Chronicle-Telegraph Cup

The Chronicle-Telegraph Cup was the trophy awarded to the winner of a postseason competition in American professional baseball in 1900. The series, played only once, was a precursor to the current World Series.

The Pittsburgh Pirates[1] finished in second place, 4.5 games behind the Brooklyn Superbas, in the 1900 National League season (the only Major League in American baseball at the time). Fans of the Pittsburgh club felt their club was every bit the equal of the Brooklyn nine. While Brooklyn led the league in offense, Pirates fans claimed their team, which led the NL in strikeouts and ERA, boasted the pitching to best Brooklyn. A local newspaper, the Pittsburgh Chronicle Telegraph, offered to award a silver cup to the winner of a best-of-five series between the two teams.

Despite the series being held in Allegheny, Pennsylvania, which was annexed into Pittsburgh in 1907, the Superbas prevailed, 3–1. The teams were evenly matched in most statistical categories — both totaled 15 runs apiece, batted about .230 and had comparable numbers of extra-base hits (neither team hit any home runs) and walks. Both teams' ERAs were below 1.30.

However, Pittsburgh committed 14 errors to Brooklyn's 4, letting the Superbas win by comfortable margins. Three unearned runs in the top of the sixth inning of Game 2 allowed the Superbas to break a 1–1 tie, and Pirates pitcher Sam Leever's crucial fourth-inning error in Game 4 broke the game open for Brooklyn. A 10–0 blowout behind Deacon Phillippe's six-hitter in Game 3 gave the Pirates their only win in the series.

Pirates' outfielder Honus Wagner led his team in batting average (.400), hits (6), doubles (1), RBIs (3) and stolen bases (2). Brooklyn's Wee Willie Keeler also cranked out 6 hits to lead his club, posting a .353 average. The Superbas' Fielder Jones had 4 RBIs.

The Pirates won the next three National League pennants and played in the inaugural World Series in 1903. The Brooklyn baseball club did not win another postseason series until 1955, their first World Series championship.

1900 Chronicle-Telegraph Cup Series
Champion:Brooklyn Superbas (3)
Runner-upPittsburgh Pirates (1)
Dates:October 15–18
Location:Exposition Park, Allegheny City, Pennsylvania
Umpires:Tim Hurst, Ed Swartwood
Hall of Famers:Superbas: Ned Hanlon (mgr.), Hughie Jennings, Willie Keeler, Joe Kelley, Joe McGinnity
Pirates: Fred Clarke‡ (mgr.), Jack Chesbro, Rube Waddell, Honus Wagner
‡ elected as a player.

The series

1900 Brooklyn Superbas
1900 Brooklyn Superbas

Game 1

October 15, 1900

Two future Hall of Famers faced off as NL ERA leader Rube Waddell of the Pirates threw against Joe McGinnity, who led the league with 28 wins. McGinnity shut out the Pirates for eight innings before two unearned runs in the top of the ninth denied him the shutout. Waddell gave up 13 hits but only five runs, despite four errors by his fielders.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Brooklyn 0 0 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 5 13 1
Pittsburgh 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 5 4
W: Joe McGinnity (1–0)   L: Rube Waddell (0–1)   Att.: 4,000

Game 2

October 16, 1900

Fielding flubs continued to stymie the Pirates in the second game as they held Brooklyn only one earned run, but allowed three unearned in the top of the sixth thanks to a series-high six errors in the field. Brooklyn hurler Frank Kitson held Pittsburgh to four hits.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Brooklyn 0 1 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 4 7 0
Pittsburgh 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 2 4 6
W: Frank Kitson (1–0)   L: Sam Leever (0–1)   Att.: 1,800

Game 3

Deacon Phillippe (baseball card)
Deacon Phillippe pitched a six-hit shutout for Pittsburgh in Game 3.

October 17, 1900

Pittsburgh avoided the sweep by battering Harry Howell for 13 hits — all singles — and 10 runs. It was Brooklyn's turn to hurt themselves, as seven of the 10 runs were unearned. Deacon Phillippe threw a six-hit shutout.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Brooklyn 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 3
Pittsburgh 3 1 0 0 2 0 1 3 x 10 13 1
W: Deacon Phillippe (1–0)   L: Harry Howell (0–1)   Att.: 2,500

Game 4

October 18, 1900

Joe McGinnity was shaky in the final game, allowing nine hits, but the Brooklyn defense returned to form (they had the second-fewest errors in the league) as it allowed only one run to score. McGinnity did not allow an earned run in his two complete game wins during the series. Three Brooklyn singles coupled with a fielding error by Pittsburgh hurler Sam Leever in the fourth inning gave the Superbas a comfortable 4–0 cushion which they would not relinquish.

Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R H E
Brooklyn 1 0 0 3 1 1 0 0 0 6 8 0
Pittsburgh 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 9 3
W: Joe McGinnity (2–0)   L: Sam Leever (0–2)   Att.: 2,335

Series stats

Brooklyn Superbas

Batting

Player G AB R H 2B 3B HR TB SH BB HBP SB DP AVG OBP SLG OPS PO A E PB FPCT
Willie Keeler 4 16 0 6 0 0 0 6 1 1 0 0 0 0.375 0.389 0.375 0.764 6 1 0 0 1.000
Duke Farrell 2 8 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 0 0.375 0.375 0.375 0.750 12 0 0 1 1.000
Lave Cross 4 18 2 5 0 1 0 7 0 0 0 1 0 0.278 0.278 0.389 0.667 4 17 1 0 0.952
Deacon McGuire 2 8 1 2 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 0.250 0.250 0.375 0.625 9 2 1 0 0.909
Fielder Jones 4 18 3 5 0 0 0 5 0 1 0 1 1 0.278 0.316 0.278 0.594 7 1 0 0 1.000
Tom Daly 4 13 2 2 1 0 0 3 1 3 0 0 1 0.154 0.294 0.231 0.525 6 7 0 0 1.000
Bill Dahlen 4 17 3 3 0 1 0 5 0 0 0 1 1 0.176 0.176 0.294 0.471 5 12 1 0 0.941
Joe Kelley 4 17 2 3 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 0.176 0.263 0.176 0.440 10 0 0 0 1.000
Hughie Jennings 4 18 1 3 1 0 0 4 0 1 0 0 1 0.167 0.211 0.222 0.433 44 2 0 0 1.000
Joe McGinnity 2 6 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0.167 0.143 0.167 0.310 0 6 0 0 1.000
Frank Kitson 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0.000 0.250 0.000 0.250 2 1 0 0 1.000
Harry Howell 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0 0 1 0 n/a
Totals 4 145 15 33 3 2 0 40 3 9 0 4 5 0.228 0.268 0.276 0.543 105 49 4 1 0.974

Pitching

Player G W L IP H SO BB WP R ER WHIP RA/9 ERA
Joe McGinnity 2 2 0 18 14 5 3 0 3 0 0.94 1.50 0.00
Frank Kitson 1 1 0 9 4 2 1 1 2 0 0.56 2.00 0.00
Harry Howell 1 0 1 8 13 3 2 1 10 3 1.88 11.25 3.38
Totals 4 3 1 35 31 10 6 2 15 3 1.06 3.86 0.77

Pittsburgh Pirates

Batting

Player G AB R H 2B 3B HR TB SH BB HBP SB DP AVG OBP SLG OPS PO A E PB FPCT
Honus Wagner 4 15 2 6 1 0 0 7 0 0 1 2 0 0.400 0.438 0.467 0.904 10 0 0 0 1.000
Claude Ritchey 4 16 3 5 1 0 0 6 0 1 0 0 0 0.313 0.353 0.375 0.728 6 9 0 0 1.000
Bones Ely 4 14 1 4 1 0 0 5 0 1 0 2 0 0.286 0.333 0.357 0.690 9 13 1 0 0.955
Ginger Beaumont 4 15 2 4 0 0 0 4 1 1 0 1 0 0.267 0.294 0.267 0.561 9 0 0 0 1.000
Jack O'Connor 2 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.250 0.250 0.250 0.500 5 0 1 1 0.800
Sam Leever 2 4 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0.250 0.250 0.250 0.500 2 4 2 0 0.667
Jimmy Williams 4 14 0 3 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 0 0.214 0.267 0.214 0.481 4 8 7 0 0.417
Tommy Leach 4 17 4 3 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 0 1 0.176 0.222 0.176 0.399 13 1 0 0 1.000
Rube Waddell 2 5 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0.200 0.200 0.200 0.400 1 1 0 0 1.000
Chief Zimmer 3 9 1 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 0.111 0.273 0.111 0.384 14 3 1 1 0.941
Tom O'Brien 4 16 1 2 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0.125 0.125 0.188 0.313 34 4 2 0 0.947
Deacon Phillippe 1 4 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 1 2 0 0 1.000
Pop Schriver 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0 0 0 0 -.---
Totals 4 134 15 31 4 0 0 35 1 6 2 7 2 0.231 0.273 0.261 0.534 108 45 14 2 0.908

Pitching

Player G W L IP H SO BB WP R ER WHIP RA/9 ERA
Deacon Phillippe 1 1 0 9 6 5 2 0 0 0 0.89 0.00 0.00
Rube Waddell 2 0 1 14 14 7 3 0 7 4 1.21 4.50 2.57
Sam Leever 2 0 2 13 13 4 4 0 8 1 1.31 5.54 0.69
Totals 4 1 3 36 33 16 9 0 15 5 1.17 3.75 1.25

See also

References

  • Ivor-Campbell, Frederick and Pietrusza, David, "Postseason Play" in Total Baseball: The Official Encyclopedia of Major League Baseball, Total Sports Publishing (1989), ISBN 1-930844-01-8
  • 1900 National League, Baseball-Reference.com
  • Joe McGinnity, Society for American Baseball Research Baseball Biography Project

Notes

  1. ^ The name of Pittsburgh at this time was often spelled without the 'h'.
1900 Brooklyn Superbas season

The 1900 Brooklyn Superbas captured their second consecutive National League championship by four and a half games. The Baltimore Orioles, which had been owned by the same group, folded after the 1899 season when such arrangements were outlawed, and a number of the Orioles' players, including star pitcher Joe McGinnity, were reassigned to the Superbas.

1900 Pittsburgh Pirates season

The 1900 Pittsburgh Pirates season was the 19th season of the Pittsburgh Pirates franchise. The Pirates finished second in the National League with a record of 79–60.

Duquesne Dukes women's basketball

The Duquesne Dukes women's basketball team represent Duquesne University, located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in NCAA Division I basketball competition. They play in the Atlantic 10 Conference

List of National League pennant winners

Each season, a National League team wins the league's pennant, signifying that they are its champion and they win the right to play in the World Series against the champion of the American League. In addition to the pennant, the team that wins the National League playoffs receives the Warren C. Giles Trophy, named after Warren Giles, who was the league president from 1951 to 1969. Warren's son Bill Giles, the honorary league president and owner of the Philadelphia Phillies, presents the trophy to the National League champion at the conclusion of each National League Championship Series (NLCS). The current National League pennant winners are the Los Angeles Dodgers, who won their second-consecutive NL pennant in October 2018.For most of the history of the National League (94 years), the pennant was presented to the team with the best win–loss record at the end of the season. The first modern World Series was played in 1903, and after a hiatus in 1904, continued until 1994, when a players' strike forced the cancellation of the postseason, and resumed in 1995. In 1969, the league split into two divisions, and the teams with the best records in each division played one another in the NLCS to determine the pennant winner. The format of the NLCS was changed from a best-of-five to a best-of-seven format for the 1985 postseason. In 1995, an additional playoff series was added when Major League Baseball restructured the two divisions in each league into three. As of 2010, the winners of the Eastern, Central, and Western Divisions, as well as one wild card team, play in the National League Division Series, a best-of-five playoff to determine the opponents who will play for the pennant.By pennants, the Los Angeles Dodgers (formerly the Brooklyn Dodgers; 23 pennants, 31 playoff appearances) and the San Francisco Giants (formerly the New York Giants) (23 pennants, 27 playoff appearances) are tied for the winningest teams in the National League. In third place is the St. Louis Cardinals (19 pennants and 28 playoff appearances), followed by the Atlanta Braves (17 pennants and 23 postseason appearances between their three home cities of Atlanta, Milwaukee, and Boston) and the Chicago Cubs (17 pennants and 20 playoff appearances [as the Cubs and White Stockings]). The Philadelphia Phillies won the league in back-to-back seasons in 2008 and 2009, becoming the first National League team to do so since the Braves in 1995 and 1996. The Los Angeles Dodgers would also win the league in back-to-back seasons in 2017 and 2018. Before 1903 there was no World Series as we know it today because the leagues were only loosely affiliated. As of 2018, the New York/San Francisco Giants and the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers have the most World Series appearances at 20, followed by the St. Louis Cardinals with 19.

The team with the best record to win the National League pennant was the 1906 Cubs, who won 116 of 152 games during that season and finished 20 games ahead of the Giants, playing in New York at the time. The best record by a pennant-winner in the Championship Series era is 108–54, which was achieved by the Cincinnati Reds in 1975 and the New York Mets in 1986; both of these teams went on to win the World Series.National League champions have gone on to win the World Series 48 times, most recently in 2016. Pennant-winners have also won the Temple Cup and the Chronicle-Telegraph Cup, two pre-World Series league championships, although second-place teams won three of the four Temple Cup meetings. The largest margin of victory for a pennant-winner, before the league split into two divisions in 1969, is ​27 1⁄2 games; the Pittsburgh Pirates led the Brooklyn Superbas (now the Dodgers) by that margin on the final day of the 1902 season.The only currently-existing National League team to have never won a pennant is the Washington Nationals (formerly the Montreal Expos). While the Milwaukee Brewers have never won a National League pennant, they did win a pennant during their time in the American League.

List of pre-World Series baseball champions

The modern World Series, the current championship series of Major League Baseball, began in 1903, and was established as an annual event in 1905. Before the formation of the American Association (AA), there were no playoff rounds—all championships went to the team with the best record at the end of the season. In the initial season of the National League (NL) in 1876, there was controversy as to which team was the champion: the Chicago White Stockings, who had the best overall record (52–14), or the St. Louis Brown Stockings (45–19), who were the only team to have a winning record against every other franchise in the league. The teams agreed to play a five-game "Championship of the West" series, won by St. Louis, 4 games to 1. Beginning in 1884, the championship series between the National League and the American Association were promoted and referred to as the "World's Championship Series" (WCS), or "World's Series" for short; however, they are not officially recognized by Major League Baseball as part of World Series history. Though early publications, such as Ernest Lanigan's Baseball Cyclopedia and Turkin and Thompson's Encyclopedia of Baseball, listed the 19th-century games on an equal basis with those of the 20th century, Sporting News publications about the World Series, which began in the 1920s, ignored the 19th-century games, as did most publications about the Series after 1960. Major League Baseball, in general, regards 19th-century events as a prologue to the modern era of baseball, which is defined by the emergence of the two present major leagues.

In the second year of the WCS, a dispute in the 1885 series concerned Game 2, which was forfeited by the St. Louis Browns when they pulled their team off the field protesting an umpiring decision. The managers, Cap Anson and Charles Comiskey, initially agreed to disregard the game. When St. Louis won the final game and an apparent 3–2 series championship, Chicago owner Albert Spalding overruled his manager and declared that he wanted the forfeit counted. The result of a tied WCS was that neither team got the prize money that had been posted by the owners before the series (and was returned to them after they both agreed it was a tie). Following the collapse of the AA in 1891, four of its clubs were admitted to the National League. The league championship was awarded in 1892 by a playoff between half-season champions. This scheme was abandoned after one season. Beginning in 1893—and continuing until divisional play was introduced in 1969—the pennant was awarded to the first-place club in the standings at the end of the season. For four seasons, the league champions played the runners-up in the postseason championship series called the Temple Cup. A second attempt at this format was the Chronicle-Telegraph Cup series in 1900.

Mylan Classic

The Mylan Classic was a golf tournament on the Web.com Tour. It was played for the first time in September 2010 at Southpointe Golf Club in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Pittsburgh. The title sponsor was Mylan, a pharmaceuticals company based in Canonsburg. Beginning in 2013, the tournament will invite top collegiate players to the event as the Nationwide Children's Hospital Invitational had done from 2007 to 2012.The 2013 purse was US$675,000, with $121,500 going to the winner.

Pittsburgh Americans

The Pittsburgh Americans or Pittsburgh Amerks were a professional American football team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania from 1936 until 1937. The team was a member of the major-league American Football League and participated in the league's 1936 and 1937 seasons.

Pittsburgh Beadling

Pittsburgh Beadling is an amateur American soccer team founded in 1898 in the Pittsburgh suburb of Upper St. Clair, Pennsylvania. It won the 1954 National Amateur Cup.

Pittsburgh Bulls

The Pittsburgh Bulls were a member of the Major Indoor Lacrosse League from 1990 to 1993.They were based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The National Lacrosse League would return to Pittsburgh in 2000 with the Pittsburgh CrosseFire, but the team would only stay for one season before moving to become the Washington Power.

Pittsburgh Champions

The Pittsburgh Champions was a men's slow pitch softball team in the North American Softball League (NASL). The league and the team existed for only one season, 1980. The NASL merged with the American Professional Slow Pitch League (APSPL) to form the United Professional Softball League (UPSL). The team ceased to exist after the leagues merged; there already was a professional softball team in Pittsburgh (the Pittsburgh Hardhats of the APSPL) so the Champions were disbanded.

Pittsburgh Cougars

The Pittsburgh Cougars are a currently dormant junior ice hockey team. The Cougars play their home games at the Iceoplex at Southpointe near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania.

Pittsburgh Ironmen

The Pittsburgh Ironmen were a charter member of the Basketball Association of America (a forerunner of the National Basketball Association). The team was based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and played at Duquesne Gardens.

They ended their only season in the BAA in 1946–47 with a record of 15–45, finishing in fifth and last place in the Western Division and worst overall in the league. According to Nate Silver and Reuben Fischer-Baum, applying the Elo rating system, this was, through 2017, the worst season ever by a professional basketball team in a major league.Note: W = Wins, L = Losses, % = Win–Loss %

Pittsburgh Lyceum

The Pittsburgh Lyceum Club, or Pittsburgh Lyceum, were a professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The team was a member of the Western Pennsylvania Hockey League from 1907 to 1908, and played all of their games at the Duquesne Gardens.

Pittsburgh Pirates (NBL)

The Pittsburgh Pirates were an American professional basketball team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The team was one of the thirteen founding members of the National Basketball League (NBL), which formed in 1937.

Pittsburgh Pirates (WPHL)

The Pittsburgh Pirates were an early professional ice hockey club based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and were members of the Western Pennsylvania Hockey League for the 1908 WPHL season. The team, and the league, played all of their games at the Duquesne Gardens. The Pirates are best known for being involved in the first known trade of professional hockey players.

Pittsburgh Victorias

The Pittsburgh Victorias were one of the earliest professional ice hockey teams. The club was based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and were members of the Western Pennsylvania Hockey League, the first league to openly hire hockey players, from 1902–1904. The team folded in 1904, when the WPHL disbanded its teams to form the Pittsburgh Professionals and compete in the International Professional Hockey League.

Pittsburgh Wallabies

The Pittsburgh Wallabies is a former Eastern Australian Football League and United States Australian Football League team. The club was based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States.

The club in the USAFL in 2004 and the EAFL in 2005.

The club also held a tournament, known as the Steel City Boomerang Cup, which was played only once, in 2004.

Steel City Renegades

The Steel City Renegades are a team in the Women's Spring Football League set to begin play for 2010. They are based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They are the sister team to the Pittsburgh Storm of the North American Football League. They play their home games at Highmark Stadium.

Temple Cup

The Temple Cup was a cup awarded to the winner of a best-of-seven, post-season play-offs championship tournament for American professional baseball for the National League of Professional Baseball Clubs (known as the National League - established earlier in 1876) and awarded four times from 1894 to 1897. The 30-inch-high (76.2 centimeters high) silver cup cost $800, ($22.3 thousand in 2018 dollars) and was donated by coal, citrus, and lumber baron William Chase Temple (1862-1917), a part-owner of the Pittsburgh Pirates at the time.Much like the long running Stanley Cup of ice hockey in the National Hockey League and the Temple Cup's predecessor to the professional baseball team champions, the Dauvray Cup (1887-1893), (awarded seven times in the name of the donor, famed stage actress of the day, Helen Dauvray (1859-1923)), there was only one actual Temple Cup passed along to each baseball season's winning team and city.

Since there was only one major league at the time with the folding of the previous American Association 1882-1891, so the series was later played between the first and second-place teams of the surviving NL. The second-place team defeated the first-place team for the Cup in three of the four series that were played. The Temple Cup was also known as the World's Championship Series. If one team won three titles, that team would have permanent possession of the Cup, later given to the city of Baltimore.

Having moved over with several other AA strong franchises to join the senior National League after the 1891 folding of the American Association after ten seasons in the AA since 1882, the frequent champions and powerful scrappy teams of the Baltimore Orioles continued their winning ways from the old AA, capturing three NL pennants in a row (1894-1895-1896), and winning the Temple Cup also. Owner/manager Ned Hanlon (1857-1937), a Baltimorean and one of the most talented baseball men of the sport's early era ran the "Birds" with talented players like "Wee Willie" Keeler (1872-1923), Wilbert Robinson (1863-1934), and John McGraw (1873-1934). McGraw was later player/manager/owner with the early American League charter member team (and third to carry the Orioles name) of the new Baltimore Orioles of 1901-1902, one of the 8 original franchises in the new AL when reorganized in 1901, from the former Western League (on the minor level, 1885-1899) under activist first president Ban Johnson (1864-1931).

After the 1903 "peace pact" between the two major leagues, ending the "war" between them, recognizing each other as equal in stature, accepting a joint policy on player contracts and beginning a "best-of-seven" tournament of champions between them resulting in the modern inter-league World Series for the next century whose championship trophy replaced the old Temple Cup and soon exceeded its esteem. Also each league was allowed a franchise in the nation's largest city, so McGraw was responsible for the new AL Orioles team to move that year of 1903, after only two seasons in Baltimore to New York City to represent the AL, becoming the New York Highlanders, renamed a decade later as the New York Yankees. McGraw went on and later returned to the NL as owner/manager of the famous opposing New York team in the borough of The Bronx with the legendary New York Giants competitive in the early 20th century.

1900s–1910s
1920s–1930s
1940s–1950s
1960s–1970s
1980s–1990s
2000s–2010s
Related
Franchise
Ballparks
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Minors
World Series
Championships (5)
League pennants (9)
Division titles (9)
Wild Card berths (3)
Media
Franchise
Ballparks
Culture
Lore
Rivalries
Hall of Fame
members
Key personnel
World Series
Championships (6)
League pennants
(23)
Division titles (17)
Wild card berths (2)
Minor league affiliates
Baseball
Basketball
Football
Hockey
Soccer
Other
Venues
Historical

Languages

This page is based on a Wikipedia article written by authors (here).
Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 license; additional terms may apply.
Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.