Chuck Klein

Charles Herbert Klein (October 7, 1904 – March 28, 1958), nicknamed the "Hoosier Hammer", was an American professional baseball outfielder. Klein played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Philadelphia Phillies (19281933, 19361939, 19401944), Chicago Cubs (19341936), and Pittsburgh Pirates (1939). He was one of the most prodigious National League sluggers in the late 1920s and early 1930s, and was the first All-Star Game player to be selected as a member of two different MLB teams (Phillies and Cubs). Klein was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1980.

Chuck Klein
Chuck Klein 1936 Goudey
Right fielder
Born: October 7, 1904
Indianapolis, Indiana
Died: March 28, 1958 (aged 53)
Indianapolis, Indiana
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
July 30, 1928, for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
June 1, 1944, for the Philadelphia Phillies
MLB statistics
Batting average.320
Home runs300
Runs batted in1,201
Teams
Career highlights and awards
Member of the National
Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Baseball Hall of Fame Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg Empty Star.svg
Induction1980
VoteVeterans Committee

Biography

Early life

Klein was born in Indianapolis, Indiana. He worked in a steel mill in his youth and played semipro baseball on his own time. The St. Louis Cardinals noticed his talent and signed him to a minor-league contract. He worked his way up to the Cardinals' farm team in Fort Wayne.

After hitting 26 homers in 88 games in 1928, Klein was slated to be called up to St. Louis midway through the season. However, Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis discovered that the Cardinals owned a team in Dayton, Ohio that played in the same league as Fort Wayne. Landis ordered the Cardinals to sell off the Fort Wayne team and give up the rights to its players. The Phillies outbid the New York Yankees for Klein's services, and Klein joined the Phillies in July.

MLB career

ChuckKleinbaseballcard
Klein's 1933 Goudey baseball card

Klein won the NL home run title in 1929, his first full year in the majors. However, he was helped along by his teammates on the last day of the season. In this game, the Phillies faced the New York Giants. The Giants' star slugger, Mel Ott, was tied with Klein for the lead with 42. In the first game, Klein homered to put him one ahead of Ott, who was held to a single. In the second game, the Phillies' pitchers walked Ott five straight times, including once with the bases loaded.

In 1930, Klein enjoyed one of the best offensive years in baseball history, batting .386 with 250 hits and 158 runs scored, all career highs. He also set career bests and still-standing Phillies records with 59 doubles, 170 runs batted in, a .687 slugging percentage and 445 total bases. No player has had as many total bases in a season since. His 107 extra-base hits that year are a National League record, tied by Barry Bonds in 2001. Along with his batting prowess, Klein was also a superb defensive right fielder who still holds the single-season mark with 44 assists in 1930. In 1932, Klein led the NL in both home runs and stolen bases. No player since has led the league in both categories in the same year. In 1933 Klein won the Triple Crown (.368, 28, 120), though Carl Hubbell took MVP honors. On July 6 of that year, he also became the first Phillies player ever to bat in an All-Star Game.

Traded to the Cubs for the 1934 season, Klein was a disappointment in Chicago by his previous standards. Even so, he hit 20 and 21 HRs in two seasons and batted .301 and .293. These were far below the numbers he posted in Philadelphia, leading to claims that Klein would not have hit nearly as many homers had he not played in notoriously hitter-friendly Baker Bowl. The Phillies reacquired him two years later. On July 10, 1936, Klein became the first NL player to slug four home runs in a game in the 20th century, and only the 4th player in major league history to accomplish the feat.

Klein went to the Pirates during the 1939 season, but was back in Philadelphia the following season. For the last five years of his career, he was a part-time player, often used as a pinch hitter. He retired after getting one hit in seven at-bats in 1944. In his 17-year career Klein batted .320, with 1,201 runs batted in, 1,168 runs, 2,076 hits, 398 doubles, 74 triples, 300 home runs, a .543 career slugging percentage, and an OPS of .922.

Later life and legacy

PhilsKlein
Chuck Klein was honored alongside the retired numbers of the Philadelphia Phillies in 2001.

After retiring, he ran a bar in Philadelphia for a time. He endured some difficult financial times, largely due to a drinking problem. Eventually, a stroke damaged his nervous system and left one leg paralyzed. By 1947, Klein was living with his sister-in-law in Indianapolis, Indiana. He died there in 1958.[1] Klein was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1980. In 1999, he ranked number 92 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players,[2] and was a nominee for the Major League Baseball All-Century Team.

The Phillies honored him on the outfield wall of Veterans Stadium with his name and an Old English-style "P" where a retired uniform number would go. The Phillies began using numbers in 1932, and in that season and 1933, Klein wore number 3. He was then traded to the Chicago Cubs, and when he returned to the Phillies in 1936, he wore 32 (later retired by the Phillies for Steve Carlton), and soon switched to 36 (later retired by the Phillies for Robin Roberts) for that season and 1937. In 1938 he wore number 1 (later retired by the Phillies for Richie Ashburn), wore 26 and then 14 (later retired by the Phillies for Jim Bunning) in 1939, wore 29 in 1940 and 1941, 3 again in 1942, 8 in 1943 and 26 again in 1944, his last major league season. Rather than choose one of these numbers, the Phillies simply retired a "P" for him, as they did for pre-numbers legend Grover Cleveland Alexander.

See also

Chuck Klein WOF
Klein was inducted into the Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame in 1980.

References

  1. ^ "Chuck Klein succumbs". Times-News. March 27, 1958. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  2. ^ "100 Greatest Baseball Players by The Sporting News : A Legendary List by Baseball Almanac". www.baseball-almanac.com.

Further reading

External links

Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Babe Herman
Pepper Martin
Hitting for the cycle
July 1, 1931
May 26, 1933
Succeeded by
Babe Herman
Arky Vaughan
Preceded by
Rogers Hornsby
National League Triple Crown
1933
Succeeded by
Joe Medwick
Preceded by
Lou Gehrig
Batters with 4 home runs in one game
July 10, 1936
Succeeded by
Pat Seerey
1930 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1930 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1931 Major League Baseball season

The 1931 Major League Baseball season.

1931 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1931 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1932 Major League Baseball season

The 1932 Major League Baseball season.

1932 Philadelphia Phillies season

The following lists the events of the 1932 Philadelphia Phillies season.

1933 Major League Baseball All-Star Game

The 1933 Major League Baseball All-Star Game was the first edition of the All-Star Game known as the "Midsummer Classic". This was the first official playing of the midseason exhibition baseball game between Major League Baseball's (MLB's) National League (NL) and American League (AL) All-Star teams. The game was held on July 6, 1933, at Comiskey Park in Chicago, Illinois, the home of the AL's Chicago White Sox. The game resulted in the AL defeating the NL 4–2, in two hours and five minutes.

The first MLB All-Star game (unofficial all-star game called the Addie Joss Benefit Game) was held on July 24, 1911, in Cleveland at Cleveland League Park (League Park, 1891–1946), the American League All-Stars versus the Cleveland Naps (1903–1915). The AL All-Stars won 5-3.

1935 Chicago Cubs season

The 1935 Chicago Cubs season was the 64th season for the Chicago Cubs franchise, the 60th in the National League and the 20th at Wrigley Field. The season saw the Cubs finish with 100 wins for the first time in 25 years; they would not win 100 games in another season until 2016. The Cubs won their 14th National League pennant in team history and faced the Detroit Tigers in the World Series, but lost in six games.

The 1935 season is largely remembered for the Cubs' 21-game winning streak. The streak began on September 4 with the Cubs 2.5 games out of first place. They would not lose again until September 28. The streak propelled the Cubs to the National League pennant. The 21-game winning streak tied the franchise and major league record set in 1880 when they were known as the Chicago White Stockings.

1936 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1936 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished eighth in the National League with a record of 54 wins and 100 losses.

1937 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1937 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in Major League Baseball. The Phillies finished seventh in the National League with a record of 61 wins and 92 losses.

1942 Philadelphia Phillies season

The 1942 Philadelphia Phillies season was the 60th season in the history of the franchise. The team, managed by Hans Lobert, began their fifth season at Shibe Park. Prior to the season, the team shortened the team nickname to 'Phils'. Of the change, a baseball writer opined prior to the season, "the gag is they wanted to get the 'lie' out of their name."

1980 Baseball Hall of Fame balloting

Elections to the Baseball Hall of Fame for 1980 followed the system in place since 1978.

The Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA) voted by mail to select from recent major league players and

elected Al Kaline and Duke Snider.

The Veterans Committee met in closed sessions to consider older major league players as well as managers, umpires, executives, and figures from the Negro Leagues.

It selected Chuck Klein and Tom Yawkey.

Bosse Field

Bosse Field is a baseball stadium located in Evansville, Indiana. Opened in 1915, it was the first municipally owned sports stadium in the United States and is the third-oldest ballpark still in regular use for professional baseball, surpassed only by Fenway Park (1912) in Boston and Wrigley Field (1914) in Chicago.It is the home field for the professional minor league Evansville Otters of the independent Frontier League, as well as high school and American Legion games, and in the past hosted spring training for the Detroit Tigers, college baseball, high school, college, and NFL football, college soccer, and concerts. Five Baseball Hall of Fame members played for Evansville teams at Bosse Field during their minor league careers, including Chuck Klein, Hank Greenberg, Warren Spahn, Bob Uecker, and Bert Blyleven. The historic stadium was also used in 1991 by Columbia Pictures for filming numerous game scenes in the 1992 comedy-drama, A League of Their Own.

Brian Sings and Swings

"Brian Sings and Swings" is the 19th episode of the fourth season of Family Guy. The episode was first broadcast on January 8, 2006. Brian meets Frank Sinatra Jr. and begins to perform on stage with him, and they are shortly joined by Stewie. Meanwhile, Meg pretends to be a lesbian after being offered a chance to join the Lesbian Alliance Club at her school.The episode was written by Michael Rowe and directed by Chuck Klein and Zac Moncrief. It received mostly positive reviews from critics for its storyline and many cultural references. The episode featured guest performances by Mark Borchardt, James Burkholder, Don LaFontaine, Mike Schank, Stacey Scowley, Frank Sinatra Jr., Nicole Sullivan, Fred Tatasciore, Audrey Wasilewski, along with several recurring guest voice actors for the series.

Chuck Klein (author)

Charles Henle "Chuck" Klein, Jr. (born March 20, 1942), is an American author, best known for writing about police ethics, the technique of instinct combat shooting, and hot rods. He is also a firearms instructor, a former law enforcement officer and a retired private investigator.

Da Doggone Daddy-Daughter Dinner Dance

"Da Doggone Daddy-Daughter Dinner Dance" is the second episode of The Cleveland Show. The episode aired on October 4, 2009 on Fox. In the episode, Cleveland tries to make inroads with his new stepdaughter Roberta by asking her to accompany him to the school’s father/daughter dance.The episode was written by Julius Sharpe and directed by Chuck Klein. It was viewed by approximately 8.7 million viewers in its original airing.

Evansville Evas

The Evansville Evas was a primary nickname of an early minor league baseball team in Evansville, Indiana. Early Evansville teams played in three leagues under a variety of nicknames from 1901–1931. Evansville was without a team until the 1938 Evansville Bees restarted Evansville baseball. Baseball Hall of Fame Inductees Hank Greenberg (1931) and Chuck Klein (1927) and Edd Roush (1912–1913) played for Evansville during the early era, joining Warren Spahn as Evansville alumni in the Hall of Fame. Beginning in 1915, Evansville played home games at Bosse Field, which is the third oldest baseball stadium in the United States, still in use today by the Evansville Otters of the Frontier League.

List of Major League Baseball single-game home run leaders

Writers of Sporting News described hitting four home runs in a single Major League Baseball (MLB) game as "baseball's greatest single-game accomplishment". Eighteen players have accomplished the feat to date, the most recent being J. D. Martinez with the Arizona Diamondbacks against the Los Angeles Dodgers on September 4, 2017. No player has done this more than once in his career and no player has ever hit more than four in a game. Bobby Lowe was the first to hit four home runs in a single game, doing so on May 30, 1894. Fans were reportedly so excited that they threw $160 in silver coins ($4,600 today) onto the field after his fourth home run.These games have resulted in other MLB single-game records due to the extreme offensive performance. Mark Whiten, for example, tied Jim Bottomley for the most runs batted in in a single game with 12 in his four-homer game. Shawn Green hit a double and a single along with his four home runs for 19 total bases, an MLB record. It surpassed Joe Adcock's mark of 18, which also came from a four-homer game.Chuck Klein, Pat Seerey, and Mike Schmidt each hit their four in a game that went into extra innings. Scooter Gennett and Mark Whiten hit a grand slam as one of their four homers. Four home runs generate significant offense that generally allows a team to win, although Ed Delahanty's and Bob Horner's teams lost their respective milestone games. In fact, in all but three of those games, two being the aforementioned players' games, the player's team scored ten or more runs.

Carlos Delgado is the only player to hit four home runs in a game in which he made only four plate appearances. No player has ever hit four home runs in a postseason game; that record is three, first accomplished by Babe Ruth in Game 4 of the 1926 World Series.Warren Spahn pitched the ball which Gil Hodges hit for the first of his four, the only Hall of Fame pitcher faced during a four-home-run game. Hodges, Adcock, and Martinez are the only players to hit home runs against four different pitchers in one game. Lowe and Delahanty, on the other hand, are the only players to hit four home runs in one game against just one pitcher: Ice Box Chamberlain and Adonis Terry, respectively.

Mike Cameron hit his four on May 2, 2002, and Green matched the total 21 days later on May 23, 2002, the shortest span between such games. Lowe and Seerey each hit fewer than 100 career home runs, while Willie Mays, with 660, hit more than any other player in this group. Both Mays and Schmidt are also members of the 500 home run club.

Of the 14 players eligible for the Hall of Fame who have hit four home runs in a game, five have been elected. Players are eligible for the Hall of Fame if they have played in at least 10 major league seasons and have been either retired for five seasons or deceased for at least six months. These requirements leave three players ineligible who are living and have played in the past five seasons and one (Seerey) who did not play 10 seasons in MLB.

List of Philadelphia Phillies team records

The Philadelphia Phillies have participated in 127 seasons in Major League Baseball since their inception in 1883. Through 2009, they have played 19,035 games, winning 9,035 and losing 10,162, for a winning their tenure as members of Major League Baseball's National League.

Chuck Klein, the franchise's only batting Triple Crown winner, holds the most franchise records as of the end of the 2009 season, with eight, including career slugging percentage, career on-base plus slugging (OPS), and single-season extra-base hits. He is followed by Billy Hamilton, who holds seven records, including career batting average and the single-season runs record.

Several Phillies hold National League and major league records. Pitcher/outfielder John Coleman is the most decorated in this category, holding three major league records, all from the franchise's inaugural season. Coleman set records for losses, earned runs allowed, and hits allowed, all in 1883 when he also set three additional franchise pitching records. Shortstop Jimmy Rollins broke Willie Wilson's record for at-bats in a single season with 716 in 2007, and first baseman Ryan Howard also set the major league record for strikeouts in a single season that same year with 199, before it was broken by Mark Reynolds of the Arizona Diamondbacks the following year. The 1930 Phillies, who went 52–102, set two more National League records, allowing 1,993 hits and 1,193 runs in the regular season.

Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame

The Philadelphia Baseball Wall of Fame is a collection of plaques, mounted on a brick wall next to the Left Field Gate at Citizens Bank Park, the ballpark of the Philadelphia Phillies. From 1978 to 2003, the Phillies inducted one figure from their franchise history and one notable person from the Philadelphia Athletics (A's) organization each year—with the exception of 1983, when the Phillies inducted their Centennial Team. Once Veterans Stadium closed in 2003, the wall plaques used to recognize the Phillies' members were moved to Citizens Bank Park; however, the Phillies no longer induct notable Athletics. Each person inducted into the Wall of Fame was honored with a metal plaque showing the person's face; their position with, and years of service to the team; and a summary of their most important contributions. In March 2004, the Athletics' plaques were relocated to the Philadelphia Athletics Historical Society in Hatboro, Pennsylvania, and a single plaque listing all of the A's inductees was attached to a statue of Connie Mack located across the street from Citizens Bank Park.Originally, the goal of the Wall of Fame was to induct the greatest players in Phillies and Athletics history; however, exceptions have been made for non-players who have made significant contributions to the organization. Mack, the Athletics' first inductee, had an 11-year playing career in the National League and the Players' League, but is most remembered for his managerial career, and was honored as such on the Wall. Members have been inducted for contributions in more than one area; Paul Owens, inducted in 1988, spent 48 years as a member of the Phillies organization, contributing as a scout, manager, general manager, and team executive. The Phillies have inducted four first basemen, four second basemen, five third basemen, three shortstops, one utility infielder, three catchers, 21 outfielders, 18 pitchers, seven managers, one general manager, one coach, two team executives, and two sportscasters. Twenty-one members of the Wall of Fame are also members of the Baseball Hall of Fame. All of the inductees in the first four seasons from both teams are members; Del Ennis was the first non-member to be inducted.

The first figures to be inducted into the Wall of Fame were Robin Roberts, who was inducted for the Phillies; and Mack, inducted for the A's. Roberts pitched in Philadelphia for 13 seasons as a member of the National League team, and Mack managed the American League club from 1901 to 1950. Although the Athletics have retired no numbers for players from their Philadelphia years, all seven players for whom the Phillies have retired a number or honored a "P" have been inducted into the Wall of Fame: Roberts (1978), Richie Ashburn (1979), Chuck Klein (1980), Grover Cleveland Alexander (1981), Jim Bunning (1984), Steve Carlton (1989), and Mike Schmidt (1990).On April 10, 2017, it was announced Pete Rose would be that year's inductee into the wall of fame. However, on August 12, 2017, just 10 days before the ceremony, the Phillies announced Rose would not be inducted amid statutory rape allegations. Instead of inducting someone new, they celebrated past inductees.

For the 2018 season Citizens Bank Park was renovated, resulting in the Phillies Wall of Fame being moved from Ashburn Alley. A new Wall of Fame area was created behind the Left Field scoreboard, next to the Left Field gate. This overhauled Left Field Plaza honors the team’s history and incorporates new concession offerings. Featuring large replicas of the team’s World Series trophies from 1980 and 2008, statues of its retired numbers along with the relocated Wall of Fame it is an area for fans to learn about and honor the team's past.

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