Chuck Daly

Charles Jerome Daly (July 20, 1930 – May 9, 2009) was an American basketball head coach. He led the Detroit Pistons two consecutive National Basketball Association (NBA) Championships in 1989 and 1990, and the 1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team ("The Dream Team") to the gold medal at the 1992 Summer Olympics.[1]

Daly is a two-time Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame inductee, being inducted in 1994 for his individual coaching career,[2] and in 2010 was posthumously inducted as the head coach of the "Dream Team".[3] The Chuck Daly Lifetime Achievement Award is named after him.[4]

Chuck Daly
Chuck Daly
Daly in 2006
Personal information
BornJuly 20, 1930
Kane, Pennsylvania
DiedMay 9, 2009 (aged 78)
Jupiter, Florida
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Listed weight180 lb (82 kg)
Career information
High schoolKane (Kane, Pennsylvania)
CollegeBloomsburg (1950–1952)
Coaching career1955–1999
Career history
As coach:
1955–1963Punxsutawney HS
1963–1969Duke (assistant)
1969–1971Boston College
1971–1977Penn
1978–1981Philadelphia 76ers (assistant)
19811982Cleveland Cavaliers
19831992Detroit Pistons
19921994New Jersey Nets
19971999Orlando Magic
Career highlights and awards
Basketball Hall of Fame as coach
College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2006

Early life

Born in Kane, Pennsylvania, to Earl and Geraldine Daly on July 20, 1930, Daly attended Kane Area High School. He matriculated at St. Bonaventure University for one year before transferring to Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated in 1952.[5] After serving two years in the military, he began his basketball coaching career in 1955 at Punxsutawney Area High School in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania.[1]

College career

After compiling a 111–70 record in eight seasons[5] at Punxsutawney High School, Daly moved on to the college level in 1963 as an assistant coach under Vic Bubas at Duke University. During his six seasons at Duke, the Blue Devils won the Atlantic Coast Conference championship and advanced to the Final Four, both in 1964 and 1966.[6] Daly then replaced Bob Cousy as head coach at Boston College in 1969. The Eagles recorded an 11–13 record in Daly's first year at the school, and improved to 15–11 in 1971.[7]

Daly became the head coach at the University of Pennsylvania in 1971, succeeding Dick Harter. Penn won twenty or more games and captured the Ivy League title in each of its first four seasons with Daly at the helm.[8] The most successful campaign was his first in 1972, when the Quakers recorded a 25–3 record overall (13–1 in their conference), and advanced to the NCAA East Regional Final, eventually losing to North Carolina.[9] An additional significant success for Daly was in 1979, when all five starters on Pennsylvania's Final Four team had initially been recruited by Daly.[8] His overall record after six seasons at Penn was 125–38 (74–10 within the Ivy League).

NBA and national team career

In 1978, Daly joined the NBA's Philadelphia 76ers as an assistant coach. During the 1981 season, the Cleveland Cavaliers hired him as the third head coach that season, but was fired with a 9-32 record before the season ended.[10] He then returned to the 76ers as a broadcaster until he was hired in 1983 by the Detroit Pistons. The Pistons, a club that had never recorded back-to-back winning seasons before Daly's tenure, made the NBA playoffs each year he was head coach (1983–1992), as well as reaching the NBA finals three times, winning two consecutive NBA championships in 1989 and 1990. While serving as the Pistons coach, Daly was also a color commentator for TBS's NBA Playoff coverage.

Daly was named head coach of the U.S. Dream Team that won the gold medal at the 1992 Olympics,[3] before moving his NBA career onto the New Jersey Nets for the 1992–93 season. Daly stayed with the Nets for two seasons, before resigning over frustration over the immaturity of some of the players on his team.[11]

Daly again took up a role as color commentator for TNT's NBA coverage during the mid-1990s. Daly rejected an offer to coach the New York Knicks over the Summer of 1995 after deciding he wasn't ready for the NBA coaching grind.[12] He would return to coaching with the Orlando Magic at the beginning of the 1997–98 season. Daly stayed two seasons with the Magic and then retired permanently.

Death

Daly was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in March 2009 and died on May 9, 2009, at the age of 78.[1] He is survived by his wife Terry, daughter Cydney, and two grandchildren. He is buried at Riverside Memorial Park in Tequesta, Florida.[13]

Head coaching record

College

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Boston College Eagles (NCAA University Division independent) (1969–1971)
1969–70 Boston College 11–13
1970–71 Boston College 15–11
Boston College: 26–24
Penn Quakers (Ivy League) (1971–1977)
1971–72 Penn 25–3 13–1 1st NCAA University Division Third Round
1972–73 Penn 21–7 12–2 1st NCAA University Division Third Round
1973–74 Penn 21–6 13–1 1st NCAA Division I First Round
1974–75 Penn 23–5 13–1 1st NCAA Division I First Round
1975–76 Penn 17–9 11–3 2nd
1976–77 Penn 18–8 12–2 2nd
Penn: 125–38 74–10
Total: 151–62

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

NBA

Legend
Regular season G Games coached W Games won L Games lost W–L % Win–loss %
Playoffs PG Playoff games PW Playoff wins PL Playoff losses PW–L % Playoff win–loss %

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c "Chuck Daly, Pistons Coach, Dies at 78". The New York Times. May 9, 2009. Retrieved 2015-09-15. Daly played basketball at St. Bonaventure and at Bloomsburg (Pa.) State College ...
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-08-31. Retrieved 2009-08-17.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ a b "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-08-18. Retrieved 2015-03-11.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "Pat Riley Receives Chuck Daly Lifetime Achievement Award". Interlink Magazines, LLC. Retrieved June 22, 2013.
  5. ^ a b Official NBA Register. 2003–04 Edition. St. Louis, MO: The Sporting News, 2003.
  6. ^ "Former Duke Assistant/NBA Coaching Legend Chuck Daly Passes Away". goduke.com.
  7. ^ Boston College 2008–09 Men's Basketball Media Guide. Archived 2011-08-07 at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ a b University of Pennsylvania 2008–09 Men's Basketball Media Guide. Archived 2011-07-19 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ "Chuck Daly Passes Away at Age 78," University of Pennsylvania Athletics, Saturday, May 9, 2009. Archived July 19, 2011, at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ Sportmeisters, The. "Remembering Chuck Daly". Bleacher Report.
  11. ^ Kerber, Fred (5 July 2014). "Nets' coaching exits have not been pretty".
  12. ^ BEST, NEIL (25 June 1995). "Knicks Moving to Plan B : Pro basketball: Daly scuttles hopes of getting the coach they wanted, but Nelson likely waiting in the wings" – via LA Times.
  13. ^ "Find a Grave Record".
1990 NBA All-Star Game

The 40th National Basketball Association All-Star Game was played on February 11, 1990 at Miami Arena in Miami, Florida. Magic Johnson was named the game's MVP.

The East was led by the trio of Celtics' big men Larry Bird, Kevin McHale, Robert Parish, and the Bulls' dynamic duo of Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen. The trio of Piston players Isiah Thomas, Joe Dumars and Dennis Rodman, plus Charles Barkley, Reggie Miller, Dominique Wilkins and center Patrick Ewing completed the team.

The West was led by the Lakers' trio of Magic Johnson, James Worthy, and A.C. Green. Clyde Drexler, Akeem Olajuwon, John Stockton, David Robinson, Rolando Blackman, Lafayette Lever and Tom Chambers completed the team.Coaches: East: Chuck Daly, West: Pat Riley. This was the first of four consecutive All-Star Games in which the coaches of the previous year's NBA Finals were the head coaches of the All-Star Game.

This was the last NBA All-Star Game broadcast by CBS before moving to NBC in the following year.

1991–92 Detroit Pistons season

The 1991–92 NBA season was the Pistons' 44th season in the National Basketball Association, and 35th season in the city of Detroit. During the offseason, the Pistons acquired Orlando Woolridge from the Denver Nuggets. The Pistons got off to a slow start with a 9–13 record, but managed to win 10 of their next 13 games. They won seven consecutive games in March, then won six in a row in April, finishing third in the Central Division with a 48–34 record. Three members of the team, Isiah Thomas, Joe Dumars and Dennis Rodman were all selected for the 1992 NBA All-Star Game. Despite leading the league with an incredible 18.7 rebounds per game, Rodman fell short of his quest for a third straight Defensive Player of The Year award. Throughout the season, speculation that it was Chuck Daly's last season as coach of the Pistons lingered in the media, intensifying as the season went out and well into the playoffs.As the “Bad Boys” era was fading, they were eliminated in five games in the first round of the playoffs by the New York Knicks. The Pistons would not return to the playoffs until 1996. Following the season, Chuck Daly left to coach the New Jersey Nets, and John Salley was traded to the Miami Heat. Meanwhile, the Bulls-Pistons rivalry took another ugly turn as Thomas was left off the Dream Team coached by Daly, reportedly at the request of Michael Jordan.

1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team

The 1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team, nicknamed the "Dream Team", was the first American Olympic team to feature active professional players from the National Basketball Association (NBA). The team has been described by American and international journalists as the greatest sports team ever assembled. The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame called the team "the greatest collection of basketball talent on the planet". At the 1992 Summer Olympics held in Barcelona, the team defeated its opponents by an average of 44 points en route to the gold medal against Croatia. Chuck Daly served as coach, assisted by Lenny Wilkens, P. J. Carlesimo, and Mike Krzyzewski.

1992–93 New Jersey Nets season

The 1992–93 New Jersey Nets season was the Nets' 26th season in the National Basketball Association, and 17th season in East Rutherford, New Jersey. The Nets hired Chuck Daly as head coach, acquired Rumeal Robinson from the Atlanta Hawks, and signed free agents Rick Mahorn and Jayson Williams during the offseason. Under Daly, the Nets continued to improve getting off to a solid 31–24 start, before losing second-year star Kenny Anderson for the remainder of the season to a wrist injury. Midway through the season, the Nets signed free agents Maurice Cheeks and former New York Knicks star Bernard King. Despite losing ten of their final eleven games, they finished third in the Atlantic Division with a 43–39 record. The club qualified for the playoffs, but were eliminated in the first round by the Cleveland Cavaliers in five games.

Following the season, tragedy struck as scoring leader Dražen Petrović died in an automobile accident in Germany on June 7, 1993. Also following the season, Sam Bowie was traded to the Los Angeles Lakers, Chris Dudley signed as an unrestricted free agent with the Portland Trail Blazers, and King and Cheeks both retired.

1993–94 New Jersey Nets season

The 1993–94 New Jersey Nets season was the Nets' 27th season in the National Basketball Association, and 18th season in East Rutherford, New Jersey. During the offseason, the Nets signed free agents Kevin Edwards and Armen Gilliam, while acquiring Benoit Benjamin from the Los Angeles Lakers. Without Dražen Petrović, who died in an automobile accident during the offseason; Derrick Coleman and Kenny Anderson would both step it up, having All-Star seasons being selected for the 1994 NBA All-Star Game. The Nets got off to a rough start losing 10 of their first 14 games, as they later on traded Rumeal Robinson to the Charlotte Hornets for Johnny Newman. However, the Nets would win 8 of their final 11 games finishing third in the Atlantic Division with a 45–37 record. In the first round of the playoffs, the Nets would lose in four games to the New York Knicks. Following the season, a frustrated Chuck Daly stepped down as head coach after clashing with Coleman and Anderson, and Newman signed as a free agent with the Milwaukee Bucks.

1997–98 Orlando Magic season

The 1997–98 NBA season was the ninth season for the Orlando Magic in the National Basketball Association. The Magic hired Chuck Daly as head coach, who won two championships coaching the Detroit Pistons. Offseason acquisitions included All-Star guard Mark Price from the Golden State Warriors, Derek Harper from the Dallas Mavericks, and free agent Bo Outlaw. Under Daly, the Magic would get off to a solid 16–7 start. However, they struggled losing nine of their next ten games, as Anfernee Hardaway played just 19 games due to a knee injury, and Darrell Armstrong was out for the remainder of the season with a torn right rotator cuff in his shoulder after 48 games. At midseason, Rony Seikaly was traded to the New Jersey Nets as the Magic finished fifth in the Atlantic Division with a record of 41–41, missing the playoffs for the first time since the 1992–93 season.

Hardaway was selected for the 1998 NBA All-Star Game, which would be his final All-Star appearance. Following the season, Price retired after playing 12 years in the NBA, and Harper signed as a free agent with the Los Angeles Lakers.

1998–99 Orlando Magic season

The 1998–99 NBA season was the tenth season for the Orlando Magic in the National Basketball Association. During the offseason, the Magic signed free agents Isaac Austin and All-Star forward Dominique Wilkins. After missing most of the previous year with a knee injury, Anfernee Hardaway played a full season, but would no longer be the same leading the team with just 15.8 points per game. The Magic played solid basketball winning 14 of their first 18 games, and finished the lockout-shortened season second in the Atlantic Division with a 33–17 record, returning to the playoffs as the #3 seed in the Eastern Conference after a one-year absence. Guard Darrell Armstrong had a breakout season winning both the Sixth Man and Most Improved Player awards. However, in the first round of the playoffs, the Magic lost to the 6th–seeded Philadelphia 76ers in four games.

Following the season, head coach Chuck Daly retired, Hardaway was traded to the Phoenix Suns, Nick Anderson was traded to the Sacramento Kings after ten seasons in Orlando, Horace Grant was dealt to the Seattle SuperSonics, Austin was sent to the Washington Wizards, and Wilkins along with his brother Gerald Wilkins both retired.

For the season, the Magic changed their uniforms which lasted until 2003.

50 Greatest Players in NBA History

The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (also referred to as NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team or NBA's Top 50) were chosen in 1996 to honor the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA). These fifty players were selected through a vote by a panel of media members, former players and coaches, and current and former general managers. In addition, the top ten head coaches and top ten single-season teams in NBA history were selected by media members as part of the celebration. The fifty players had to have played at least a portion of their careers in the NBA and were selected irrespective of position played.

The list was announced by NBA commissioner David Stern on October 29, 1996, at the hotel Grand Hyatt New York, the former site of the Commodore Hotel, where the original NBA charter was signed on June 6, 1946. The announcement marked the beginning of a season-long celebration of the league's anniversary. Forty-seven of the fifty players were later assembled in Cleveland, during the halftime ceremony of the 1997 All-Star Game. Three players were absent: Pete Maravich, who had died in 1988, at forty; Shaquille O'Neal, who was recovering from a knee injury; and Jerry West, who was scheduled to have surgery for an ear infection and could not fly. At the time of the announcement, eleven players were active; all have subsequently retired. O'Neal was the last to be active in the NBA, retiring at the end of the 2010–11 season.

Bill Fitch

William Charles Fitch (born May 19, 1932) is an American former National Basketball Association (NBA) coach who had been successful in developing a number of teams into playoff contenders. Before entering the professional ranks, he coached college basketball at the University of Minnesota, Bowling Green State University, the University of North Dakota, and his alma mater, Coe College. Fitch's teams twice qualified for the NCAA tournament. He won the Chuck Daly Lifetime Achievement Award for the 2012–13 NBA season.Fitch was a U.S. Marine Corps drill instructor, a fact that Larry Bird credited in his book Drive: The Story of My Life as an important reason for Bird's own strong work ethic. Bill Fitch was elected to the National Basketball Hall of Fame in 2019.

Chuck Daly Lifetime Achievement Award

Chuck Daly Lifetime Achievement Award is an annual award given by the National Basketball Association to a longtime NBA coach's life in basketball and his "standard of integrity, competitive excellence and tireless promotion" of the game. The inaugural award winner was Tommy Heinsohn. The award is named after former NBA Head coach Chuck Daly.

Jordan Rules

The Jordan Rules were a defensive basketball strategy employed by the Detroit Pistons against Michael Jordan in order to limit his effectiveness on offense. Devised by Isiah Thomas in 1988, the Pistons' strategy was "to play him tough, to physically challenge him and to vary its defenses so as to try to throw him off balance." Sometimes the Pistons would overplay Jordan to keep the ball from him. Sometimes they would play him straight up, more often they would run a double-team at him as soon as he touched the ball to try to force him to give it up. And whenever he went to the basket, they made sure his path was contested. This strategy has also sometimes been employed against other prolific scoring guards. The Jordan Rules were an instrumental aspect of the rivalry between the "Bad Boys" Pistons and Jordan's Chicago Bulls in the late 1980s and early 1990s. This style of defense limited players including Jordan from entering the paint and was carried out by Dennis Rodman and Bill Laimbeer.

The Jordan Rules were most effective for the Pistons during their first three playoff meetings with the Bulls. Detroit beat Chicago four games to one in the 1988 Eastern Conference Semifinals. The Pistons and Bulls met each other in the NBA Eastern Conference Finals for the next 3 seasons. Detroit's defense defeated the Bulls in 6 games in 1989 and in 7 games in 1990. The Pistons won back-to-back championships after eliminating the Bulls. Finally, in 1991, the Bulls defeated the Pistons in the playoffs, neutralizing the Jordan Rules with their triangle offense, orchestrated by coach Phil Jackson and assistant Tex Winter. They swept the Pistons in the 1991 Eastern Conference Finals. Soon after, the Bulls captured their 1st-ever NBA title, beating the Los Angeles Lakers in the NBA Finals 4 games to 1. The Pistons qualified for the playoffs again in 1992, 1996, 1997, 1999, and 2000, not advancing to the second round until 2002.

This strategy was later used by the New York Knicks from 1992 to 1998. However, the Knicks were not as successful as Detroit in containing Jordan and the Bulls. Jordan faced New York in the NBA Playoffs in 1991, 1992, 1993, and 1996. The Bulls eliminated the Knicks and captured NBA titles in all four of those seasons.

In an interview with Sports Illustrated, then Detroit Pistons coach Chuck Daly described the Jordan Rules as:

When doing an ESPN 30 for 30, Joe Dumars said that,

Lenny Wilkens

Leonard Randolph Wilkens (born October 28, 1937) is an American former basketball player and coach in the National Basketball Association (NBA). He has been inducted three times into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame, first in 1989 as a player, as a coach in 1998, and in 2010 as part of the 1992 United States Olympic "Dream Team", for which he was an assistant coach. He is also a 2006 inductee into the College Basketball Hall of Fame.

Wilkens was a combined 13-time NBA All-Star as a player (nine times) and as a head coach (four times), was the 1993 NBA Coach of the Year, won the 1979 NBA Championship as the head coach of the Seattle SuperSonics, and an Olympic gold medal as the head coach of the 1996 U.S. men's basketball team.

During the 1994–95 season, Wilkens set the record for most coaching wins in NBA history, a record he held when he retired with 1,332 victories. Wilkens is now second on the list behind Don Nelson, who broke it in 2010. He won the Chuck Daly Lifetime Achievement Award for the 2010–11 NBA season. Wilkens is also the most prolific coach in NBA history, at 2,487 regular season games, 89 more games than Nelson, and over 400 more than any other coach, and has more losses than any other coach in NBA history, at 1,155.

List of Brooklyn Nets head coaches

The Brooklyn Nets are an American professional basketball team based in Brooklyn, New York. They are a member of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The team plays its home games at the Barclays Center. The franchise was founded as the New Jersey Americans in 1967, and was one of the eleven original American Basketball Association (ABA) teams. In its second ABA season, Arthur Brown, the team owner, moved the team to Long Island and renamed it the New York Nets. The team won ABA championships in 1974 and 1976. When the ABA merged with the NBA in 1976, the Nets were one of four ABA teams admitted into the NBA. The team was moved to the Rutgers Athletic Center in New Jersey; after the 1976–77 NBA season, the team was renamed the New Jersey Nets. Since they joined the NBA, the Nets have won 4 divisional championships, 2 conference championships and appeared in the playoffs 16 times. The Nets moved to Brooklyn in 2012, and now play as the Brooklyn Nets.

There have been 23 head coaches for the Nets franchise. The franchise's first head coach was Max Zaslofsky, who led the team for two seasons. Kevin Loughery is the only Nets coach to have led the team to a championship; the Nets won ABA championships in 1974 and 1976 during his tenure. Loughery is the franchise's all-time leader in regular-season games coached (615) and wins (297); P. J. Carlesimo is the franchise's all-time leader in regular-season winning percentage (.648). Byron Scott is the franchise's all-time leader in playoff games coached (40) and wins (25), as well as playoff-game winning percentage (.625). Chuck Daly and Bill Fitch were selected as two of the top 10 coaches in NBA history. Daly, Brown and Lou Carnesecca are the only Nets coaches to have been inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame as coaches. Zaslofsky, York Larese, Lou Carnesecca, Dave Wohl, Butch Beard, John Calipari, Tom Barrise, and Kiki Vandeweghe spent their entire coaching careers with the Nets/Americans.

List of Cleveland Cavaliers head coaches

The Cleveland Cavaliers are an American professional basketball team based in Cleveland, Ohio. The Cavaliers play in the Central Division of the Eastern Conference in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The team joined the NBA in 1970 as an expansion team and won their first Eastern Conference championship in 2007. The Cavaliers have played their home games at Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse, formerly known as Quicken Loans Arena and Gund Arena, since 1994. The Cavaliers are owned by Dan Gilbert, with Koby Altman as their general manager. American R&B-pop singer Usher Raymond is a minority owner.There have been 21 head coaches for the Cavaliers franchise. The franchise's first head coach was Bill Fitch, who coached for nine seasons. Fitch is the franchise's all-time leader for the most regular-season games coached (738); Lenny Wilkens is the franchise's all-time leader for the most regular-season game wins (316); Mike Brown is the franchise's all-time leader for the most playoff games coached (71), the most playoff-game wins (42), and the highest regular-season winning percentage (.620). Chuck Daly, Wilkens and Fitch have been elected into the Basketball Hall of Fame as head coaches, partly due to their work with the Cavaliers. Fitch, Daly and Wilkens were also named as 3 of the top 10 coaches in NBA history. Fitch and Brown are the only Cavaliers coaches to have won the NBA Coach of the Year Award. Don Delaney spent his entire NBA coaching careers with the Cavaliers.

List of Detroit Pistons head coaches

The Detroit Pistons are an American professional basketball team based in Detroit, Michigan. They play in the Central Division of the Eastern Conference in the National Basketball Association (NBA). The team, owned by Tom Gores, plays its home games at Little Caesars Arena. The franchise was founded in 1941 by Fred Zollner as the Fort Wayne Zollner Pistons, playing in the National Basketball League (NBL). In 1948, the team was renamed to the Fort Wayne Pistons and joined the Basketball Association of America (BAA), which merged with the NBL to become the NBA a year later. After spending nine seasons in Fort Wayne, Indiana, Zollner moved the team to Detroit, Michigan in 1957 to be able to compete financially with other big city teams. In the 1980s, general manager Jack McCloskey was instrumental in the Pistons' future championship runs by drafting Isiah Thomas, acquiring key players like Joe Dumars and Dennis Rodman and hiring head coach Chuck Daly. The 1980s team, known today as "the Bad Boys" due to the physical playing style, eventually won two championships in the 1989 and 1990 NBA Finals under Daly. The Pistons won their third title in the 2004 NBA Finals under the tenure of Larry Brown.There have been 36 head coaches for the Pistons franchise since joining the NBA. The franchise's first head coach while in the NBA was Carl Bennett, who coached the team for six games, all of which are losses. Chuck Daly is the franchise's all-time leader in regular-season games coached (738), regular-season games won (467), playoff games coached (113), and playoff games won (71); Flip Saunders is the franchise's all-time leader in regular-season winning percentage (.715). Daly and Larry Brown are the only members of the franchise to have been inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame as coaches; Daly was also selected as one of the top 10 coaches in NBA history. Both Ray Scott and Rick Carlisle have won NBA Coach of the Year in the 1973–74 and 2001–02 season, with the Pistons respectively. Former coach Dick Vitale was named to the Basketball Hall of Fame in honor of the work he did as a basketball broadcaster after leaving the Pistons. Sixteen head coaches have spent their entire NBA head coaching careers with the Pistons. Curly Armstrong, Red Rocha, Dick McGuire, Dave DeBusschere, Donnie Butcher, Terry Dischinger, Earl Lloyd, Scott, and Michael Curry formerly played for the team. The current head coach of the Pistons is Dwane Casey.

List of NBA championship head coaches

The National Basketball Association (NBA) is a major professional basketball league in North America. It was founded in 1946 as the Basketball Association of America (BAA). The league adopted its current name at the start of the 1949–50 season when it merged with the National Basketball League (NBL). The league consists of 30 teams, of which 29 are located in the United States and one in Canada. In the NBA, a head coach is the highest ranking coach of a coaching staff. They typically hold a more public profile and are paid more than the assistant coaches.

Former Los Angeles Lakers head coach Phil Jackson won eleven NBA championships, the most in NBA history. He won six titles with the Chicago Bulls and five titles with the Lakers, and is the only coach who has won multiple championships with more than one team. Red Auerbach won nine championships with the Boston Celtics and won eight consecutive titles from 1959 to 1966. John Kundla, Pat Riley, and current San Antonio Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich have each won five championships. Kundla won all of his titles with the Lakers, and Popovich has won all of his titles with the Spurs, while Riley won four titles with the Lakers and one with the Miami Heat. Current Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr has won three championships, while current Miami Heat head coach Erik Spoelstra has won two titles. Los Angeles Clippers head coach Doc Rivers, Dallas Mavericks head coach Rick Carlisle and Toronto Raptors head coach Nick Nurse are the only other active coaches who have won a championship, Rivers having won while with the Boston Celtics in 2008.

Of the championship head coaches, 14 (Auerbach, Larry Brown, Carlisle, Bill Fitch, Tom Heinsohn, Red Holzman, Jackson, Kerr, Dick Motta, Popovich, Riley, Rivers, Bill Sharman, and Lenny Wilkens) have won the Coach of the Year Award. 13 (Auerbach, Brown, Chuck Daly, Fitch, Alex Hannum, Heinsohn, Holzman, Jackson, Kundla, Jack Ramsay, Riley, Sharman, and Wilkens) have been elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as a coach. Several more have been enshrined as players or contributors. Fourteen of the head coaches also won championships as players, with both Buddy Jeannette and Bill Russell having won their only manager titles as player-coach. Riley and Lue are two of the only three coaches (Paul Westhead being the third) who have led teams to titles having only arrived in mid-season.

List of Penn Quakers men's basketball head coaches

The Penn Quakers men's basketball program is a college basketball team that represents the University of Pennsylvania. The team plays at the Division I level of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). They compete in the Ivy League of the NCAA, where they have been since 1897. They play their home games at Palestra in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, named after palaestra, the ancient Greek wrestling school.The men's team has had 19 official head coaches in its history. The team has played in 2,831 games over 116 seasons of collegiate play from the 1896–97 season to the 2016–17 season (excluding 1897 to 1901, when the Quakers did not play due to low attendance and lack of interest), compiling a record of 1742–1088–1 (.615).For the first five years they played, the team had no coach. Russell Smith became the first head coach for the team in 1905. In Smith's four seasons as head coach, the team went 74–22–0 (.771), the best winning record out of any of the coaches in team history. The team made their first NCAA Tournament appearance in 1953, under Howard Dallmar. 17 years later, Dick Harter was the next coach to bring the team to an NCAA Tournament bid. Under coaches Chuck Daly (1971–1977) and Bob Weinhauer (1977–1982), the team made nine tournament bids in 11 years, including an appearance in the Final Four. Fran Dunphy (1989–2006) compiled the most conference and overall wins as head coach with 310 wins and 191 wins, respectively. He also has the most NCAA Tournament appearances out of any head coach (10), but in nine of those appearances, the team was knocked out in the first round. As of 2017, Steve Donahue is the current head coach for the team. In his two seasons as head coach, he has compiled a record of 24–32–0 (.429).

NBA Conference Finals

The National Basketball Association Conference Finals are the Eastern and Western championship series of the National Basketball Association (NBA), a major professional basketball league in North America. The NBA was founded in 1946 as the Basketball Association of America (BAA). The NBA adopted its current name at the start of the 1949–50 season when the BAA merged with the National Basketball League (NBL). The league currently consists of 30 teams, of which 29 are located in the United States and 1 in Canada. Each team plays 82 games in the regular season. After the regular season, eight teams from each of the league's two conferences qualify for the playoffs. At the end of the playoffs, the top two teams play each other in the Conference Finals, to determine the Conference Champions from each side, who then proceed to play in the NBA Finals.

National Basketball Coaches Association

The National Basketball Coaches Association (NBCA) is an American organization and union that represents coaches in the National Basketball Association. It was founded in the 1970s and consists of all NBA head coaches, assistant coaches and alumni.The executive director for nearly four decades was Michael H. Goldberg, who died in 2017.It administers the league's NBA Coach of the Year award, which dates back to 1962, which is voted on by a media panel of writers, reporters and broadcasters.

In 2009, it established the Chuck Daly Lifetime Achievement Award, in honor of the former Pistons, Magic, Nets, and Cavaliers coach.In 2017, it created the Michael H. Goldberg NBCA Coach of the Year Award, in honor of the Association's longtime executive director. The annual winner is selected by the 30 coaches in the NBA.

Team Year G W L W–L% Finish PG PW PL PW–L% Result
Cleveland 1981–82 41 9 32 .220 (fired)
Detroit 1983–84 82 49 33 .598 2nd in Central 5 2 3 .400 Lost in First Round
Detroit 1984–85 82 46 36 .561 2nd in Central 9 5 4 .556 Lost in Conference Semifinals
Detroit 1985–86 82 46 36 .561 3rd in Central 4 1 3 .250 Lost in First Round
Detroit 1986–87 82 52 30 .634 2nd in Central 15 10 5 .667 Lost in Conference Finals
Detroit 1987–88 82 54 28 .659 1st in Central 23 14 9 .609 Lost in NBA Finals
Detroit 1988–89 82 63 19 .768 1st in Central 17 15 2 .882 Won NBA Championship
Detroit 1989–90 82 59 23 .720 1st in Central 20 15 5 .750 Won NBA Championship
Detroit 1990–91 82 50 32 .610 2nd in Central 15 7 8 .467 Lost in Conference Finals
Detroit 1991–92 82 48 34 .585 3rd in Central 5 2 3 .400 Lost in First Round
New Jersey 1992–93 82 43 39 .524 3rd in Atlantic 5 2 3 .400 Lost in First Round
New Jersey 1993–94 82 45 37 .549 3rd in Atlantic 4 1 3 .250 Lost in First Round
Orlando 1997–98 82 41 41 .500 5th in Atlantic Missed playoffs
Orlando 1998–99 50 33 17 .660 1st in Atlantic 4 1 3 .250 Lost in First Round
Career 1,075 638 437 .593 126 75 51 .595

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