Chris Hanburger

Christian G. Hanburger, Jr. (born August 13, 1941) is a former American football linebacker in the National Football League (NFL) who played his entire fourteen-year career with the Washington Redskins from 1965 to 1978. He was elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2011.

Chris Hanburger
refer to caption
Hanburger playing for the Redskins in Super Bowl VII
No. 55
Position:Linebacker
Personal information
Born:August 13, 1941 (age 77)
Fort Bragg, North Carolina
Height:6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Weight:218 lb (99 kg)
Career information
High school:Hampton (Hampton, Virginia)
College:North Carolina
NFL Draft:1965 / Round: 18 / Pick: 245
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:187
Interceptions:19
Touchdowns:5
Player stats at NFL.com

Early life and college career

After being a star end for the "Crabbers" at Hampton High School in Hampton, Virginia, Hanburger joined the United States Army. He later accepted a scholarship from the University of North Carolina, where he played college football. From 1962 until 1964, Chris played for the Tar Heels on offense, at the center position, as well as on defense, as a middle linebacker. During his stay at UNC, Hanburger was named the All-Atlantic Coast Conference center as both a junior and senior. In 1963, he helped lead his team to the Gator Bowl and a shared ACC Championship with NC State.

NFL career

“He was at that time the smartest player in the league. We did everything we could to try to eliminate him from the play. We knew if we didn't neutralize him, then we had less of a chance of winning.”[1]
John Hannah

Hanburger was drafted by the Redskins in the 18th round of the 1965 NFL Draft. As a professional, he was considered as one of the best outside linebackers of his era and was elected to the Pro Bowl nine times during his career, the most in Washington Redskin history. Hanburger earned the nickname "The Hangman" due to his penchant for clotheslining tackles. From 1973 to 1977, he called the Redskins' defensive signals and acted as the defensive quarterback for head coach George Allen.[1] He was a Four-time First-team All-Pro in 1972, 1973, 1975 and 1976 and a Second-team All-Pro in 1969 and 1974. Additionally, he was either a Pro Bowler or an All-Conference selection every year from 1966 though 1976 with the exception of 1971—receiving post-season honors in 10 of 11 seasons in that span. From 1971 to 1973, he and Jack Pardee, outside linebacker on the opposite side, formed a particularly effective tandem. In 1972, he was named the NFC Defensive Player of the Year by the Kansas City Committee of 101. That year, the Redskins won the NFC championship game of the 1972-73 NFL playoffs against the Dallas Cowboys, when they limited them to 3 points, 96 rushing yards, and 73 net passing yards with Roger Staubach at quarterback, Hanburger getting a sack. But, though the defense allowed only 14 points, the Redskins lost Super Bowl VII to the Miami Dolphins.

Beginning with the 1968 NFL season, Hanburger started 135 straight games, a streak that ended in 1977 after he underwent an appendicitis operation. In the Redskins' season finale of that 1977 season, he recorded 3 sacks against the Los Angeles Rams in a 17-14 win. He played in 1978 to finish his 14-year career. In his career, he picked off 19 passes, recovered 17 fumbles, recorded 46 sacks and scored five touchdowns, two on interception returns and three from fumble recoveries.[2]

On August 25, 2010 Hanburger was nominated as a senior candidate for the Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2011 along with former Rams linebacker and kicker Les Richter. On February 5, 2011, Hanburger was officially inducted at the Enshrinement Ceremony where his bust, sculpted by Scott Myers, was unveiled.

References

  1. ^ a b Richman, Michael (2007). The Redskins Encyclopedia. Temple University Press. p. 291. ISBN 978-1-59213-542-4..
  2. ^ Pro Football reference
1963 All-Atlantic Coast Conference football team

The 1963 All-Atlantic Coast Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various selectors for their All-Atlantic Coast Conference ("ACC") teams for the 1963 college football season. Selectors in 1963 included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press International (UPI). Players who were the consensus first-team selections of both the AP and UPI are displayed in bold.

1964 All-Atlantic Coast Conference football team

The 1964 All-Atlantic Coast Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various selectors for their All-Atlantic Coast Conference ("ACC") teams for the 1964 college football season. Selectors in 1964 included the Associated Press (AP) and the United Press International (UPI). Players selected to the first team by both the AP and UPI are displayed below in bold.

1966 Washington Redskins season

The 1966 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 35th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 30th in Washington, D.C..The Washington Redskins attempted to make Vince Lombardi their new head coach, but Lombardi refused their offer and the Redskins had to settle for Otto Graham. They finished with a 7–7 record, fifth place in the eight-team Eastern Conference.

In Week Twelve, the Redskins set an NFL record for most points by one team in a regular season game, scoring 72 points against the Giants. (Incidentally, this was one point less than the all-time record, the 73 scored by Chicago in the 1940 NFL Championship Game, in which the Redskins surrendered 11 touchdowns and were shut out.)

1968 Washington Redskins season

The 1968 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 37th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 32nd in Washington, D.C.. The team finished 5-9, failing to improve on their 5-6-3 record from 1967.

1969 All-Pro Team

This is a list of players named as All-Pros based on their performance in the 1969 AFL and NFL season. These lists provide a perspective into how players were judged against their peers by critics of their time. Players representing both the National Football League (NFL) and American Football League (AFL) are included.

1972 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1972. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1972.

1973 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1973. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1973.

1973 Washington Redskins season

The 1973 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 42nd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 37th in Washington, D.C..The team failed to improve on their 11–3 record from 1972, and finished 10-4

1974 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1974. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1974.

1974 Washington Redskins season

The 1974 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 43rd season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 38th in Washington, D.C.. the team matched on their 10–4 record from 1973. It's also notable for being Deacon Jones' first and only season with the Redskins; as well as being his final year in the NFL.

1975 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1975. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1975.

1975 Washington Redskins season

The 1975 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 44th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 39th in Washington, D.C.. The team failed to improve on their 10–4 record from 1974 and finsished 8-6.

1976 All-Pro Team

The following is a list of players that were named to the Associated Press All-Pro Team, the Newspaper Enterprise Association All-Pro team and the Pro Football Writers Association, and Pro Football Weekly All-Pro teams in 1976. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP, NEA, and PFWA teams. These are the four All-Pro teams that are included in the Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League and compose the Consensus All-pro team for 1976.

1976 Pro Bowl

The 1976 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 26th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1975 season. The game was played on Monday, January 26, 1976, at the Louisiana Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana in front of a crowd of 32,108. The final score was NFC 23, AFC 20. It was also the first Pro Bowl game played indoors.

The game featured the best players in the National Football League as selected by the league's coaches. John Madden of the Oakland Raiders led the AFC team against an NFC team led by Los Angeles Rams head coach Chuck Knox.The AFC's Billy "White Shoes" Johnson was named the game's MVP on the strength of a 90-yard punt return touchdown and a second punt return of 55 yards that set up a field goal. The referee was Fred Silva.Players on the winning NFC team received $2,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $1,500.

1976 Washington Redskins season

The 1976 Washington Redskins season was the franchise’s 45th overall and 40th in Washington, D.C. The season began with the team trying to improve on their 8–6 record from 1975, which they did, finishing 10-4, second in the NFC East behind the Dallas Cowboys. They would be eliminated from the NFL playoffs by the Minnesota Vikings. This was the first season as a Redskin for Hall of Fame running back John Riggins, signed as a free agent after spending the first five seasons of his career with the New York Jets. This was also the last season in which the Redskins would make the playoffs under Hall of Fame head coach George Allen.

1977 Washington Redskins season

The 1977 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 46th season overall, and would be the last under Hall of Fame head coach George Allen. The season began with the team trying to improve on their 10–4 record from 1976, but they would finish 9-5 and fail to qualify for postseason play.

1978 Washington Redskins season

The 1978 Washington Redskins season was the franchise's 47th season in the National Football League (NFL) and their 42nd in Washington, D.C.. The team failed to improve on their 9–5 record from 1977 and finshed 8-8. This was Jack Pardee's first season as Head Coach. Despite winning their first six straight, the Redskins finished by going 2–8 and missing the playoffs. Their fate was sealed with a five-game losing streak to end the season.

For the 1978 season, the NFL expanded from a 14-game season to a 16-game season.

Bill McPeak

William Patrick McPeak (July 24, 1926 – May 7, 1991) was an American football player and National Football League coach.

Scott Myers

Scott Myers (born 1958, USA) is an American painter and sculptor who lives and works in Texas. He graduated Texas A&M University in 1984 with a doctorate in veterinary medicine. He studied sculpture throughout Italy focusing on Florence, Venice and Rome. Sculpting in Tuscany, he cast his work in bronze at the prestigious Fonderia d'Arte Massimo Del Chiaro in Pietrasanta. In 1994, Myers became an elected member of the National Sculpture Society. On February 12, 2011, Myers was featured in the popular television show Texas Country Reporter. Myers was inducted in the inaugural class of the Haltom City High School Hall of Fame on March 10, 2011.Myers is best known for sculpting busts for the Pro Football Hall of Fame, including Chris Doleman, Chris Hanburger, Rickey Jackson, Russ Grimm, Bob Hayes, Randall McDaniel, Fred Dean, Emmitt Thomas, Bruce Matthews, Rayfield Wright, Elvin Bethea, Curley Culp, Claude Humphrey, Charles Haley and Kevin Greene.Myers' paintings focus mostly on ranch life and western landscapes, with horses and cowboys figuring prominently in his subject matter. His paintings combine bold color with a Monet-like layering of color and texture that makes him unique in the western art genre.

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