Chocolate truffle

A chocolate truffle is a type of chocolate confectionery, traditionally made with a chocolate ganache centre coated in chocolate, cocoa powder or chopped toasted nuts (typically hazelnuts, almonds, or coconut), usually in a spherical, conical, or curved shape.

Their name derives from their resemblance to truffles, edible fungi of the genus Tuber.

Chocolate truffle
Truffles with nuts and chocolate dusting in detail
TypeConfection
Place of originChambéry, France
Region or stateSavoie
Main ingredientsChocolate ganache, chocolate or cocoa powder

Varieties

Chocolate truffles with peanut butter 002
Chocolate truffles with peanut-butter filling

Major types of chocolate truffle include:

  • The Swiss truffle is made by combining melted chocolate into a boiling mixture of dairy cream and butter, which is poured into molds to set before sprinkling with cocoa powder. Like the French truffles, these have a very short shelf life and must be consumed within a few days of making.[1]
  • The French truffle is made with fresh cream and chocolate, and then rolled in cocoa or nut powder.
  • The European truffle is made with syrup and a base of cocoa powder, milk powder, fats, and other such ingredients to create an oil-in-water type emulsion.
  • The American truffle is a half-egg-shaped, chocolate-coated truffle, a mixture of dark or milk chocolates with butterfat, and in some cases, hardened coconut oil. Joseph Schmidt, a San Francisco chocolatier, and founder of Joseph Schmidt Confections, is credited with its creation in the mid-1980s.[2]

Other styles include:

  • The Belgian truffle or praline is made with dark or milk chocolate filled with ganache, buttercream, or nut pastes.[3]
  • The California truffle is a larger, lumpier version of the French truffle, first made by Alice Medrich in 1973 after she tasted truffles in France. She sold these larger truffles in a charcuterie in the Gourmet Ghetto neighborhood of Berkeley, then in 1977, she began selling them in her own store, Cocolat, which soon expanded into a chain. The American craze for truffles started with Medrich.[4]
  • A pot truffle is any kind of truffle that includes cannabis.
  • Vegan truffles can have any shape or flavor, and are adapted to vegan diets by replacing dairy with nut milks and butters.[5]

References

  1. ^ Chocolate, Cocoa, and Confectionery: Science and Technology by Bernard W. Minifie (1999), page 545.
  2. ^ "Sweet surrender", Los Angeles Times, February 8, 2006
  3. ^ "Pralines VS Truffles | makingchocolates". Makingchocolates.wordpress.com. 2011-04-16. Retrieved 2013-05-27.
  4. ^ Barron, Cheryll Aimee (September 25, 1988). "Madam Cocolat". The New York Times.
  5. ^ "Fine Artisanal Belgian Chocolates". Chocolatsmeurens.com. 2009-03-25. Retrieved 2013-05-27.

External links

Cadbury Roses

Cadbury Roses are a selection of machine wrapped chocolates made by Cadbury. Introduced in 1938, they are named after the English packaging equipment company "Rose Brothers" (later Rose Forgrove), based in Gainsborough, Lincolnshire, that manufactured and supplied the machines that wrapped the chocolates, although in 2016 the US owners of the company made a controversial decision to wrap the chocolates in identical sized "flow wraps".

They are an extremely common gift on Mothering Sunday and sell well throughout the Christmas period. They are available in plastic tubs or boxes and in the United Kingdom, Isle of Man and Ireland currently contain 11 different varieties of chocolate.

Chocoholic

A chocoholic is a person who craves or compulsively consumes chocolate. There is some medical evidence to support the existence of actual addiction to chocolate. However, the term is mostly used loosely or humorously to describe a person who is inordinately fond of chocolate. The word chocoholic was first used in 1968 according to Merriam-Webster. It is a portmanteau of "chocolate" and "alcoholic".Chocoholism is quite common. In studies of food cravings, chocolate and chocolate confectioneries almost always top the list of foods people say they crave.

Chocolate cake

Chocolate cake or chocolate gâteau (from French: gâteau au chocolat) is a cake flavored with melted chocolate, cocoa powder, or both.

Chocolate liqueur

Chocolate liqueur is a liqueur that tastes like chocolate.

Elmer Candy Corporation

Elmer Candy Corporation was founded in 1855 as the Miller Candy Company in New Orleans, Louisiana. The company sells seasonal holiday candies and, in 2014, was the second-largest manufacturer of Valentine boxed chocolate in North America.

Food Paradise (season 18)

Food Paradise is a television series narrated by Jesse Blaze Snider (formerly by Mason Pettit) that features the best places to find various cuisines at food locations across America. Each episode focuses on a certain type of restaurant, such as "Diners", "Bars", "Drive-Thrus" or "Breakfast" places that people go to find a certain food specialty.

Ganache

Ganache (; French: [ganaʃ]) is a glaze, icing, sauce, or filling for pastries made from chocolate and cream.

Gund Snuffles

Gund Snuffles is a plush bear developed and produced by the GUND toy company and was the recipient of 1996 Oppenheim Toy Portfolio Award.

Hershey's Kisses

Hershey's Kisses is a brand of chocolate manufactured by The Hershey Company. The bite-sized pieces of chocolate have a distinctive shape, commonly described as flat-bottomed teardrops. Hershey's Kisses chocolates are wrapped in squares of lightweight aluminum foil with a narrow strip of paper protruding from the top.

Icing (food)

Icing, or frosting, is a sweet, often creamy glaze made of sugar with a liquid, such as water or milk, that is often enriched with ingredients like butter, egg whites, cream cheese, or flavorings. It is used to cover or decorate baked goods, such as cakes or cookies. When it is used between layers of cake, it is called filling.

Icing can be formed into shapes such as flowers and leaves using a pastry bag. Such decorations are commonplace on birthday and wedding cakes. Chef's colour dye (food colouring) is commonly added to icing mixtures to achieve the desired colour. Sprinkles, colouring mist, edible ink designs, or other decorations are often used on top of icing.

The simplest icing is a glacé icing, containing powdered sugar and water. This can be flavoured and coloured as desired, for example, by using lemon juice in place of the water. More complicated icings can be made by beating fat into powdered sugar (as in buttercream), by melting fat and sugar together, by using egg whites (as in royal icing), by whipping butter into meringue (as in Italian or Swiss meringue buttercream), and by adding other ingredients such as glycerin (as in fondant). Some icings can be made from combinations of sugar and cream cheese or sour cream, or by using ground almonds (as in marzipan).

Icing can be applied with a utensil such as a knife or spatula, or it can be applied by drizzling or dipping (see glaze), or by rolling the icing out and draping it over the cake. The method of application largely depends on the type and texture of icing being used. Icing may be used between layers in a cake as a filling, or it may be used to completely or partially cover the outside of a cake or other baked product.

List of candies

Candy, known also as sweets and confectionery, has a long history as a familiar food treat that is available in many varieties. Candy varieties are influenced by the size of the sugar crystals, aeration, sugar concentrations, colour and the types of sugar used.Simple sugar or sucrose is turned into candy by dissolving it in water, concentrating this solution through cooking and allowing the mass either to form a mutable solid or to recrystallize. Maple sugar candy has been made in this way for thousands of years, with concentration taking place from both freezing and heating.Other sugars, sugar substitutes, and corn syrup are also used. Jelly candies, such as gumdrops and gummies, use stabilizers including starch, pectin or gelatin. Another type of candy is cotton candy, which is made from spun sugar.

In their Thanksgiving Address, Native peoples of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy give special thanks to the Sugar Maple tree as the leader of all trees "to recognize its gift of sugar when the People need it most". In traditional times, maple sugar candy reduced from sap was an important food source in the lean times of winter in North America.

Lollipop

A lollipop is a type of sugar candy usually consisting of hard candy mounted on a stick and intended for sucking or licking. Different informal terms are used in different places, including lolly, sucker, sticky-pop, etc. Lollipops are available in many flavors and shapes.

Magnum (ice cream)

Magnum is an ice cream brand owned by the British/Dutch Unilever company and sold as part of the Heartbrand line of products in most countries. In Greece, the Magnum brand name is owned by Nestlé since 2005-2006 following the acquisition of Delta Ice Cream, so the Unilever ice cream uses the name Magic.

Michael Adamthwaite

Michael David Adamthwaite (born September 1, 1981) is a Canadian voice actor, actor, writer and director. He is credited with providing the voice for many characters in various anime series. He is also known for playing the Jaffa Herak in the science fiction TV-series Stargate SG-1. He is also the voice of Jay in the Cartoon Network show Lego Ninjago: Masters of Spinjitzu.

Milk Tray

Milk Tray is a brand of boxed chocolates currently manufactured by Cadbury. Introduced by Cadbury UK in 1915, it is one of the longest running brands in the confectioner's portfolio. Milk Tray is sold in Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, New York City, South Africa and the United Kingdom.

The name 'Tray' derived from the way in which the original assortment was delivered to the shops. Originally Milk Tray was packed in five and a half pound boxes, arranged on trays from which it was sold loose to customers.

In 1916 a half pound deep-lidded box was introduced with a purple background and gold script, which has undergone minor changes in the ninety years since it was introduced. In 1924 a one-pound box was introduced, and by the mid-1930s the Cadbury's Milk Tray assortment was outselling all its competitors.

The pack design has been regularly updated and the assortment itself has changed in line with consumer preferences, and today it is still one of the most popular boxes of chocolates in the UK selling over 8 million boxes per annum.Production of Milk Tray is made under licence from Cadbury UK in Poland.

Neuhaus (chocolatier)

Neuhaus is a notable Belgian chocolatier which manufactures and sells luxury chocolates, chocolate truffles, biscuits and ice cream. The company was founded in 1857 by Jean Neuhaus, a Swiss immigrant, who opened the first store in the Galeries Royales Saint-Hubert in central Brussels. In 1912, his grandson, Jean Neuhaus II, invented the chocolate praline, a decadent chocolate cream ganache center inside a chocolate shell, the original filled chocolate.Today, Neuhaus has over 1,500 selling points in 50 countries. All Neuhaus products are still made in Vlezenbeek, near Brussels, and are exported worldwide. In 2000, the company received the Royal Warrant of Appointment to the Belgian court.

Sufganiyah

Sufganiyah (Hebrew: סופגנייה or סופגניה‎ [ˌsuf.ɡan.iˈah]; plural: sufganiyot, Hebrew: סופגניות [ˌsuf.ɡan.iˈot]; Arabic: سوفغنية‎) is a round jelly doughnut eaten in Israel and around the world on the Jewish festival of Hanukkah. The doughnut is deep-fried, filled with jam or custard, and then topped with powdered sugar.

Swiss roll

A Swiss roll, jelly roll, roll cake, or cream roll is a type of sponge cake roll filled with whipped cream, jam, or icing.

The origins of the term are unclear. In spite of the name "Swiss roll", the cake is believed to have originated elsewhere in Central Europe, likely Austria. It appears to have been invented in the nineteenth century, along with Battenberg, doughnuts, and Victoria sponge.The spiral layered shape of the Swiss roll has inspired usage as a descriptive term in other fields, such as in optics and many forms of the term "jelly roll".

Truffle (disambiguation)

The truffle is the edible body of fungi in the genus Tuber.

Truffle or Truffles may also refer to:

Chocolate truffle, a chocolate confection

Truffles (character), a character on Chowder

Truffles, a minor character in Peanuts

Truffles, a Happy Tree Friends character

"Savoy Truffle", a song by The Beatles

In programming language implementation, the Truffle interpreter implementation framework, used with GraalVM

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