Chris Jacke

Christopher Lee Jacke (born March 12, 1966) is a former professional American football placekicker best known for playing for the Green Bay Packers in the National Football League.

Before his NFL career, Jacke played collegiately at the University of Texas at El Paso. He was drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the sixth round of the 1989 NFL Draft. He went on to play eight seasons with the Packers from 1989 to 1996. In his last year with the Packers, he assisted the Packers to a 13-3 record and a win in Super Bowl XXXI, defeating Drew Bledsoe and the New England Patriots. In 1997, Jacke became a free agent and was signed by the Pittsburgh Steelers. During training camp he was injured and never played a game for them. Later that season he was signed by the Washington Redskins, only playing in one game. He finished his football career with the Arizona Cardinals for the 1998 and 1999 NFL seasons.[1]

Jacke previously held a record for the longest field goal to end overtime (53 yards) and is fourth behind Mason Crosby, Ryan Longwell and Don Hutson all time for the Packers in scoring.[2]

Jacke was a first-team AP All-Pro in 1993 and is a 2013 inductee into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame.[3]

Chris Jacke
No. 13
Position:Placekicker
Personal information
Born:March 12, 1966 (age 53)
Richmond, Virginia
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:207 lb (94 kg)
Career information
High school:J. J. Pearce
(Richardson, Texas)
College:UTEP
NFL Draft:1989 / Round: 6 / Pick: 142
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Field Goals Made:202
Field Goals Attempt:265
Field Goal Percentage:76.2%
Field Goal Long:54
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

References

  1. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20010627212113/http://sports.nfl.com/2000/playerhighlights?id=2670
  2. ^ "http://www.packersnews.com/story/sports/nfl/packers/insidersblog/2015/01/11/crosby-packers-all-time-leading-scorer/21609377/"
  3. ^ http://www.jsonline.com/blogs/sports/187887441.html
1989 Green Bay Packers season

The 1989 Green Bay Packers season was their 71st overall and their 69th in the National Football League. The Packers posted a 10–6 record, their best since 1972, but failed to make the playoffs. The team was often referred to as the "Cardiac Pack" due to several close-game wins. The 1989 Packers hold the NFL record for most one-point victories in a season with four. The team was coached by Lindy Infante and led by quarterback Don Majkowski, who attained his nickname "The Majik Man."

1991 Green Bay Packers season

The 1991 Green Bay Packers season was their 73rd season overall and their 71st in the National Football League. The club posted a 4–12 record under coach Lindy Infante, earning them fourth-place finish in the NFC Central division. 1991 was the last season the Packers played under Lindy Infante.

1993 All-Pro Team

The 1993 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Pro Football Writers Association, and The Sporting News All-Pro Teams in 1993. Both first and second teams are listed for the AP team. These are the three teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. In 1993 the Pro Football Writers Association and Pro Football Weekly combined their All-pro teams, a practice with continues through 2008.

1994 Green Bay Packers season

The 1994 Green Bay Packers season was the team's 76th season overall and their 74th in the National Football League. The Packers posted a 9–7 record for their third straight winning season. 1994 marked the first of 8 seasons in which Packers' quarterback Brett Favre would throw more than 30 touchdown passes. It also marked the second season in which he started all 16 games for the Packers, starting a record-breaking starting streak which would continue throughout his career. This was the final season that the Packers played at Milwaukee County Stadium; they played home games exclusively at Lambeau beginning in 1995. Three Packers had the distinction of being named to the NFL's All-Time 75th Anniversary Team: Reggie White, Don Hutson, and Ray Nitschke. After defeating the Detroit Lions 16–12 in the NFC Wild Card Game, the season ended in a 35–9 loss to the Dallas Cowboys in an NFC Divisional Playoff Game.Despite another stellar season, Brett Favre, for the first time in his career, was not eligible for the Pro Bowl.

1999 Arizona Cardinals season

The 1999 Arizona Cardinals season was the franchise's 101st season, 80th season in the National Football League and the 12th in Arizona.. The team was unable to match their previous output of 9–7, instead winning only six games. The Cardinals will fail to return to the playoffs until the 2008 season.

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Hank Bruder

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Jesse Whittenton

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Johnnie Gray

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Kabeer Gbaja-Biamila

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Mike Douglass (American football)

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Nate Barragar

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Pete Tinsley

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Ryan Longwell

Ryan Walker Longwell (born August 16, 1974), is a retired American football kicker. After playing college football for the California Golden Bears, he started his professional football career with the San Francisco 49ers, but never played a game for the franchise. He then played for the Green Bay Packers from 1997 to 2005. He played for the Minnesota Vikings from 2006 to 2011. He also played briefly for the Seattle Seahawks during the 2012 playoffs.

Whitey Woodin

Howard Lee "Whitey" Woodin (January 29, 1894 – February 7, 1974) was an American football player. He played with the Racine Legion and the Green Bay Packers and was inducted into the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame in 1973. After retiring from football, Woodin remained in Green Bay and worked for many years at Falls Power and Paper Company.

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