Chip Banks

William "Chip" Banks (born September 18, 1959) is a former All-Pro professional American football linebacker.

Chip Banks
No. 56
Position:Linebacker
Personal information
Born:September 18, 1959 (age 59)
Lawton, Oklahoma
Career information
High school:Augusta (GA) Laney
College:USC
NFL Draft:1982 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Sacks:46
Interceptions:9
Touchdowns:1
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

High school and college career

Banks graduated from Lucy Craft Laney High School in Augusta, Georgia. He played college football at the University of Southern California (USC), from which he graduated in 1981.

Professional career

Banks was drafted by the Cleveland Browns with the #3 Overall Pick in the 1982 NFL Draft. He was awarded the NFL Rookie of the Year Award and was a four-time AFC Pro Bowler (1982, 1983, 1985, 1986) with the Cleveland Browns. Banks was traded to the San Diego Chargers on April 28, 1987 as part of a deal that saw the Browns and Chargers swap first- and second-round selections in the 1987 NFL Draft. Banks also played with the Indianapolis Colts before retiring in 1993.

NFL statistics

Year Team Games Combined Tackles Tackles Assisted Tackles Sacks Forced Fumbles Fumble Recoveries Fumble Return Yards Interceptions Interception Return Yards Yards per Interception Return Longest Interception Return Interceptions Returned for Touchdown Passes Defended
1982 CLE 9 0 0 0 5.5 0 0 0 1 14 14 14 0 0
1983 CLE 16 0 0 0 4.0 0 1 0 3 95 32 65 1 0
1984 CLE 16 0 0 0 2.5 0 3 17 1 8 8 8 0 0
1985 CLE 16 0 0 0 11.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1986 CLE 16 0 0 0 4.5 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1987 SD 12 0 0 0 3.0 0 2 0 1 20 20 20 0 0
1989 IND 10 0 0 0 1.0 0 1 0 2 13 7 11 0 0
1990 IND 16 0 0 0 4.5 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1991 IND 11 0 0 0 1.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1992 IND 16 0 0 0 9.0 0 1 0 1 3 3 3 0 0
Total Total 138 0 0 0 46.0 0 11 17 9 153 17 65 1 0

[1]

References

  1. ^ "Chip Banks Stats". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved February 27, 2014.

External links

1978 USC Trojans football team

The 1978 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California in the 1978 NCAA Division I-A football season. Following the season, the Trojans were crowned national champions according to the Coaches Poll. While Alabama claimed the AP Poll title because it had defeated top-ranked Penn State in the Sugar Bowl, the Trojans felt they deserved the title since they had defeated Alabama and Notre Dame during the regular season, and then Michigan in the Rose Bowl. Both USC and Alabama ended their seasons with a single loss.

1979 USC Trojans football team

The 1979 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1979 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their fourth year under head coach John Robinson, the Trojans compiled an 11–0–1 record (6–0–1 against conference opponents), won the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) championship, and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 389 to 171. The team was ranked #2 in both the final AP Poll and the final UPI Coaches Poll.

Quarterback Paul McDonald led the team in passing, completing 164 of 264 passes for 2,223 yards with 18 touchdowns and six interceptions. Charles White led the team in rushing with 332 carries for 2,050 yards and 19 touchdowns. Dan Garcia led the team in receiving with 29 catches for 492 yards and three touchdowns.The team was named national champion by the College Football Researchers Association, an NCAA-designated major selector.

1980 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1980 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1980 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1981 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team

The 1981 All-Pacific-10 Conference football team consists of American football players chosen by various organizations for All-Pacific-10 Conference teams for the 1981 NCAA Division I-A football season.

1981 USC Trojans football team

The 1981 USC Trojans football team represented the University of Southern California (USC) in the 1981 NCAA Division I-A football season. In their sixth year under head coach John Robinson, the Trojans compiled a 9–3 record (5–2 against conference opponents), finished in a tie for second place in the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10), and outscored their opponents by a combined total of 284 to 170.Quarterback John Mazur led the team in passing, completing 93 of 194 passes for 1,128 yards with seven touchdowns and five interceptions. Marcus Allen led the team in rushing with 433 carries for 2,427 yards and 22 touchdowns. Jeff Simmons led the team in receiving yards with 28 catches for 543 yards and one touchdown. Allen became the first player in NCAA history to rush for over 2,000 yards in one season. He also gained a total of 2,683 offensive yards, led the nation in scoring, and won the Heisman Trophy, the Maxwell Award, and Walter Camp Award and was also the Pac-10 player of the year.

1982 Cleveland Browns season

The 1982 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 33rd season with the National Football League.

The Browns were among 8 teams that qualified for the playoffs during this strike shorted season, and became one of only four teams to ever qualify for the playoffs despite having a losing record. Browns and the Detroit Lions from the same year are the only two teams with a losing record to qualify as wildcards. In 2010, the Seattle Seahawks became the third team with a losing record to qualify for the playoffs and the first team to win a division title with a losing record (however, the Seahawks were the first to accomplish the former in a non-strike shortened season), followed by the Carolina Panthers four years later. In 1982, the Los Angeles Raiders eliminated the Browns from the playoffs for a second consecutive season, 27–10.

The Browns' first round draft pick, rookie sensation linebacker Chip Banks earned 6.5 sacks in just nine games.

1982 Fiesta Bowl

The 1982 Fiesta Bowl was the first Fiesta Bowl played in January, in light of the bowl game's newgained popularity due to the sunny climate with had games with a team ranked in the top 10 appearing in the 8 of the previous 10 bowls. This one was no different, matching the Penn State Nittany Lions and the USC Trojans to end the 1981 NCAA Division I-A football season for both teams.

1982 NFL season

The 1982 NFL season was the 63rd regular season of the National Football League. A 57-day-long players' strike reduced the 1982 season from a 16-game schedule per team to an abbreviated nine game schedule. Because of the shortened season, the NFL adopted a special 16-team playoff tournament; division standings were ignored (although each division sent at least one team to the playoffs and each division except the NFC West sent at least two teams). Eight teams from each conference were seeded 1–8 based on their regular season records. Two teams qualified for the playoffs despite losing records (the Cleveland Browns and the Detroit Lions). The season ended with Super Bowl XVII when the Washington Redskins defeated the Miami Dolphins 27-17 at the Rose Bowl.

Before the season, a verdict was handed down against the league in the trial brought by the Oakland Raiders and the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum back in 1980. The jury ruled that the NFL violated antitrust laws when it declined to approve the proposed move by the team from Oakland to Los Angeles. Thus, the league was forced to let the officially renamed Los Angeles Raiders play in the second largest city in the United States, returning football to the Los Angeles area proper following a two-year absence (the Los Angeles Rams left the Coliseum for Anaheim Stadium in Orange County in 1980).

For the start of the 1982 season, the Minnesota Vikings moved from Metropolitan Stadium to the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome.

1983 All-Pro Team

The 1983 All-Pro Team is composed of the National Football League players that were named to the Associated Press, Newspaper Enterprise Association, Pro Football Writers Association, Pro Football Weekly, and The Sporting News in 1983. Both first- and second- teams are listed for the AP and NEA teams. These are the five teams that are included in Total Football II: The Official Encyclopedia of the National Football League. The NEA chose two inside linebackers for the first time, as a reflection of the 3-4 which was the common alignment for NFL defenses in the mid-1980s.

1983 Cleveland Browns season

The 1983 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 34th season with the National Football League.

1984 Cleveland Browns season

The 1984 Cleveland Browns season was the team's 35th season with the National Football League. At the season's mid-way point, head coach Sam Rutigliano was fired after starting 1–7. He was replaced by defensive coordinator Marty Schottenheimer, who went 4–4 to finish the season. (Schottenheimer would coach the Browns until 1988, guiding the Browns to a .620 winning percentage in his tenure with the team.)

1984 Pro Bowl

The 1984 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 34th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1983 season. The game was played on Sunday, January 29, 1984, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,445. The final score was NFC 45, AFC 3.

Chuck Knox of the Seattle Seahawks led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by San Francisco 49ers head coach Bill Walsh. The referee was Jerry Seeman.Joe Theismann of the Washington Redskins was named the game's Most Valuable Player. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.

1986 Pro Bowl

The 1986 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 36th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1985 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 2, 1986, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,101. The final score was NFC 28, AFC 24.Don Shula of the Miami Dolphins led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Los Angeles Rams head coach John Robinson. The referee was Bob McElwee.Phil Simms of the New York Giants was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning NFC team received $10,000 apiece while the AFC participants each took home $5,000.

1987 Pro Bowl

The 1987 Pro Bowl was the NFL's 37th annual all-star game which featured the outstanding performers from the 1986 season. The game was played on Sunday, February 1, 1987, at Aloha Stadium in Honolulu, Hawaii before a crowd of 50,101. The final score was AFC 10, NFC 6.Marty Schottenheimer of the Cleveland Browns led the AFC team against an NFC team coached by Washington Redskins head coach Joe Gibbs. The referee was Dick Jorgensen.Reggie White of the Philadelphia Eagles was named the game's MVP. Players on the winning AFC team received $10,000 apiece while the NFC participants each took home $5,000.

1987 San Diego Chargers season

The 1987 San Diego Chargers season was the franchise's strike-shortened 18th season in the National Football League (NFL), and the 28th overall. The team improved on their 4–12 record in 1986 to 8-7 but missed the playoffs. The strike of 1987 reduced the regular season schedule from sixteen to fifteen games. Their stadium, Jack Murphy Stadium, hosted Super Bowl XXII at the end of the season.

The Chargers started the season 8–1, with victories over playoff teams Indianapolis and Cleveland, before notoriously losing their final six games of the season, narrowly missing the playoffs. All but one of their final six losses came to teams that made the postseason in 1987.

1987 was the final season for Chargers quarterback Dan Fouts, who had been with the team since 1973, had led the league in passing four times, and who retired only the third quarterback in history to pass for more than 40,000 yards. Also retiring after the season was tight end Kellen Winslow; ending his career after having played since 1979.

1989 Indianapolis Colts season

The 1989 Indianapolis Colts season was the 37th season for the team in the National Football League and sixth in Indianapolis. The Indianapolis Colts finished the National Football League's 1989 season with a record of 8 wins and 8 losses, and finished tied for second in the AFC East division with the Miami Dolphins. However, the Colts finished ahead of Miami based on better conference record (7–5 vs. Dolphins' 6–8).

Black and White (1999 drama film)

Black and White is a 1999 American film directed by James Toback and starring Robert Downey Jr., Gaby Hoffmann, Allan Houston, Jared Leto, Scott Caan, Claudia Schiffer, Brooke Shields, Bijou Phillips and members of the Wu-Tang Clan (Raekwon, Method Man, Ghostface Killah, Oli "Power" Grant, Masta Killa, Bruce Lamar Mayfield "Chip Banks" and Inspectah Deck) and Onyx (Fredro Starr and Sticky Fingaz). The film also features Ben Stiller as a sleazy police detective, as well as Mike Tyson playing himself and Michael B. Jordan in his film debut. It had its first showing at the Telluride Film Festival on September 4, 1999, followed by a second screening at the Toronto International Film Festival on September 15, 1999. It had its theatrical release in the United States on April 5, 2000.

List of Cleveland Browns Pro Bowl selections

This is a list of Cleveland Browns players who were elected to the Pro Bowl.

The year indicates when the game was played, not the season that it followed.

List of Cleveland Browns first-round draft picks

The Cleveland Browns joined the National Football League (NFL) in 1950 with the Baltimore Colts and San Francisco 49ers after having spent four seasons with the All-America Football Conference. The Browns' first selection as an NFL team was Ken Carpenter, a wide receiver from Oregon State. The team's most recent first round selections were Baker Mayfield, quarterback at Oklahoma and Denzel Ward, cornerback at Ohio State.

Every year during April, each NFL franchise seeks to add new players to its roster through a collegiate draft known as "the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting", which is more commonly known as the NFL Draft. Teams are ranked in inverse order based on the previous season's record, with the worst record picking first, and the second worst picking second and so on. The two exceptions to this order are made for teams that appeared in the previous Super Bowl; the Super Bowl champion always picks 32nd, and the Super Bowl loser always picks 31st. Teams have the option of trading away their picks to other teams for different picks, players, cash, or a combination thereof. Thus, it is not uncommon for a team's actual draft pick to differ from their assigned draft pick, or for a team to have extra or no draft picks in any round due to these trades.

The Browns did not have any draft choices from 1996 to 1998, because then-owner Art Modell took all the team's players to Baltimore, Maryland, effectively stopping the franchise. However, the NFL mandated that the Browns' name, colors, and franchise history remain in Cleveland and that the team would reactivate by 1999. In 1999, the Browns selected number one overall, drafting University of Kentucky quarterback Tim Couch.

The Browns have selected number one overall five times: Bobby Garrett (1954), Tim Couch (1999), Courtney Brown (2000), Myles Garrett (2017) and Baker Mayfield (2018). The team has also selected number two overall only once and number three overall five times. The Browns have selected players from the University of Michigan five times, Ohio State University and the University of Southern California four times, and the University of Florida three times. Four eventual Hall of Famers were selected by the Browns: Doug Atkins, Jim Brown, Paul Warfield, and Ozzie Newsome.

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