcode area

The YO postcode area, also known as the York postcode area, is a group of postcode districts around Bridlington, Driffield, Filey, Malton, Pickering, Scarborough, Selby, Thirsk, Whitby and York in England.

York

York is a city and unitary authority area in North Yorkshire, England, with a population of 208,200 as of 2017. Located at the confluence of the Rivers Ouse and Foss, it is the county town of the historic county of Yorkshire. The city is known for its famous historical landmarks such as York Minster and the city walls, as well as a variety of cultural and sporting activities, which makes it a popular tourist destination in England. The local authority is the City of York Council, a single tier governing body responsible for providing all local services and facilities throughout the city. The City of York local government district includes rural areas beyond the old city boundaries.

The city was founded by the Romans as Eboracum in 71 AD. It became the capital of the Roman province of Britannia Inferior, and later of the kingdoms of Deira, Northumbria and Jórvík. In the Middle Ages, York grew as a major wool trading centre and became the capital of the northern ecclesiastical province of the Church of England, a role it has retained. In the 19th century, York became a major hub of the railway network and a confectionery manufacturing centre, a status it maintained well into the 20th century. During the Second World War, York was bombed as part of the Baedeker Blitz. Although less affected by bombing than other northern cities, several historic buildings were gutted and restoration efforts continued into the 1960s. In 2000, York suffered very severe flooding as the River Ouse rose, affecting over 300 homes.The economy of York is dominated by services. The University of York and National Health Service are major employers, whilst tourism has become an important element of the local economy. In 2016, York became sister cities with the Chinese city of Nanjing. An agreement signed by the Lord Mayor of York, focusing on building links in tourism, education, science, technology and culture. Today, the city is a popular tourist attraction, especially for international visitors from China and Asia. In 2017, York became UK's first human rights city, which formalised the city’s aim to use human rights in decision making.

York Central (UK Parliament constituency)

York Central is a parliamentary constituency which is represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament by Rachael Maskell of the Labour Party and the Co-operative Party, making it the only constituency in North Yorkshire not currently represented by the Conservatives.

York Community Stadium

York Community Stadium is a multi-purpose stadium currently under construction in Huntington, York, England. It will be owned by City of York Council, and be shared by York City Football Club and York City Knights Rugby League Football Club. The projected capacity of the all-seater stadium is 8,005.

The move to a new stadium was necessitated by the terms of the loan York City secured from the Football Stadia Improvement Fund to purchase their Bootham Crescent ground. Planning permission for the current design, put forward by Greenwich Leisure, was granted in March 2015. After several delays, construction began in December 2017, for completion in mid-2019. In addition to the stadium, the site will house a leisure complex and a community hub.

York Museums Trust

York Museums Trust (YMT) is the charity responsible for operating some key museums and galleries in York, England. The trust was founded in 2002 to run York's museums on behalf of the City of York Council. It has seen an increase in annual footfall of 254,000 to the venues since its foundation. In both 2016 and 2017 it saw its annual visitors numbers reach 500,000 people.

York Outer (UK Parliament constituency)

York Outer is a county constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election. It was created for the 2010 general election.

York park and ride

York park and ride is a park & ride system operated by City of York Council in the English city of York. It is the largest in the United Kingdom with 4,970 car spaces.

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