Chris Burford

Christopher William Burford III (born January 31, 1938) is a former American football wide receiver.

Burford was a football captain at Stanford, leading the NCAA in receptions with 61 in 1959. The following year, he was a first round draft pick of the Dallas Texans. in the American Football League (AFL)[1] He led the Texans/Chiefs in pass receptions in four seasons (1961–1963, 1965). An AFL All-Star in 1961, he followed that performance with a team-record 12 receptions for touchdowns in 1962.[2] By the end of his career, he was the Chiefs all-time reception leader (391) with 5,505 yards and 55 touchdowns.

For most of his AFL career, Burford was in the top ten in receiving catches, yards, and touchdowns. Burford is a 1975 inductee of the Chiefs' Hall of Fame. In 2010, he was inducted into the African-American Ethnic Sports Hall of Fame.[3] Burford, who is white, was nominated by former black teammate Abner Haynes.[4]

Chris Burford
No. 88
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born:January 31, 1938 (age 81)
Oakland, California
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:220 lb (100 kg)
Career information
College:Stanford
NFL Draft:1960 / Round: 9 / Pick: 105
AFL draft:1960 / Round: 1
Career history
  • Dallas Texans/Kansas City Chiefs (1960–1967)
Career highlights and awards
  • 1x Winner of the Pop Warner Trophy in 1959
  • 1x Pro Bowl (1961)
  • 1x All-pro (1962)
  • Led the Dallas Texans in receiving TD's 1x in 1962
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:391
Receiving yards:5505
Touchdowns:55
Player stats at NFL.com

References

  1. ^ Paige Ricks. "The Rookies". Stanford Magazine. Retrieved July 28, 2012.
  2. ^ "Hall of Fame: Chris Burford - 1975". Kansas City Chiefs. Archived from the original on January 7, 2010. Retrieved July 28, 2012.
  3. ^ http://www.budwinter.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/OaklandInductionCeremony_HOFver2.pdf
  4. ^ Paige Ricks. "The Rookies". Stanford Magazine. Retrieved July 28, 2012.
1958 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1958 All-Pacific Coast football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1958 college football season.

1958 College Football All-America Team

The 1958 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1958. The six selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1958 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (4) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (5) the Sporting News, and (6) the United Press International (UPI).

Three players were unanimously chosen as first-team All-Americans by all six official selectors. They were: (1) quarterback Randy Duncan who won the 1958 Walter Camp Player of the Year Award and led the 1958 Iowa Hawkeyes to the 1958 FWAA national championship; (2) halfback Billy Cannon who led the 1958 LSU Tigers to the 1958 AP national championship and won the Heisman Trophy in 1959; and (3) Army halfback Pete Dawkins who won the 1958 Heisman Trophy and later became a Rhodes scholar, a brigadier general, co-chairman of Bain & Company, and CEO of Primerica. All three have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame.

1959 All-Pacific Coast football team

The 1959 All-Pacific Coast football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific Coast teams for the 1959 college football season.

1959 College Football All-America Team

The 1959 College Football All-America team is composed of college football players who were selected as All-Americans by various organizations and writers that chose College Football All-America Teams in 1959. The six selectors recognized by the NCAA as "official" for the 1959 season are (1) the American Football Coaches Association (AFCA), (2) the Associated Press (AP), (3) the Football Writers Association of America (FWAA), (4) the Newspaper Enterprise Association (NEA), (5) The Sporting News (TSN), and (6) the United Press International (UPI).

Billy Cannon of LSU, Charlie Flowers of Ole Miss, Dan Lanphear of Wisconsin, and Roger Davis of Syracuse were the only four players to be unanimously named first-team All-Americans by all six official selectors. Cannon won the 1959 Heisman Trophy.

1959 Stanford Indians football team

The 1959 Stanford Indians football team represented Stanford University in the 1959 NCAA football season. The team was led by Jack Curtice in his second year. The team played their home games at Stanford Stadium in Stanford, California.

1960 Dallas Texans season

The 1960 Dallas Texans season was the inaugural season of Lamar Hunt's American Football League franchise from Dallas, Texas. Head coach Hank Stram led the team to an 8–6 record and second place in the AFL's Western Conference.For the Texans' inaugural season, team owner Lamar Hunt pursued both legendary University of Oklahoma coach Bud Wilkinson and New York Giants defensive assistant Tom Landry to lead his Texans franchise. Wilkinson opted to stay at Oklahoma, while Landry was destined to coach the NFL's expansion franchise in Dallas. Hunt settled on a relatively unknown assistant coach from the University of Miami, Hank Stram. "One of the biggest reasons I hired Hank was that he really wanted the job", Hunt explained. "It turned out to be a very lucky selection on my part."The Texans set up offices in the Mercantile National Bank Building, while Jerry Foss headquartered the AFL offices out of Dallas, as well. Reserved seats were USD $4, general admission USD $2 and high school students paid USD $.90 that initial season. Don Rossi served as the team's General Manager until November when he was succeeded by Jack Steadman.

The Texans conducted their inaugural training camp at the New Mexico Military Institute in Roswell, New Mexico. The club embarked on a whirlwind pre-season barnstorming tour that featured road games in Oakland, Tulsa, Boston, Abilene, and Little Rock. An announced crowd of 51,000 at the Cotton Bowl witnessed a 24–3 victory against Houston on September 2 as the club concluded a perfect 6–0 preseason record.The Texans had a strong home-state identity with quarterback Cotton Davidson from Baylor, linebacker Sherrill Headrick from TCU and running back Abner Haynes from North Texas. Haynes led the league with 875 rushing yards and nine TDs, as well as combined net yards (2,100) and punt return average (15.4).The Texans also had a flashy, high-scoring club which finished the year at 8–6 as three close losses kept the squad from challenging for the division title. The Texans averaged 24,500 for their home games, the highest average in the league.

1960 NFL Draft

The 1960 National Football League Draft in which NFL teams take turns selecting amateur college American football players and other first-time eligible players, was held at the Warwick Hotel in Philadelphia on November 30, 1959. Many players, including half of those drafted in the first round, signed with teams in the newly created American Football League, including the first overall pick and Heisman Trophy winner Billy Cannon. At the time of the draft, the Cardinals were still the Chicago Cardinals; they moved to St. Louis in March 1960. The Dallas Cowboys were enfranchised in January 1960 after the draft.

1961 Dallas Texans season

The 1961 Dallas texans season was the 2nd season for the Dallas Texans as a professional AFL franchise; They finished the season with a 6–8 record and second-place finish in the AFL Western Conference.

The club moved its training camp to Lamar Hunt's alma mater of Southern Methodist University and started the regular season at 3–1 before hitting a six-game losing skid, the longest such streak of head coach Hank Stram's tenure with the franchise. One of those losses was a 28–21 decision in a Friday night contest at Boston (11/3) which featured a bizarre ending as a raincoat-clad fan knocked down a potential game-tying TD from Cotton Davidson to Chris Burford on the game's final play. The team rebounded to claim wins in three of its final four contests to finish 6–8, marking the club's second straight finish behind the Chargers in the AFL West standings.

1962 All-AFL Team

The 1962 American Football League All-League Team was selected after the 1962 American Football League (AFL) season by three separate entities: current AFL players, the Associated Press (AP), and United Press International (UPI), and was published by The Sporting News. The AFL players only selected a first team, while the AP and UPI also selected second teams at some positions.

1966 American Football League Championship Game

The 1966 American Football League Championship Game was the seventh AFL championship game, played at War Memorial Stadium in Buffalo, New York, on January 1, 1967.It matched the Western Division champion Kansas City Chiefs (11–2–1) and the Eastern Division champion Buffalo Bills (9–4–1) to decide the American Football League (AFL) champion for the 1966 season.

The host Bills entered as two-time defending champions, but the visiting Chiefs were three-point favorites, mainly because of their explosive and innovative offense led by head coach Hank Stram. The Bills were a more conventional team with a solid defensive line and a running mindset on offense. The two teams had split their season series, played early in the schedule without weather as a factor, with the road team winning each.

The Chiefs defeated the Bills by a score of 31–7, and advanced to Super Bowl I to play against the National Football League (NFL) champion Green Bay Packers.

1966 Kansas City Chiefs season

The 1966 Kansas City Chiefs season was the team's seventh season and fourth in Kansas City. With an 11–2–1 regular season record, the Chiefs won the Western Division and defeated the Buffalo Bills to win their second AFL Championship, their first in Kansas City.

The American Football League, also in its seventh season, became a nine-team league in 1966 with the addition of the expansion Miami Dolphins. The 14-game AFL schedule had the teams play six opponents twice and the remaining two once, both from the other division. The sole games for the Chiefs in 1966 were against the New York Jets and Houston Oilers, both victories.

In previous years, the AFL title game concluded the season, but not in 1966, following the merger agreement in June. The Chiefs were invited to play in the inaugural AFL-NFL World Championship Game, later known as Super Bowl I, against the NFL's Green Bay Packers. After a competitive first half, the underdog Chiefs lost momentum and the Packers won 35–10.

The franchise's previous AFL title was four years earlier in 1962 as the Dallas Texans.

1966 Miami Dolphins season

The 1966 Miami Dolphins season was the team's inaugural year as an expansion franchise in the American Football League (AFL). The Dolphins were the first of two expansion teams in the AFL, founded by Minneapolis attorney-politician Joe Robbie and actor-comedian Danny Thomas. Future Harlem Globetrotters and Montreal Canadiens owner George N. Gillett, Jr. was a minority partner, and the team was led by head coach George Wilson. The franchise was granted in August 1965 for $7.5 million.

Their regular season debut on September 2 began with Joe Auer returning the opening kickoff 95 yards for a touchdown, but the Dolphins lost to the Oakland Raiders, 23–14. Auer was the leading scorer for the season and was named team MVP. With an odd number of teams, each of the nine AFL teams had two bye weeks and played fourteen games. Miami lost its first five games before upsetting the Denver Broncos in the Orange Bowl. The Dolphins defeated the Houston Oilers the following week, but then lost the next six consecutive games. In Week 16, Miami won against the Oilers again to finish the season with a 3–11 record. Having defeated the Oilers twice, the Dolphins became the first ever expansion team in the Super Bowl era to sweep a division rival, and the last until the Jacksonville Jaguars did it in 1995 against the Cleveland Browns.

List of NCAA major college football yearly receiving leaders

The list of college football yearly receiving leaders identifies the major college receiving leaders for each season from 1937 to the present. It includes yearly leaders in three statistical categories: (1) receptions, (2) receiving yardage; (3) yards per reception; and (4) receiving touchdowns.

Eleven players have led the NCAA in one or more of these categories in multiple seasons. They are: Reid Moseley of Georgia (1944-1945); Hugh Campbell of Washington State (1960-1961); Vern Burke of Oregon State (1962-1963); Howard Twilley of Tulsa (1964-1965); Ron Sellers of Florida State (1967-1968); Jerry Hendren of Idaho (1968-1969); Mike Siani of Villanova (1970-1971); Steve Largent of Tulsa (1974-1975); Jason Phillips of Houston (1987-1988); Alex Van Dyke of Nevada (1994-1995); and Brennan Marion of Tulsa (2007-2008).

Since 1937, the NCAA record for receiving yards in a single season has been set or broken nine times as follows: Jim Benton of Arkansas in 1937 (814 yards); Hank Stanton of Arizona in 1941 (820 yards); Ed Barker of Washington State 1951 (864 yards); Hugh Campbell of Washington State in 1960 (881 yards); Vern Burke of Oregon State in 1962 (1,007 yards); Fred Biletnikoff of Florida State in 1964 (1,179 yards); Howard Twilley of Tulsa in 1965 (1,779 yards); Alex Van Dyke of Nevada in 1995 (1,854 yards); and Trevor Insley of Nevada in 1999 (2,060 yards).

During that same time, the record for receptions in a single season has been set or broken 13 times as follows: Jim Benton of Arkansas in 1937 (48); Hank Stanton of Arizona in 1941 (50); Barney Poole of Ole Miss in 1947 (52); Ed Brown of Fordham in 1952 (57); Dave Hibbert of Arizona in 1958 (61); Hugh Campbell of Washington State in 1962 (69); Larry Elkins of Baylor in 1963 (70); Howard Twilley of Tulsa in 1964 (95) and 1965 (134); Manny Hazard of Houston in 1989 (142); Freddie Barnes of Bowling Green in 2009 (155); and Zay Jones of East Carolina in 2016 (158).

List of NFL on NBC commentator pairings

The first name that's slated is the play-by-play man while the color commentator or commentators are slated second and sideline reporters, if used, are slated last.

Oakland High School (Oakland, California)

Oakland Senior High School (also known as O-High and OHS) is a public high school in California. Established in 1869, it is the oldest high school in Oakland and the sixth oldest high school in the state.

Super Bowl I

The first AFL-NFL World Championship Game in professional American football, known retroactively as Super Bowl I and referred to in some contemporaneous reports, including the game's radio broadcast, as the Super Bowl, was played on January 15, 1967 at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California. The National Football League (NFL) champion Green Bay Packers defeated the American Football League (AFL) champion Kansas City Chiefs by the score of 35–10.

Coming into this game, considerable animosity existed between the AFL and NFL, thus the teams representing the two rival leagues (Kansas City and Green Bay, respectively) felt pressure to win. The Chiefs posted an 11–2–1 record during the 1966 AFL season, and defeated the Buffalo Bills 31–7, in the AFL Championship Game. The Packers finished the 1966 NFL season at 12–2, and defeated the Dallas Cowboys 34–27 in the NFL Championship Game. Still, many sports writers and fans believed any team in the older NFL was vastly superior to any club in the upstart AFL, and so expected Green Bay would blow out Kansas City.The first half of Super Bowl I was competitive, as the Chiefs outgained the Packers in total yards, 181–164, to come within 14–10 at halftime. Early in the 3rd quarter, Green Bay safety Willie Wood intercepted a pass and returned it 50 yards to the 5-yard line. The turnover sparked the Packers to score 21 unanswered points in the second half. Green Bay quarterback Bart Starr, who completed 16 of 23 passes for 250 yards and two touchdowns, with 1 interception, was named MVP.

It remains the only Super Bowl to have been simulcast in the United States by two networks. NBC had the rights to nationally televise AFL games, while CBS held the rights to broadcast NFL games; both networks were allowed to televise the game. The 1st Super Bowl's entertainment consisted of college marching bands from the University of Arizona and Grambling State University, instead of featuring popular singers and musicians as in later Super Bowls.

W. J. Voit Memorial Trophy

The W. J. Voit Memorial Trophy was awarded by the Helms Athletic Foundation from 1951 to 1978 to the outstanding college football player on the Pacific Coast. The recipient was determined based on votes cast by West Coast football writers and later broadcasters as well. Award recipients include College Football Hall of Fame inductees, O.J. Simpson, Mike Garrett, Jim Plunkett, Joe Kapp, Craig Morton, Billy Kilmer, and Anthony Davis.

Wilcox Academy

Wilcox Academy is an independent school in Camden, Alabama. It is accredited by the Alabama Independent School Association and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

Chris Burford—championships, awards, and honors

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